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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Isaiah 21:11


    CHAPTERS: Isaiah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB

    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Isaiah 21:11

    το 3588 οραμα 3705 της 3588 ιδουμαιας 2401 προς 4314 εμε 1691 καλει 2564 5719 παρα 3844 του 3588 σηιρ φυλασσετε επαλξεις

    Douay Rheims Bible

    The burden of Duma calleth to me out of Seir: Watchman, what of the eight? watchman, what of the
    night?

    King James Bible - Isaiah 21:11

    The burden of Dumah. He calleth to me out of Seir, Watchman, what of the
    night? Watchman, what of the night?

    World English Bible

    The burden of Dumah. One calls to me out of Seir, "Watchman, what of the
    night? Watchman, what of the night?"

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Isaiah 21:11

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 vi.ii.ix Pg 8
    Isa. i. 2.

    These are in proof.1555

    1555 In proof of the spiritual meaning of circumcision; but Hilgenfeld joins the words to the preceding sentence.

    And again He saith, “Hear the word of the Lord, ye rulers of this people.”1556


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 2.

    And again: “Thus saith the Lord God, who made the heaven, and stretched it out; who established the earth, and the things in it; and who giveth breath to the people upon it, and spirit to them who walk therein.”3811

    3811


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xlii Pg 5
    Isa. i. 2.

    And again, where He says that these children are aliens: “Strange children have lied unto Me.”4439

    4439


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 53.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 15.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 8
    Again an error; for these words precede the others. These are found in Isa. i. 2.

    and again, “And if ye shall have outstretched hands, I will avert my face from you; and if ye shall have multiplied prayers, I will not hear you: for your hands are full of blood;”1168

    1168


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 23
    Comp. Isa. i. 2 as above, and Acts xiii. 17.

    in Egypt, and was transported through the Red Sea, and who in the desert, fed forty years with manna, was wrought to the semblance of eternity, and not contaminated with human passions,1183

    1183 Sæculi.

    or fed on this world’s1184

    1184


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 25
    Isa. i. 2, as before.

    So, too, Egypt is sometimes understood to mean the whole world1271

    1271 Orbis.

    in that prophet, on the count of superstition and malediction.1272

    1272


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiii Pg 31
    Isa. i. 2.

    So likewise by Egypt is sometimes understood, in His sense,3284

    3284 Apud illum, i.e., Creatorem.

    the whole world as being marked out by superstition and a curse.3285

    3285 Maledictionis.

    By a similar usage Babylon also in our (St.) John is a figure of the city of Rome, as being like (Babylon) great and proud in royal power, and warring down the saints of God. Now it was in accordance with this style that He called the magi by the name of Samaritans, because (as we have said) they had practised idolatry as did the Samaritans.  Moreover, by the phrase “before or against the king of Assyria,” understand “against Herod;” against whom the magi then opposed themselves, when they refrained from carrying him back word concerning Christ, whom he was seeking to destroy.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiv Pg 41
    Isa. i. 2.

    Now, for my own part indeed, even though Scripture held out no hand of heavenly hope to me (as, in fact, it so often does), I should still possess a sufficient presumption3474

    3474 Præjudicium.

    of even this promise, in my present enjoyment of the earthly gift; and I should look out for something also of the heavenly, from Him who is the God of heaven as well as of earth. I should thus believe that the Christ who promises the higher blessings is (the Son) of Him who had also promised the lower ones; who had, moreover, afforded proofs of greater gifts by smaller ones; who had reserved for His Christ alone this revelation3475

    3475 Præconium.

    of a (perhaps3476

    3476 Si forte.

    ) unheard of kingdom, so that, while the earthly glory was announced by His servants, the heavenly might have God Himself for its messenger. You, however, argue for another Christ, from the very circumstance that He proclaims a new kingdom. You ought first to bring forward some example of His beneficence,3477

    3477 Indulgentiæ.

    that I may have no good reason for doubting the credibility of the great promise, which you say ought to be hoped for; nay, it is before all things necessary that you should prove that a heaven belongs to Him, whom you declare to be a promiser of heavenly things. As it is, you invite us to dinner, but do not point out your house; you assert a kingdom, but show us no royal state.3478

    3478 Regiam: perhaps “capital” or “palace.”

    Can it be that your Christ promises a kingdom of heaven, without having a heaven; as He displayed Himself man, without having flesh? O what a phantom from first to last!3479

    3479 Omne.

    O hollow pretence of a mighty promise!


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.ix Pg 30
    Isa. i. 2.

    yet He added not “from the womb.” Now, why should He have added so superfluously this phrase “from the womb” (as if there could be any doubt about any one’s having been born from the womb), unless the Holy Ghost had wished the words to be with especial care5609

    5609 Curiosius.

    understood of Christ? “I have begotten Thee from the womb,” that is to say, from a womb only, without a man’s seed, making it a condition of a fleshly body5610

    5610 Deputans carni: a note against Docetism.

    that it should come out of a womb. What is here added (in the Psalm), “Thou art a priest for ever,”5611

    5611


    Anf-03 vi.iv.ii Pg 5
    Isa. i. 2.

    Moreover, in saying “Father,” we also call Him “God.” That appellation is one both of filial duty and of power. Again, in the Father the Son is invoked; “for I,” saith He, “and the Father are One.”8771

    8771


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.vi Pg 14
    Isa. i. 2, 3.

    We indeed, who know for certain that Christ always spoke in the prophets, as the Spirit of the Creator (for so says the prophet: “The person of our Spirit, Christ the Lord,”3169

    3169 This seems to be a translation with a slight alteration of the LXX. version of Lam. iv. 20, πνεῦμα προσώπου ἡμῶν Χριστὸς Κύριος .

    who from the beginning was both heard and seen as the Father’s vicegerent in the name of God), are well aware that His words, when actually upbraiding Israel, were the same as those which it was foretold that He should denounce against him: “Ye have forsaken the Lord, and have provoked the Holy One of Israel to anger.”3170

    3170


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 2
    Deut. xxxii. 1.

    Again, David saying that his help came from the Lord, asserts: “My help is from the Lord, who made heaven and earth.”3809

    3809


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 2
    Deut. xxxii. 1.

    Again, David saying that his help came from the Lord, asserts: “My help is from the Lord, who made heaven and earth.”3809

    3809


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-01 vi.ii.ix Pg 8
    Isa. i. 2.

    These are in proof.1555

    1555 In proof of the spiritual meaning of circumcision; but Hilgenfeld joins the words to the preceding sentence.

    And again He saith, “Hear the word of the Lord, ye rulers of this people.”1556


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 2.

    And again: “Thus saith the Lord God, who made the heaven, and stretched it out; who established the earth, and the things in it; and who giveth breath to the people upon it, and spirit to them who walk therein.”3811

    3811


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xlii Pg 5
    Isa. i. 2.

    And again, where He says that these children are aliens: “Strange children have lied unto Me.”4439

    4439


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 53.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 15.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 8
    Again an error; for these words precede the others. These are found in Isa. i. 2.

    and again, “And if ye shall have outstretched hands, I will avert my face from you; and if ye shall have multiplied prayers, I will not hear you: for your hands are full of blood;”1168

    1168


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 23
    Comp. Isa. i. 2 as above, and Acts xiii. 17.

    in Egypt, and was transported through the Red Sea, and who in the desert, fed forty years with manna, was wrought to the semblance of eternity, and not contaminated with human passions,1183

    1183 Sæculi.

    or fed on this world’s1184

    1184


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 25
    Isa. i. 2, as before.

    So, too, Egypt is sometimes understood to mean the whole world1271

    1271 Orbis.

    in that prophet, on the count of superstition and malediction.1272

    1272


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiii Pg 31
    Isa. i. 2.

    So likewise by Egypt is sometimes understood, in His sense,3284

    3284 Apud illum, i.e., Creatorem.

    the whole world as being marked out by superstition and a curse.3285

    3285 Maledictionis.

    By a similar usage Babylon also in our (St.) John is a figure of the city of Rome, as being like (Babylon) great and proud in royal power, and warring down the saints of God. Now it was in accordance with this style that He called the magi by the name of Samaritans, because (as we have said) they had practised idolatry as did the Samaritans.  Moreover, by the phrase “before or against the king of Assyria,” understand “against Herod;” against whom the magi then opposed themselves, when they refrained from carrying him back word concerning Christ, whom he was seeking to destroy.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiv Pg 41
    Isa. i. 2.

