King James Bible Adam Clarke Bible Commentary Martin Luther's Writings Wesley's Sermons and Commentary Neurosemantics Audio / Video Bible Evolution Cruncher Creation Science Vincent New Testament Word Studies KJV Audio Bible Family videogames Christian author Godrules.NET Main Page Add to Favorites Godrules.NET Main Page




Bad Advertisement?

News & Reviews:
  • World News
  • Movie Reviews
  • Book Search

    Are you a Christian?

    Online Store:
  • Your Own eBook/eBay Business
  • Visit Our eBay Store

    Automated eBook Business



  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Deuteronomy 1:1


    CHAPTERS: Deuteronomy 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - РУССКАЯ БИБЛИЯ - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    King James Bible - Deuteronomy 1:1

    These be the words which Moses spake unto all Israel on this side Jordan in the wilderness, in the plain over against the Red sea, between Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Dizahab.

    World English Bible

    These are the
    words which Moses spoke to all Israel beyond the Jordan in the wilderness, in the Arabah over against Suph, between Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Dizahab.

    Douay-Rheims - Deuteronomy 1:1

    These are the
    words, which Moses spoke to all Israel beyond the Jordan, in the plain wilderness, over against the Red Sea, between Pharan and Thophel and Laban and Haseroth, where there is very much gold:

    Webster's Bible Translation

    These are the
    words which Moses spoke to all Israel on the east side of Jordan in the wilderness, in the plain over against Suf, between Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Dizahab.

    Original Hebrew

    אלה
    428 הדברים 1697 אשׁר 834 דבר 1696 משׁה 4872 אל 413 כל 3605 ישׂראל 3478 בעבר 5676 הירדן 3383 במדבר 4057 בערבה 6160 מול 4136 סוף 5489 בין 996 פארן 6290 ובין 996 תפל 8603 ולבן 3837 וחצרת 2698 ודי  זהב׃ 1774  

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    Nu 32:5,19,32; 34:15; 35:14 Jos 9:1,10; 22:4,7

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:1

    ¶ Estas son las palabras que habló Moisés a todo Israel a este lado del Jordán en el desierto, en el llano delante del mar Bermejo, entre Parán, y Tofel, y Labán, y Hazerot, y Dizahab.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Deuteronomy 1:1

    Verse 1. These be the
    words which Moses spake] The five first verses of this chapter contain the introduction to the rest of the book: they do not appear to be the work of Moses, but were added probably either by Joshua or Ezra.

    On this side Jordan] rb[b beeber, at the passage of Jordan, i. e., near or opposite to the place where the Israelites passed over after the death of Moses. Though rb[ eber is used to signify both on this side and on the other side, and the connection in which it stands can only determine the meaning; yet here it signifies neither, but simply the place or ford where the Israelites passed over Jordan.

    In the plain] That is, of Moab; over against the Red Sea-not the Red Sea, for they were now farther from it than they had been: the word sea is not in the text, and the word Pws suph, which we render red, does not signify the Red Sea, unless joined with µy yam, sea; here it must necessarily signify a place in or adjoining to the plains of Moab. Ptolemy mentions a people named Sophonites, that dwelt in Arabia Petraea, and it is probable that they took their name from this place; but see the note from Lightfoot, Numbers 20., at the end.

    Paran] This could not have been the Paran which was contiguous to the Red Sea, and not far from Mount Horeb; for the place here mentioned lay on the very borders of the promised land, at a vast distance from the former.

    Dizahab.] The word should be separated, as it is in the Hebrew, bhz yd Di Zahab. As Zahab signifies gold, the Septuagint have translated it ta crusia, the gold mines; and the Vulgate ubi aurum est plurimum, where there is much gold. It is more likely to be the name of a place.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. These be the words which Moses spake unto all Israel , etc.] Not what are related in the latter part of the preceding book, but what follow in this; and which were spoken by him, not to the whole body of the people gathered together to hear him, which they could not do without a miracle; but to the heads of the people, the representatives of them, who were convened to hear what he had to say, in order to communicate it to the people; unless we can suppose that Moses at different times to several parties of them delivered the same things, until they had all heard them: on this side Jordan ; before the passage of the Israelites over it to the land of Canaan; for Moses never went in thither, and therefore it must be the tract which the Greeks call Persea, and which with respect to the Israelites when in the land of Canaan is called “beyond Jordan”, for here now Moses was; and the children of Israel had been here with him a considerable time in the wilderness, the vast wilderness of Arabia, which reached hither: in the plain ; the plains of Moab, between Bethjeshimoth and. Abelshittim, where the Israelites had lain encamped for some time, and had not as yet removed; (see Numbers 33:49) over against the Red [sea] : the word “sea” is not in the text, nor is there anything in it which answers to “Red”; it should be rendered “opposite Suph”, which seems to be the name of a place in Moab, not far from the plains of it, and perhaps is the same with Suphah in ( Numbers 21:14 *marg) for from the Red sea they were at a considerable distance: between Paran, and Tophel, and Laban, and Hazeroth, and Dizahab ; these are names of places which were the boundaries and limits of the plains of Moab, or lay very near them; for Paran cannot be understood of the Wilderness of Paran, which was too remote, but a city or town of that name. Tophel and Laban we read of nowhere else; a learned man f1 conjectures Tophel is the name of the station where the Israelites loathed the manna as light bread, because of the insipidness of it, which he observes this word signifies; but that station was either Zalmonah, or Punon, or this station must be omitted in the account of their journeys, and besides was too remote. Jarchi helps this conjecture a little, who puts Tophel and Laban together, and thinks they signify their murmuring because of the manna, which was white, as Laban signifies; but the above writer takes Laban to be a distinct station, the same with Libnah, ( Numbers 33:20), and Hazeroth to be the station between Mount Sinai and Kadesh, ( Numbers 12:16). But both seem to be too remote from the plains of Moab; and Dizahab he would have to be the same with Eziongaber, ( Numbers 33:35), which he says the Arabs now call Dsahab, or Meenah el Dsahab, that is, “the port of gold”; and certain it is that Dizahab has the signification of gold, and, is by Hillerus rendered “sufficiency of gold”, there being large quantities of it here; perhaps either through the riches of the port by trade, or by reason of a mine of gold at it, or near it; so the Vulgate Latin version renders it, “where there is much gold”, and the Septuagint version “golden mines”, Catachrysea; and Jerom makes mention of a place of this name, and says they are mountains abounding with gold in the wilderness, eleven miles from Horeb, where Moses is said to write Deuteronomy; elsewhere he calls it Dysmemoab, i.e. the west of Moab, near Jordan, opposite Jericho.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-8 -
    Moses spake to the people all the Lord had given him in commandment Horeb was but eleven days distant from Kadesh-barnea. This was to remind them that their own bad conduct had occasioned their tediou wanderings; that they might the more readily understand the advantage of obedience. They must now go forward. Though God brings his people into trouble and affliction, he knows when they have been tried lon enough. When God commands us to go forward in our Christian course, he sets the heavenly Canaan before us for our encouragement.


    Original Hebrew

    אלה 428 הדברים 1697 אשׁר 834 דבר 1696 משׁה 4872 אל 413 כל 3605 ישׂראל 3478 בעבר 5676 הירדן 3383 במדבר 4057 בערבה 6160 מול 4136 סוף 5489 בין 996 פארן 6290 ובין 996 תפל 8603 ולבן 3837 וחצרת 2698 ודי  זהב׃ 1774  


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET