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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - John 21:7


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    King James Bible - John 21:7

    Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved saith unto Peter, It is the Lord. Now when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he girt his fisher's coat unto him, (for he was naked,) and did cast himself into the sea.

    World English Bible

    That disciple therefore whom Jesus loved said to Peter, "It's the Lord!" So when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he wrapped his
    coat around him (for he was naked), and threw himself into the sea.

    Douay-Rheims - John 21:7

    That disciple therefore whom Jesus loved, said to Peter: It is the Lord. Simon Peter, when he heard that it was the Lord, girt his
    coat about him, (for he was naked,) and cast himself into the sea.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved saith to Peter, It is the Lord. Now when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he girt on his fisher's
    coat, (for he was naked) and cast himself into the sea.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    λεγει
    3004 5719 V-PAI-3S ουν 3767 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM μαθητης 3101 N-NSM εκεινος 1565 D-NSM ον 3739 R-ASM ηγαπα 25 5707 V-IAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM ιησους 2424 N-NSM τω 3588 T-DSM πετρω 4074 N-DSM ο 3588 T-NSM κυριος 2962 N-NSM εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S σιμων 4613 N-NSM ουν 3767 CONJ πετρος 4074 N-NSM ακουσας 191 5660 V-AAP-NSM οτι 3754 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM κυριος 2962 N-NSM εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S τον 3588 T-ASM επενδυτην 1903 N-ASF διεζωσατο 1241 5668 V-AMI-3S ην 2258 5713 V-IXI-3S γαρ 1063 CONJ γυμνος 1131 A-NSM και 2532 CONJ εβαλεν 906 5627 V-2AAI-3S εαυτον 1438 F-3ASM εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF θαλασσαν 2281 N-ASF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (7) -
    :20,24; 13:23; 19:26; 20:2

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 21:7

    Dijo entonces aquel discípulo, al cual amaba Jess, a Pedro: El Seor es. Entonces Simn Pedro, cuando oy que era el Seor, se ci la ropa, porque estaba desnudo, y se ech al mar.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - John 21:7

    Verse 7. His fisher's
    coat] Or, his upper coat. ependuthn, from epi, upon, and enduw, I clothe; something analagous to what we term a great coat or surtout.

    He was naked] He was only in his vest. gumnov, naked, is often used to signify the absence of this upper garment only. In 1 Sam. xix. 24, when Saul had put off his imatia, upper garments, he is said to have been gumnov, naked; and David, when girded only with a linen ephod, is said to have been uncovered, in 2 Sam. vi. 14, 20. To which may be added what we read in the Sept. Job xxii. 6, Thou hast taken away the covering of the naked; amfiasin gumnwn, the plaid or blanket in which they wrapped themselves, and besides which they had none other. In this sense it is that Virgil says, Geor. i. 2xci10: Nudus ara, sere nudus, i.e. strip off your upper garments, and work till you sweat. See more examples in Bp. Pearce.

    Cast himself into the sea.] It is likely that they were in very shallow water; and, as they were only two hundred cubits from the land, (about one hundred and thirty-two English yards,) it is possible that Peter only stepped into the water that he might assist them to draw the boat to land, which was now heavily laden. It is not likely that he went into the water in order to swim ashore; had he intended this, it is not to be supposed that he would have put his great coat on, which must have been an essential hinderance to him in getting to shore.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 7. Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved , etc.] Which was John the Evangelist and Apostle, the writer of this Gospel: saith unto Peter, it is the Lord ; which two disciples were very intimate with each other, and communicated their thoughts freely to one another.

