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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Deuteronomy 32:1


    CHAPTERS: Deuteronomy 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB

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    King James Bible - Deuteronomy 32:1

    Give ear, O ye heavens, and I will speak; and hear, O earth, the words of my mouth.

    World English Bible

    Give
    ear, you heavens, and I will speak. Let the earth hear the words of my mouth.

    Douay-Rheims - Deuteronomy 32:1

    Hear, O ye heavens, the things I speak, let the earth give
    ear to the words of my mouth.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Give
    ear, O ye heavens, and I will speak; and hear, O earth, the words of my mouth.

    Original Hebrew

    האזינו
    238 השׁמים 8064 ואדברה 1696 ותשׁמע 8085 הארץ 776 אמרי 561 פי׃ 6310

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 32:1

    ¶ Escuchad, cielos, y hablaré; y oiga la tierra los dichos de mi boca.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Deuteronomy 32:1

    Verse 1. On the inimitable excellence of this ode much has been written by commentators, critics, and
    poets; and it is allowed by the best judges to contain a specimen of almost every species of excellence in composition. It is so thoroughly poetic that even the dull Jews themselves found they could not write it in the prose form; and hence it is distinguished as poetry in every Hebrew Bible by being written in its own hemistichs or short half lines, which is the general form of the Hebrew poetry; and were it translated in the same way it would be more easily understood. The song itself has suffered both by transcribers and translators, the former having mistaken some letters in different places, and made wrong combinations of them in others. As to the translators, most of them have followed their own fancy, from good Mr. Ainsworth, who ruined it by the most inanimate rhyming version, to certain latter poets, who have cast it unhallowedly into a European mould. See the observations at the end of the chapter.

    Give ear, O ye heavens] Let angels and men hear, and let this testimony of God be registered both in heaven and earth. Heaven and earth are appealed to as permanent witnesses.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. Give ear, O ye heavens, and I will speak; and hear, O earth , the words of my mouth .] This song is prefaced and introduced in a very grand and pompous manner, calling on the heavens and earth to give attention; by which they themselves may be meant, by a “prosopopaeia”, a figure frequently used in Scripture, when things of great moment and importance are spoken of; and these are called upon to hearken, either to rebuke the stupidity and inattention of men, or to show that these would shed or withhold their influences, their good things, according to the obedience or disobedience of Israel; or because these are durable and lasting, and so would ever be witnesses for God and against his people: Gaon, as Aben Ezra observes, by the heavens understands the angels, and by the earth the men of the earth, the inhabitants of both worlds, which is not amiss: and by these words of Moses are meant the words of the song, referred to in ( Deuteronomy 31:29); here called his words, not because they were of him, but because they were put into his mouth, and about to be expressed by him, not in his own name, but in the name of the Lord; and not as the words of the law, which came by him, but as the words and doctrines of the Gospel concerning Christ, of whom Moses here writes; whose character he gives, and whose person and office he vindicates against the Jews, whom he accuses and brings a charge of ingratitude against for rejecting him, to which our Lord seems to refer, ( John 5:45,46); the prophecies of their rejection, the calling of the Gentiles, the destruction of the Jews by the Romans, and the miseries they should undergo, and yet should not be wholly extirpated out of the world, but continue a people, who in the latter days would be converted, return to their own land, and their enemies be destroyed; which are some of the principal things in this song, and which make it worthy of attention and observation.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1, 2 -
    Moses begins with a solemn appeal to heaven and earth, concerning the truth and importance of what he was about to say. His doctrine is the gospel, the speech of God, the doctrine of Christ; the doctrine of grace and mercy through him, and of life and salvation by him.


    Original Hebrew

    האזינו 238 השׁמים 8064 ואדברה 1696 ותשׁמע 8085 הארץ 776 אמרי 561 פי׃ 6310


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52

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