    Now, for my own part indeed, even though Scripture held out no hand of heavenly hope to me (as, in fact, it so often does), I should still possess a sufficient presumption3474

    3474 Præjudicium.

    of even this promise, in my present enjoyment of the earthly gift; and I should look out for something also of the heavenly, from Him who is the God of heaven as well as of earth. I should thus believe that the Christ who promises the higher blessings is (the Son) of Him who had also promised the lower ones; who had, moreover, afforded proofs of greater gifts by smaller ones; who had reserved for His Christ alone this revelation3475

    3475 Præconium.

    of a (perhaps3476

    3476 Si forte.

    ) unheard of kingdom, so that, while the earthly glory was announced by His servants, the heavenly might have God Himself for its messenger. You, however, argue for another Christ, from the very circumstance that He proclaims a new kingdom. You ought first to bring forward some example of His beneficence,3477

    3477 Indulgentiæ.

    that I may have no good reason for doubting the credibility of the great promise, which you say ought to be hoped for; nay, it is before all things necessary that you should prove that a heaven belongs to Him, whom you declare to be a promiser of heavenly things. As it is, you invite us to dinner, but do not point out your house; you assert a kingdom, but show us no royal state.3478

    3478 Regiam: perhaps “capital” or “palace.”

    Can it be that your Christ promises a kingdom of heaven, without having a heaven; as He displayed Himself man, without having flesh? O what a phantom from first to last!3479

    3479 Omne.

    O hollow pretence of a mighty promise!


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.ix Pg 30
    Isa. i. 2.

    yet He added not “from the womb.” Now, why should He have added so superfluously this phrase “from the womb” (as if there could be any doubt about any one’s having been born from the womb), unless the Holy Ghost had wished the words to be with especial care5609

    5609 Curiosius.

    understood of Christ? “I have begotten Thee from the womb,” that is to say, from a womb only, without a man’s seed, making it a condition of a fleshly body5610

    5610 Deputans carni: a note against Docetism.

    that it should come out of a womb. What is here added (in the Psalm), “Thou art a priest for ever,”5611

    5611


    Anf-03 vi.iv.ii Pg 5
    Isa. i. 2.

    Moreover, in saying “Father,” we also call Him “God.” That appellation is one both of filial duty and of power. Again, in the Father the Son is invoked; “for I,” saith He, “and the Father are One.”8771

    8771


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.vi Pg 14
    Isa. i. 2, 3.

    We indeed, who know for certain that Christ always spoke in the prophets, as the Spirit of the Creator (for so says the prophet: “The person of our Spirit, Christ the Lord,”3169

    3169 This seems to be a translation with a slight alteration of the LXX. version of Lam. iv. 20, πνεῦμα προσώπου ἡμῶν Χριστὸς Κύριος .

    who from the beginning was both heard and seen as the Father’s vicegerent in the name of God), are well aware that His words, when actually upbraiding Israel, were the same as those which it was foretold that He should denounce against him: “Ye have forsaken the Lord, and have provoked the Holy One of Israel to anger.”3170

    3170


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 54.1


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxv Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxv Pg 2
    Ps. xxiv. 7.

    as if it referred likewise to Hezekiah, and others of you [expound it] of Solomon; but neither to the latter nor to the former, nor, in short, to any of your kings, can it be proved to have reference, but to this our Christ alone, who appeared without comeliness, and inglorious, as Isaiah and David and all the Scriptures said; who is the Lord of hosts, by the will of the Father who conferred on Him [the dignity]; who also rose from the dead, and ascended to heaven, as the Psalm and the other Scriptures manifested when they announced Him to be Lord of hosts; and of this you may, if you will, easily be persuaded by the occurrences which take place before your eyes. For every demon, when exorcised in the name of this very Son of God —who is the First-born of every creature, who became man by the Virgin, who suffered, and was crucified under Pontius Pilate by your nation, who died, who rose from the dead, and ascended into heaven —is overcome and subdued. But though you exorcise any demon in the name of any of those who were amongst you—either kings, or righteous men, or prophets, or patriarchs—it will not be subject to you. But if any of you exorcise it in [the name of] the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, it will perhaps be subject to you. Now assuredly your exorcists, I have said,2281

    2281 Chap. lxxvi.

    make use of craft when they exorcise, even as the Gentiles do, and employ fumigations and incantations.2282

    2282 κατάδεσμοι, by some thought to be verses by which evil spirits, once expelled, were kept from returning. Plato (Rep.) speaks of incantations by which demons were summoned to the help of those who practised such rites; but Justin refers to them only as being expelled. Others regard them as drugs.

    But that they are angels and powers whom the word of prophecy by David [commands] to lift up the gates, that He who rose from the dead, Jesus Christ, the Lord of hosts, according to the will of the Father, might enter, the word of David has likewise showed; which I shall again recall to your attention for the sake of those who were not with us yesterday, for whose benefit, moreover, I sum up many things I said yesterday. And now, if I say this to you, although I have repeated it many times, I know that it is not absurd so to do. For it is a ridiculous thing to see the sun, and the moon, and the other stars, continually keeping the same course, and bringing round the different seasons; and to see the computer who may be asked how many are twice two, because he has frequently said that they are four, not ceasing to say again that they are four; and equally so other things, which are confidently admitted, to be continually mentioned and admitted in like manner; yet that he who founds his discourse on the prophetic Scriptures should leave them and abstain from constantly referring to the same Scriptures, because it is thought he can bring forth something better than Scripture. The passage, then, by which I proved that God reveals that there are both angels and hosts in heaven is this: ‘Praise the Lord from the heavens: praise Him in the highest. Praise Him, all His angels: praise Him, all His hosts.’ ”2283

    2283


    Anf-01 viii.ii.li Pg 3
    Ps. xxiv. 7.

    And how also He should come again out of heaven with glory, hear what was spoken in reference to this by the prophet Jeremiah.1874

    1874


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxvii Pg 8
    Ps. xxiv. 7.

    and again, when He says: ‘The Lord says to my Lord, Sit at My right hand, till I make Thine enemies Thy footstool.’2455

    2455


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 89
    Ps. xxiv. 7.

    proclaimed beforehand His resurrection from the dead through the Father’s power, and His reception into heaven. And when they expressed themselves thus, “His going forth is from the height of heaven, and His returning even to the highest heaven; and there is no one who can hide himself from His heat,”4328

    4328


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxvi Pg 4
    Ps. xxiv.

    Accordingly, it is shown that Solomon is not the Lord of hosts; but when our Christ rose from the dead and ascended to heaven, the rulers in heaven, under appointment of God, are commanded to open the gates of heaven, that He who is King of glory may enter in, and having ascended, may sit on the right hand of the Father until He make the enemies His footstool, as has been made manifest by another Psalm. For when the rulers of heaven saw Him of uncomely and dishonoured appearance, and inglorious, not recognising Him, they inquired, ‘Who is this King of glory?’ And the Holy Spirit, either from the person of His Father, or from His own person, answers them, ‘The Lord of hosts, He is this King of glory.’ For every one will confess that not one of those who presided over the gates of the temple at Jerusalem would venture to say concerning Solomon, though he was so glorious a king, or concerning the ark of testimony, ‘Who is this King of glory?’


    Anf-03 v.x.x Pg 9
    Ps. xxiv. 7.

    if you have also heard from Amos, “Who buildeth up to the heavens his way of ascent, and is such as to pour forth his abundance (of waters) over the earth;”8281

    8281 Amos ix. 6.

    know that both that way of ascent was thereafter levelled with the ground, by the footsteps of the Lord, and an entrance thereafter opened up by the might of Christ, and that no delay or inquest will meet Christians on the threshold, since they have there to be not discriminated from one another, but owned, and not put to the question, but received in.  For though you think heaven still shut, remember that the Lord left here to Peter and through him to the Church, the keys of it, which every one who has been here put to the question, and also made confession, will carry with him. But the devil stoutly affirms that we must confess there, to persuade us that we must deny here. I shall send before me fine documents, to be sure,8282

    8282 In support of my cause.

    I shall carry with me excellent keys, the fear of them who kill the body only, but do nought against the soul: I shall be graced by the neglect of this command:  I shall stand with credit in heavenly places, who could not stand in earthly: I shall hold out against the greater powers, who yielded to the lesser:  I shall deserve to be at length let in, though now shut out. It readily occurs to one to remark further, “If it is in heaven that men must confess, it is here too that they must deny.” For where the one is, there both are. For contraries always go together. There will need to be carried on in heaven persecution even, which is the occasion of confession or denial. Why, then, do you refrain, O most presumptuous heretic, from transporting to the world above the whole series of means proper to the intimidation of Christians, and especially to put there the very hatred for the name, where Christ rules at the right hand of the Father? Will you plant there both synagogues of the Jewsfountains of persecution—before which the apostles endured the scourge, and heathen assemblages with their own circus, forsooth, where they readily join in the cry, Death to the third race?8283

    8283 More literally, “How long shall we suffer the third race!”  The Christians are meant; the first race being the heathen, and the second the Jews.—Tr.

    But ye are bound to produce in the same place both our brothers, fathers, children, mothers-in-law, daughters-in-law and those of our household, through whose agency the betrayal has been appointed; likewise kings, governors, and armed authorities, before whom the matter at issue must be contested. Assuredly there will be in heaven a prison also, destitute of the sun’s rays or full of light unthankfully, and fetters of the zones perhaps, and, for a rack-horse, the axis itself which whirls the heavens round. Then, if a Christian is to be stoned, hail-storms will be near; if burned, thunderbolts are at hand; if butchered, the armed Orion will exercise his function; if put an end to by beasts, the north will send forth the bears, the Zodiac the bulls and the lions. He who will endure these assaults to the end, the same shall be saved. Will there be then, in heaven, both an end, and suffering, a killing, and the first confession? And where will be the flesh requisite for all this? Where the body which alone has to be killed by men?  Unerring reason has commanded us to set forth these things in even a playful manner; nor will any one thrust out the bar consisting in this objection (we have offered), so as not to be compelled to transfer the whole array of means proper to persecution, all the powerful instrumentality which has been provided for dealing with this matter, to the place where he has put the court before which confession should be made. Since confession is elicited by persecution, and persecution ended in confession, there cannot but be at the same time, in attendance upon these, the instrumentality which determines both the entrance and the exit, that is, the beginning and the end.  But both hatred for the name will be here, persecution breaks out here, betrayal brings men forth here, examination uses force here, torture rages here, and confession or denial completes this whole course of procedure on the earth. Therefore, if the other things are here, confession also is not elsewhere; if confession is elsewhere, the other things also are not here.  Certainly the other things are not elsewhere; therefore neither is confession in heaven. Or, if they will have it that the manner in which the heavenly examination and confession take place is different, it will certainly be also incumbent on them to devise a mode of procedure of their own of a very different kind, and opposed to that method which is indicated in the Scriptures.  And we may be able to say, Let them consider (whether what they imagine to exist does so), if so be that this course of procedure, proper to examination and confession on earth—a course which has persecution as the source in which it originates, and which pleads dissension in the state—is preserved to its own faith, if so be that we must believe just as is also written, and understand just as is spoken.  Here I endure the entire course (in question), the Lord Himself not appointing a different quarter of the world for my doing so. For what does He add after finishing with confession and denial?  “Think not that I am come to send peace on earth, but a sword,”—undoubtedly on the earth. “For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the mother-in-law against her daughter-in-law. And a man’s foes shall be they of his own household.”8284

    8284


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxv Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxvi Pg 4
    Ps. xxiv.

    Accordingly, it is shown that Solomon is not the Lord of hosts; but when our Christ rose from the dead and ascended to heaven, the rulers in heaven, under appointment of God, are commanded to open the gates of heaven, that He who is King of glory may enter in, and having ascended, may sit on the right hand of the Father until He make the enemies His footstool, as has been made manifest by another Psalm. For when the rulers of heaven saw Him of uncomely and dishonoured appearance, and inglorious, not recognising Him, they inquired, ‘Who is this King of glory?’ And the Holy Spirit, either from the person of His Father, or from His own person, answers them, ‘The Lord of hosts, He is this King of glory.’ For every one will confess that not one of those who presided over the gates of the temple at Jerusalem would venture to say concerning Solomon, though he was so glorious a king, or concerning the ark of testimony, ‘Who is this King of glory?’


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xvii Pg 14
    Ps. xxiv. 10.