    John knew that it was the Lord, either by some special revelation, or from the multitude of fishes which were taken, and which showed a divine hand and power to be concerned. So faithful ministers of the Gospel know when Christ is with them, by his power attending their ministrations to the conversion of souls. The Cambridge copy of Bezas reads, our Lord; as do the Syriac, Persic, and Ethiopic versions; and it is reasonable to think, John speaking to a fellow disciple, who had equal interest in him with himself, might so say. Now when Simon heard that it was the Lord ; faith came by hearing, he was immediately convinced, and thoroughly satisfied, having received the hint upon a reflection on the surprising capture of the fishes, that it must be the Lord: he girt his fishers coat unto him . The Greek word ependuthv , here used, is manifestly the tdnwpa of the Hebrews; and which, the Jewish writers say f801 , was a strait garment, which a man put on next his flesh to dry up the sweat; and a very proper one for Peter, who had been toiling all night, and very fit for him to swim in; and, by what follows, appears to be put on him next his flesh: for he was naked; for to suppose him entirely naked, whilst fishing, being only in company with men, and those parts of nature having a covering, which always require one, was not at all indecent and unbecoming: and did cast himself into the sea ; the Syriac adds, that he might come to Christ; and the Persic, and he came to Christ; showing his great love and eagerness to be with him; and, as fearless of danger, risks all to be with Christ; his love being such, that many waters could not quench, nor floods drown.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-14 - Christ makes himself known to his people, usually in his ordinances but sometimes by his Spirit he visits them when employed in their business. It is good for the disciples of Christ to be together in common conversation, and common business. The hour for their enterin upon action was not come. They would help to maintain themselves, an not be burdensome to any. Christ's time of making himself known to his people, is when they are most at a loss. He knows the temporal wants of his people, and has promised them not only grace sufficient, but foo convenient. Divine Providence extends itself to things most minute, an those are happy who acknowledge God in all their ways. Those who ar humble, diligent, and patient, though their labours may be crossed shall be crowned; they sometimes live to see their affairs take a happ turn, after many struggles. And there is nothing lost by observin Christ's orders; it is casting the net on the right side of the ship Jesus manifests himself to his people by doing that for them which non else can do, and things which they looked not for. He would take car that those who left all for him, should not want any good thing. An latter favours are to bring to mind former favours, that eaten brea may not be forgotten. He whom Jesus loved was the first that said, It is the Lord. John had cleaved most closely to his Master in his sufferings, and knew him soonest. Peter was the most zealous, an reached Christ the first. How variously God dispenses his gifts, an what difference there may be between some believers and others in the way of their honouring Christ, yet they all may be accepted of him Others continue in the ship, drag the net, and bring the fish to shore and such persons ought not to be blamed as worldly; for they, in their places, are as truly serving Christ as the others. The Lord Jesus ha provision ready for them. We need not be curious in inquiring whenc this came; but we may be comforted at Christ's care for his disciples Although there were so many, and such great fishes, yet they lost none nor damaged their net. The net of the gospel has enclosed multitudes yet it is as strong as ever to bring souls to God.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    λεγει
    3004 5719 V-PAI-3S ουν 3767 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM μαθητης 3101 N-NSM εκεινος 1565 D-NSM ον 3739 R-ASM ηγαπα 25 5707 V-IAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM ιησους 2424 N-NSM τω 3588 T-DSM πετρω 4074 N-DSM ο 3588 T-NSM κυριος 2962 N-NSM εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S σιμων 4613 N-NSM ουν 3767 CONJ πετρος 4074 N-NSM ακουσας 191 5660 V-AAP-NSM οτι 3754 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM κυριος 2962 N-NSM εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S τον 3588 T-ASM επενδυτην 1903 N-ASF διεζωσατο 1241 5668 V-AMI-3S ην 2258 5713 V-IXI-3S γαρ 1063 CONJ γυμνος 1131 A-NSM και 2532 CONJ εβαλεν 906 5627 V-2AAI-3S εαυτον 1438 F-3ASM εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF θαλασσαν 2281 N-ASF

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    7. Fisher's
    coat (ependuthn). An upper garment or blouse. Only here in the New Testament. In the Septuagint, 1 Sam. xviii. 4, the robe which Jonathan gave to David. 2 Sam. xiii. 18, the royal virgin garment of Tamar. The kindred verb, ejpenduomai, occurs twice (2 Cor. v. 2, 4), meaning "to be clothed upon," with the house which is from heaven, i.e., clothed as with an upper garment. See on that passage.

    Naked. Not absolutely, but clothed merely in his undergarment or shirt.



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