    From Him also is besought “the spirit of wisdom,”5960

    5960


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 39
    This passage it is not easy to identify. [See Is. lxiii. 3.] The books point to Isa. lxv. 5, but there is there no trace of it.

    Therefore He reckoned them “as the drop of a bucket,”4502

    4502


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 40
    Isa. xl. 15. [Compare Is. lxiii. 3. Sept.]

    while “Sion He left as a look-out4503

    4503 Speculam.

    in a vineyard.”4504

    4504


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlvi Pg 4
    Easy enough, by the LXX. See Isaiah lxiii. 3. καὶ τῶν εθνῶν οὐκ ἔστιν ἀνὴρ μετ᾽ εμοῦ. The first verse, referring to Edom, leads our author to accentuate this point of Gentile ignorance.


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 139


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxvi Pg 4
    Isa. lxii. 10 to end, Isa. lxiii. 1–6.



    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.i Pg 20.1


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxv Pg 14
    Ex. xxv. 17.

    also does in like manner not at all harmonize with their expositions. Moreover, the table of shew-bread3162

    3162


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxxvii Pg 2
    Zech. ii. 8.

    to God, is as one that touches the apple of God’s eye, how much more so is he that touches His beloved! And that this is He, has been sufficiently demonstrated.”


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxv Pg 4
    Zech. ii. 8.

    Such identity of care proceeds from one and the same Being. A trespassing brother He will have rebuked.4862

    4862


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 27
    Isa. v. 26.

    swiftly, because hastening towards the fulness of the times; with speed, because unclogged by the weights of the ancient law. They shall neither hunger nor thirst. Therefore they shall be filled,—a promise which is made to none but those who hunger and thirst. And again He says: “Behold, my servants shall be filled, but ye shall be hungry; behold, my servants shall drink, but ye shall be thirsty.”3959

    3959


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 42
    Vel: or, “if you please;” indicating some uncertainty in the quotation. The passage is more like Jer. xv. 14 than anything in Isaiah (see, however, Isa. xxx. 27; 30).

    by Isaiah, “A fire has been kindled in mine anger.” He cannot lie. If it is not He who uttered His voice out of even the burning bush, it can be of no importance4691

    4691 Viderit.

    what fire you insist upon being understood.  Even if it be but figurative fire, yet, from the very fact that he takes from my element illustrations for His own sense, He is mine, because He uses what is mine. The similitude of fire must belong to Him who owns the reality thereof. But He will Himself best explain the quality of that fire which He mentioned, when He goes on to say, “Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division.”4692

    4692


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxvi Pg 4
    Isa. lxii. 10 to end, Isa. lxiii. 1–6.



    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-01 ii.ii.iv Pg 3
    Gen. xxvii. 41, etc.

    Envy made Joseph be persecuted unto death, and to come into bondage.20

    20


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cvi Pg 2
    Num. xxiv. 17.

    and another Scripture says, ‘Behold a man; the East is His name.’2358

    2358


    Anf-01 ix.iv.x Pg 12
    Num. xxiv. 17.

    But Matthew says that the Magi, coming from the east, exclaimed “For we have seen His star in the east, and are come to worship Him;”3383

    3383


    Npnf-201 iii.ix.vi Pg 5


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 30.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 49
    Dan. vii. 4.

    John also, the Lord’s disciple, when beholding the sacerdotal and glorious advent of His kingdom, says in the Apocalypse: “I turned to see the voice that spake with me. And, being turned, I saw seven golden candlesticks; and in the midst of the candlesticks One like unto the Son of man, clothed with a garment reaching to the feet, and girt about the paps with a golden girdle; and His head and His hairs were white, as white as wool, and as snow; and His eyes were as a flame of fire; and His feet like unto fine brass, as if He burned in a furnace. And His voice [was] as the voice of waters; and He had in His right hand seven stars; and out of His mouth went a sharp two-edged sword; and His countenance was as the sun shining in his strength.”4101

    4101


    Edersheim Bible History

    Lifetimes ix.xviii Pg 65.5, Sketches ix Pg 9.3, Sketches xx Pg 16.3


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 21

    VERSE 	(11) - 

    Isa 34:1-17; 63:1-6 Nu 24:18 De 2:5 Ps 137:7 Jer 49:7-22


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET