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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Job 26:7


    CHAPTERS: Job 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Job 26:7

    εκτεινων βορεαν επ 1909 ' ουδεν 3762 κρεμαζων γην 1093 επι 1909 ουδενος 3762

    Douay Rheims Bible

    He stretched out the north
    over the empty space, and hangeth the earth upon nothing.

    King James Bible - Job 26:7

    He stretcheth out the north over the empty place, and hangeth the earth upon nothing.

    World English Bible

    He stretches out the north
    over empty space, and hangs the earth on nothing.

    Early Church Father Links

    Npnf-109 xix.xi Pg 36, Npnf-205 viii.ii.ii Pg 124

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Job 26:7

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    and all other things in succession; but neither gods nor angels [had any share in the work].


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxviii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    then the sun, and the moon, and the stars. For having learned this in Egypt, and having been much taken with what Moses had written in the Genesis of the world, he fabled that Vulcan had made in the shield of Achilles a kind of representation of the creation of the world. For he wrote thus:2568

    2568 Iliad, xviii. 483.

    “There he described the earth, the heaven, the sea, The sun that rests not, and the moon full-orb’d; There also, all the stars which round about, As with a radiant frontlet, bind the skies.”


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 2
    Gen. i. 1.

    for, as they maintain, by naming these four,—God, beginning, heaven, and earth,—he set forth their Tetrad. Indicating also its invisible and hidden nature, he said, “Now the earth was invisible and unformed.”2880

    2880


    Anf-02 iii.ii.v Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 17.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.iii Pg 11
    Gen. i. 1.

    and as long as He continued making, one after the other, those things of which He was to be the Lord, it merely mentions God.  “And God said,” “and God made,” “and God saw;”6160

    6160


    Anf-03 v.v.xix Pg 6
    Gen. i. 1.

    just as it would have said, “At last God made the heaven and the earth,” if God had created these after all the rest.  Now, if the beginning is a substance, the end must also be material. No doubt, a substantial thing6320

    6320 Substantivum aliquid.

    may be the beginning of some other thing which may be formed out of it; thus the clay is the beginning of the vessel, and the seed is the beginning of the plant. But when we employ the word beginning in this sense of origin, and not in that of order, we do not omit to mention also the name of that particular thing which we regard as the origin of the other. On the other hand,6321

    6321 De cetero.

    if we were to make such a statement as this, for example, “In the beginning the potter made a basin or a water-jug,” the word beginning will not here indicate a material substance (for I have not mentioned the clay, which is the beginning in this sense, but only the order of the work, meaning that the potter made the basin and the jug first, before anything else—intending afterwards to make the rest. It is, then, to the order of the works that the word beginning has reference, not to the origin of their substances. I might also explain this word beginning in another way, which would not, however, be inapposite.6322

    6322 Non ab re tamen.

    The Greek term for beginning, which is ἀρχή, admits the sense not only of priority of order, but of power as well; whence princes and magistrates are called ἀρχοντες. Therefore in this sense too, beginning may be taken for princely authority and power. It was, indeed, in His transcendent authority and power, that God made the heaven and the earth.


    Anf-03 v.v.xx Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    —“and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  All things were made by Him, and without Him nothing was made.”6333

    6333


    Anf-03 v.v.xxii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 1.

    I revere6345

    6345 Adoro: reverently admire.

    the fulness of His Scripture, in which He manifests to me both the Creator and the creation. In the gospel, moreover, I discover a Minister and Witness of the Creator, even His Word.6346

    6346


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 3
    Gen. i. 1.

    The Scripture, which at its very outset proposes to run through the order thereof tells us as its first information that it was created; it next proceeds to set forth what sort of earth it was.6367

    6367 Qualitatem ejus: unless this means “how He made it,” like the “qualiter fecerit” below.

    In like manner with respect to the heaven, it informs us first of its creation—“In the beginning God made the heaven:”6368

    6368


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    it then goes on to introduce its arrangement; how that God both separated “the water which was below the firmament from that which was above the firmament,”6369

    6369


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 29
    Cum cælo separavit: Gen. i. 1.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    They will have it, moreover, that he spoke of the second Tetrad, the offspring of the first, in this way—by naming an abyss and darkness, in which were also water, and the Spirit moving upon the water. Then, proceeding to mention the Decad, he names light, day, night, the firmament, the evening, the morning, dry land, sea, plants, and, in the tenth place, trees. Thus, by means of these ten names, he indicated the ten Æons. The power of the Duodecad, again, was shadowed forth by him thus:—He names the sun, moon, stars, seasons, years, whales, fishes, reptiles, birds, quadrupeds, wild beasts, and after all these, in the twelfth place, man. Thus they teach that the Triacontad was spoken of through Moses by the Spirit. Moreover, man also, being formed after the image of the power above, had in himself that ability which flows from the one source. This ability was seated in the region of the brain, from which four faculties proceed, after the image of the Tetrad above, and these are called: the first, sight, the second, hearing, the third, smell, and the fourth,2881

    2881 One of the senses was thus capriciously cancelled by these heretics.

    taste. And they say that the Ogdoad is indicated by man in this way: that he possesses two ears, the like number of eyes, also two nostrils, and a twofold taste, namely, of bitter and sweet. Moreover, they teach that the whole man contains the entire image of the Triacontad as follows: In his hands, by means of his fingers, he bears the Decad; and in his whole body the Duodecad, inasmuch as his body is divided into twelve members; for they portion that out, as the body of Truth is divided by them—a point of which we have already spoken.2882

    2882 See above, chap. xiv. 2.

    But the Ogdoad, as being unspeakable and invisible, is understood as hidden in the viscera.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvi Pg 11
    Gen. i. 2.

    Whose kingdom shall I wish to come—his, of whom I never heard as the king of glory; or His, in whose hand are even the hearts of kings? Who shall give me my daily4537

    4537


    Anf-03 v.v.xxiii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    For he resolves6350

    6350 Redigit in.

    the word earth into Matter, because that which is made out of it is the earth.  And to the word was he gives the same direction, as if it pointed to what had always existed unbegotten and unmade. It was without form, moreover, and void, because he will have Matter to have existed shapeless and confused, and without the finish of a maker’s hand.6351

    6351 Inconditam: we have combined the two senses of the word.

    Now these opinions of his I will refute singly; but first I wish to say to him, by way of general answer: We are of opinion that Matter is pointed at in these terms. But yet does the Scripture intimate that, because Matter was in existence before all, anything of like condition6352

    6352 Tale aliquid.

    was even formed out of it? Nothing of the kind. Matter might have had existence, if it so pleased—or rather if Hermogenes so pleased. It might, I say, have existed, and yet God might not have made anything out of it, either as it was unsuitable to Him to have required the aid of anything, or at least because He is not shown to have made anything out of Matter. Its existence must therefore be without a cause, you will say. Oh, no! certainly6353

    6353 Plane: ironical.

    not without cause. For even if the world were not made out of it, yet a heresy has been hatched there from; and a specially impudent one too, because it is not Matter which has produced the heresy, but the heresy has rather made Matter itself.


    Anf-03 v.v.xxv Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    Of course, if I were to ask, to which of the two earths the name earth is best suited,6361

    6361 Quæ cui nomen terræ accommodare debeat. This is literally a double question, asking about the fitness of the name, and to which earth it is best adapted.

    I shall be told that the earth which was made derived the appellation from that of which it was made, on the ground that it is more likely that the offspring should get its name from the original, than the original from the offspring. This being the case, another question presents itself to us, whether it is right and proper that this earth which God made should have derived its name from that out of which He made it? For I find from Hermogenes and the rest of the Materialist heretics,6362

    6362 He means those who have gone wrong on the eternity of matter.

    that while the one earth was indeed “without form, and void,” this one of ours obtained from God in an equal degree6363

    6363 Proinde.

    both form, and beauty, and symmetry; and therefore that the earth which was created was a different thing from that out of which it was created. Now, having become a different thing, it could not possibly have shared with the other in its name, after it had declined from its condition. If earth was the proper name of the (original) Matter, this world of ours, which is not Matter, because it has become another thing, is unfit to bear the name of earth, seeing that that name belongs to something else, and is a stranger to its nature. But (you will tell me) Matter which has undergone creation, that is, our earth, had with its original a community of name no less than of kind. By no means. For although the pitcher is formed out of the clay, I shall no longer call it clay, but a pitcher; so likewise, although electrum6364

    6364 A mixed metal, of the colour of amber.

    is compounded of gold and silver, I shall yet not call it either gold or silver, but electrum. When there is a departure from the nature of any thing, there is likewise a relinquishment of its name—with a propriety which is alike demanded by the designation and the condition. How great a change indeed from the condition of that earth, which is Matter, has come over this earth of ours, is plain even from the fact that the latter has received this testimony to its goodness in Genesis, “And God saw that it was good;”6365

    6365


    Anf-03 v.v.xxx Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    as if these blended6427

    6427 Confusæ.

    substances, presented us with arguments for his massive pile of Matter.6428

    6428 Massalis illius molis.

    Now, so discriminating an enumeration of certain and distinct elements (as we have in this passage), which severally designates “darkness,” “the deep,” “the Spirit of God,” “the waters,” forbids the inference that anything confused or (from such confusion) uncertain is meant. Still more, when He ascribed to them their own places,6429

    6429 Situs.

    darkness on the face of the deep,” “the Spirit upon the face of the waters,” He repudiated all confusion in the substances; and by demonstrating their separate position,6430

    6430 Dispositionem.

    He demonstrated also their distinction.  Most absurd, indeed, would it be that Matter, which is introduced to our view as “without form,” should have its “formless” condition maintained by so many words indicative of form,6431

    6431 Tot formarum vocabulis.

    without any intimation of what that confused body6432

    6432 Corpus confusionis.

    is, which must of course be supposed to be unique,6433

    6433 Unicum.

    since it is without form.6434

    6434 Informe.

    For that which is without form is uniform; but even6435

    6435 Autem.

    that which is without form, when it is blended together6436

    6436 Confusum.

    from various component parts,6437

    6437 Ex varietate.

    must necessarily have one outward appearance;6438

    6438 Unam speciem.

    and it has not any appearance, until it has the one appearance (which comes) from many parts combined.6439

    6439 Unam ex multis speciem.

    Now Matter either had those specific parts6440

    6440 Istas species.

    within itself, from the words indicative of which it had to be understood—I mean “darkness,” and “the deep,” and “the Spirit,” and “the waters”—or it had them not. If it had them, how is it introduced as being “without form?”6441

    6441 Non habens formas.

    If it had them not, how does it become known?6442

    6442 Agnoscitur.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 8
    De spiritu. This shows that Tertullian took the spirit of Gen. i. 2 in the inferior sense.

    also Amos says, “He that strengtheneth the thunder6462

    6462 So also the Septuagint.

    , and createth the wind, and declareth His Christ6463

    6463 So also the Septuagint.

    unto men;”6464

    6464


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 19
    Gen. i. 2.

    refers to Matter, as indeed do all those other Scriptures here and there,6473

    6473 In disperso.

    which demonstrate that the separate parts were made out of Matter. It must follow, then,6474

    6474 Ergo: Tertullian’s answer.

    that as earth consisted of earth, so also depth consisted of depth, and darkness of darkness, and the wind and waters of wind and waters. And, as we said above,6475

    6475 Ch. xxx., towards the end.

    Matter could not have been without form, since it had specific parts, which were formed out of it—although as separate things6476

    6476 Ut et aliæ.

    —unless, indeed, they were not separate, but were the very same with those out of which they came. For it is really impossible that those specific things, which are set forth under the same names, should have been diverse; because in that case6477

    6477 Jam.

    the operation of God might seem to be useless,6478

    6478 Otiosa.

    if it made things which existed already; since that alone would be a creation,6479

    6479 Generatio: creation in the highest sense of matter issuing from the maker. Another reading has “generosiora essent,” for our “generatio sola esset,” meaning that, “those things would be nobler which had not been made,” which is obviously quite opposed to Tertullian’s argument.

    when things came into being, which had not been (previously) made. Therefore, to conclude, either Moses then pointed to Matter when he wrote the words: “And darkness was on the face of the deep, and the spirit of God moved on the face of the waters;” or else, inasmuch as these specific parts of creation are afterwards shown in other passages to have been made by God, they ought to have been with equal explicitness6480

    6480 Æque.

    shown to have been made out of the Matter which, according to you, Moses had previously mentioned;6481

    6481 Præmiserat.

    or else, finally, if Moses pointed to those specific parts, and not to Matter, I want to know where Matter has been pointed out at all.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xcviii Pg 0


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 48
    It is Ps. xxii. in our Bibles, xxi. in LXX.

    “They dug,” He says, “my hands and feet1352

    1352


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Ps. xxii. 6–8.

    Ye see, beloved, what is the example which has been given us; for if the Lord thus humbled Himself, what shall we do who have through Him come under the yoke of His grace?


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xcviii Pg 0


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 48
    It is Ps. xxii. in our Bibles, xxi. in LXX.

    “They dug,” He says, “my hands and feet1352

    1352


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 23
    Ps. xxii. 16, 7, 8.

    Of what use now is (your tampering with) the testimony of His garments? If you take it as a booty for your false Christ, still all the Psalm (compensates) the vesture of Christ.5142

    5142 We append the original of these obscure sentences: “Quo jam testimonium vestimentorum? Habe falsi tui prædam; totus psalmus vestimenta sunt Christi.” The general sense is apparent. If Marcion does suppress the details about Christ’s garments at the cross, to escape the inconvenient proof they afford that Christ is the object of prophecies, yet there are so many other points of agreement between this wonderful Psalm and St. Luke’s history of the crucifixion (not expunged, as it would seem, by the heretic), that they quite compensate for the loss of this passage about the garments (Oehler).

    But, behold, the very elements are shaken. For their Lord was suffering. If, however, it was their enemy to whom all this injury was done, the heaven would have gleamed with light, the sun would have been even more radiant, and the day would have prolonged its course5143

    5143


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 13
    Ps. xxii. 8.

    “He was appraised by the traitor in thirty pieces of silver.”7406

    7406


    Anf-01 vi.ii.x Pg 11
    Ps. i. 1.

    even as the fishes [referred to] go in darkness to the depths [of the sea]; “and hath not stood in the way of sinners,” even as those who profess to fear the Lord, but go astray like swine; “and hath not sat in the seat of scorners,”1585

    1585 Literally, “of the pestilent.”

    even as those birds that lie in wait for prey. Take a full and firm grasp of this spiritual1586


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xi Pg 95.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xv Pg 19.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 21.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 iv.v.iii Pg 4
    Ps. i. 1. [Kaye’s censure of this use of the text, (p. 366) seems to me gratuitous.]

    Though he seems to have predicted beforehand of that just man, that he took no part in the meetings and deliberations of the Jews, taking counsel about the slaying of our Lord, yet divine Scripture has ever far-reaching applications: after the immediate sense has been exhausted, in all directions it fortifies the practice of the religious life, so that here also you have an utterance which is not far from a plain interdicting of the shows. If he called those few Jews an assembly of the wicked, how much more will he so designate so vast a gathering of heathens! Are the heathens less impious, less sinners, less enemies of Christ, than the Jews were then? And see, too, how other things agree. For at the shows they also stand in the way. For they call the spaces between the seats going round the amphitheatre, and the passages which separate the people running down, ways. The place in the curve where the matrons sit is called a chair. Therefore, on the contrary, it holds, unblessed is he who has entered any council of wicked men, and has stood in any way of sinners, and has sat in any chair of scorners. We may understand a thing as spoken generally, even when it requires a certain special interpretation to be given to it. For some things spoken with a special reference contain in them general truth. When God admonishes the Israelites of their duty, or sharply reproves them, He has surely a reference to all men; when He threatens destruction to Egypt and Ethiopia, He surely pre-condemns every sinning nation, whatever. If, reasoning from species to genus, every nation that sins against them is an Egypt and Ethiopia; so also, reasoning from genus to species, with reference to the origin of shows, every show is an assembly of the wicked.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1.

    Where then?  “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity;”2934

    2934


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 46
    Ps. i. 1.



    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.ix Pg 13
    Ps. i. 2.

    that they may be adorned with good works: for this is the meaning of the ruminants. The unclean, however, are those which do neither divide the hoof nor ruminate; that is, those persons who have neither faith in God, nor do meditate on His words: and such is the abomination of the Gentiles. But as to those animals which do indeed chew the cud, but have not the double hoof, and are themselves unclean, we have in them a figurative description of the Jews, who certainly have the words of God in their mouth, but who do not fix their rooted stedfastness in the Father and in the Son; wherefore they are an unstable generation. For those animals which have the hoof all in one piece easily slip; but those which have it divided are more sure-footed, their cleft hoofs succeeding each other as they advance, and the one hoof supporting the other. In like manner, too, those are unclean which have the double hoof but do not ruminate: this is plainly an indication of all heretics, and of those who do not meditate on the words of God, neither are adorned with works of righteousness; to whom also the Lord says, “Why call ye Me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say to you?”4504

    4504


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xv Pg 20.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 3
    Ps. i. 2.

    It was not in severity that its Author promulgated this law, but in the interest of the highest benevolence, which rather aimed at subduing2923

    2923 Edomantis, cf. chap. xv. sub fin. and xxix.

    the nation’s hardness of heart, and by laborious services hewing out a fealty which was (as yet) untried in obedience:  for I purposely abstain from touching on the mysterious senses of the law, considered in its spiritual and prophetic relation, and as abounding in types of almost every variety and sort.  It is enough at present, that it simply bound a man to God, so that no one ought to find fault with it, except him who does not choose to serve God. To help forward this beneficent, not onerous, purpose of the law, the prophets were also ordained by the self-same goodness of God, teaching precepts worthy of God, how that men should “cease to do evil, learn to do well, seek judgment, judge the fatherless,2924

    2924 Pupillo.

    and plead for the widow:”2925

    2925


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xvii Pg 7
    2 Kings xx. i.

    and restoring his kingly state to the monarch of Babylon after his complete repentance;2903

    2903


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xxix Pg 12
    See 2 Kings i.

    Prayer is alone that which vanquishes8955

    8955


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xvii Pg 7
    2 Kings xx. i.

    and restoring his kingly state to the monarch of Babylon after his complete repentance;2903

    2903


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xi Pg 10
    2 Kings xx. 3; 5.

    How ready to forgive Ahab, the husband of Jezebel, the blood of Naboth, when he deprecated His anger.5687

    5687


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xvii Pg 7
    2 Kings xx. i.

    and restoring his kingly state to the monarch of Babylon after his complete repentance;2903

    2903


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 32
    Isa. i. 8.

    With what constancy has He also, in Psalm xxx., laboured to present to us the very Christ! He calls with a loud voice to the Father, “Into Thine hands I commend my spirit,”5151

    5151


    Anf-03 vi.vii.xiv Pg 4
    Job. See Job 1; 2" id="vi.vii.xiv-p4.1" parsed="|Job|1|0|0|0;|Job|2|0|0|0" osisRef="Bible:Job.1 Bible:Job.2">Job i. and ii.

    —whom neither the driving away of his cattle nor those riches of his in sheep, nor the sweeping away of his children in one swoop of ruin, nor, finally, the agony of his own body in (one universal) wound, estranged from the patience and the faith which he had plighted to the Lord; whom the devil smote with all his might in vain. For by all his pains he was not drawn away from his reverence for God; but he has been set up as an example and testimony to us, for the thorough accomplishment of patience as well in spirit as in flesh, as well in mind as in body; in order that we succumb neither to damages of our worldly goods, nor to losses of those who are dearest, nor even to bodily afflictions.  What a bier9171

    9171 “Feretrum”—for carrying trophies in a triumph, the bodies of the dead, and their effigies, etc.

    for the devil did God erect in the person of that hero! What a banner did He rear over the enemy of His glory, when, at every bitter message, that man uttered nothing out of his mouth but thanks to God, while he denounced his wife, now quite wearied with ills, and urging him to resort to crooked remedies! How did God smile,9172

    9172


    Anf-01 viii.iv.l Pg 6
    Isa. xl. 1–17.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 40
    Isa. lxi. 3.

    Now since Christ, as soon as He entered on His course,3972

    3972 Statim admissus.

    fulfilled such a ministration as this, He is either, Himself, He who predicted His own coming to do all this; or else if he is not yet come who predicted this, the charge to Marcion’s Christ must be a ridiculous one (although I should perhaps add a necessary3973

    3973 Said in irony, as if Marcion’s Christ deserved the rejection.

    one), which bade him say, “Blessed shall ye be, when men shall hate you, and shall reproach you, and shall cast out your name as evil, for the Son of man’s sake.”3974

    3974


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxvi Pg 17
    Isa. lxv. 17, 18.

    Now this is what has been said by the apostle: “For the fashion of this world passeth away.”4780

    4780


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxv Pg 22
    Isa. lxv. 18.



    Anf-01 ix.vi.xv Pg 5
    Isa. xliii. 5.

    Inasmuch as then, “wheresoever the carcase is, there shall also the eagles be gathered together,”3964

    3964


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiii Pg 31
    Isa. xlix. 12.

    Concerning whom He says again: “Lift up thine eyes round about, and behold, all these have gathered themselves together.”3933

    3933


    Anf-03 vi.iii.xix Pg 9
    Jer. xxxi. 8, xxxviii. 8 in LXX., where ἐν ἑορτῇ φασέκ is found, which is not in the English version.

    However, every day is the Lord’s; every hour, every time, is apt for baptism: if there is a difference in the solemnity, distinction there is none in the grace.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxv Pg 16
    Jer. xxxi. 10, etc.

    Now, in the preceding book4760

    4760 See. iv. 8, 3.

    I have shown that all the disciples of the Lord are Levites and priests, they who used in the temple to profane the Sabbath, but are blameless.4761

    4761


    Anf-01 v.ii.ix Pg 10
    Ps. cxix. 1.

    Now the way is unerring, namely, Jesus Christ. For, says He, “I am the way and the life.”550

    550


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xii Pg 5.1


    Npnf-201 iv.viii.xvii Pg 11


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 12
    The Latin here departs entirely from the Greek text, and quotes as a saying of “the Son of God” the following precept, nowhere to be found in the New Testament: “Let us resist all iniquity, and hold it in hatred.” Hilgenfeld joins this clause to the former sentence.

    may find no means of entrance, let us flee from every vanity, let us utterly hate the works of the way of wickedness. Do not, by retiring apart, live a solitary life, as if you were already [fully] justified; but coming together in one place, make common inquiry concerning what tends to your general welfare. For the Scripture saith, “Woe to them who are wise to themselves, and prudent in their own sight!”1479

    1479


    Npnf-201 iv.vi.i.xxxviii Pg 9


    Npnf-201 iii.xv.ix Pg 19


    Npnf-201 iv.vi.i.xxxviii Pg 9


    Anf-01 ix.iv.x Pg 24
    Prov. v. 22.

    Therefore did the Spirit of God descend upon Him, [the Spirit] of Him who had promised by the prophets that He would anoint Him, so that we, receiving from the abundance of His unction, might be saved. Such, then, [is the witness] of Matthew.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xvi Pg 4.1
    *title


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxiv Pg 2
    Josh. v. 2; Isa. xxvi. 2, 3.

    that they may be a righteous nation, a people keeping faith, holding to the truth, and maintaining peace. Come then with me, all who fear God, who wish to see the good of Jerusalem. Come, let us go to the light of the Lord; for He has liberated His people, the house of Jacob. Come, all nations; let us gather ourselves together at Jerusalem, no longer plagued by war for the sins of her people. ‘For I was manifest to them that sought Me not; I was found of them that asked not for Me;’2007

    2007


    Anf-01 vi.ii.vi Pg 5
    Cod. Sin. has “believe.” Isa. viii. 14, Isa. xxviii. 16.

    in it shall live for ever.” Is our hope, then, upon a stone? Far from it. But [the language is used] inasmuch as He laid his flesh [as a foundation] with power; for He says, “And He placed me as a firm rock.”1497

    1497


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxii Pg 25
    Isa. xxviii. 16.

    So, then, we understand that His advent in human nature was not by the will of a man, but by the will of God.


    Anf-02 ii.iv.ix Pg 37.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 15
    See Rom. ix. 32, 33, with Isa. xxviii. 16; 1 Cor. i. 23; Gal. v. 11.

    if it had been nakedly predicted; and the more magnificent, the more to be adumbrated, that the difficulty of its intelligence might seek (help from) the grace of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiv Pg 8
    See reference 3 above, with Isa. xxviii. 16.

    after reprobation (on earth) taken up (into heaven) and raised sublime for the purpose of consummation,1451

    1451


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.v Pg 31
    Isa. xxviii. 16.

    This stumbling-stone Marcion retains still.5415

    5415


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 36
    Isa. xxviii. 16.

    Unless it be, that God professed Himself to be the builder up of an earthly work, that so He might not give any sign of His Christ, as destined to be the foundation of such as believe in Him, upon which every man should build at will the superstructure of either sound or worthless doctrine; forasmuch as it is the Creator’s function, when a man’s work shall be tried by fire, (or) when a reward shall be recompensed to him by fire; because it is by fire that the test is applied to the building which you erect upon the foundation which is laid by Him, that is, the foundation of His Christ.5459

    5459


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xli Pg 2
    Ps. xcvi. 1, etc. This last clause, which is not extant in our copies, either of the LXX, or of the Hebrew, Justin charged the Jews with erasing. See Dial. Tryph., c. 73. [Concerning the eighteen Jewish alterations, see Pearson on the Creed, art. iv. p. 335. Ed. London, 1824.]


    Anf-01 ix.vi.x Pg 4
    Ps. xcvi. 1.

    and Esaias, “Sing unto the Lord a new hymn. His beginning (initium), His name is glorified from the height of the earth: they declare His powers in the isles.”3902

    3902


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 7.1
    Repentance, men understand, so far as nature is able, to be an emotion of the mind arising from disgust8421

    8421 “Offensa sententiæ pejoris;” or possibly, “the miscarriage of some,” etc.

    at some previously cherished worse sentiment: that kind of men I mean which even we ourselves were in days gone by—blind, without the Lord’s light.  From the reason of repentance, however, they are just as far as they are from the Author of reason Himself. Reason, in fact, is a thing of God, inasmuch as there is nothing which God the Maker of all has not provided, disposed, ordained by reason—nothing which He has not willed should be handled and understood by reason. All, therefore, who are ignorant of God, must necessarily be ignorant also of a thing which is His, because no treasure-house8422

    8422 Thesaurus.

    at all is accessible to strangers. And thus, voyaging all the universal course of life without the rudder of reason, they know not how to shun the hurricane which is impending over the world.8423

    8423 Sæculo. [Erasmus doubted the genuineness of this treatise, partly because of the comparative purity of its style. See Kaye, p. 42.]

    Moreover, how irrationally they behave in the practice of repentance, it will be enough briefly to show just by this one fact, that they exercise it even in the case of their good deeds. They repent of good faith, of love, of simple-heartedness, of patience, of mercy, just in proportion as any deed prompted by these feelings has fallen on thankless soil.  They execrate their own selves for having done good; and that species chiefly of repentance which is applied to the best works they fix in their heart, making it their care to remember never again to do a good turn. On repentance for evil deeds, on the contrary, they lay lighter stress. In short, they make this same (virtue) a means of sinning more readily than a means of right-doing.


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 33


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 9


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-01 ix.vi.x Pg 5
    Isa. xlii. 10, quoted from memory.

    And Jeremiah says: “Behold, I will make a new covenant, not as I made with your fathers”3903

    3903


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 22.1


    ecf19Oz105z77; 103:2


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xxvii Pg 7.1


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxxi Pg 2
    Deut. xxxii. 7 ff.

    And having said this, I added: “The Seventy have translated it, ‘He set the bounds of the nations according to the number of the angels of God.’ But because my argument is again in nowise weakened by this, I have adopted your exposition. And you yourselves, if you will confess the truth, must acknowledge that we, who have been called by God through the despised and shameful mystery of the cross (for the confession of which, and obedience to which, and for our piety, punishments even to death have been inflicted on us by demons, and by the host of the devil, through the aid ministered to them by you), and endure all torments rather than deny Christ even by word, through whom we are called to the salvation prepared beforehand by the Father, are more faithful to God than you, who were redeemed from Egypt with a high hand and a visitation of great glory, when the sea was parted for you, and a passage left dry, in which [God] slew those who pursued you with a very great equipment, and splendid chariots, bringing back upon them the sea which had been made a way for your sakes; on whom also a pillar of light shone, in order that you, more than any other nation in the world, might possess a peculiar light, never-failing and never-setting; for whom He rained manna as nourishment, fit for the heavenly angels, in order that you might have no need to prepare your food; and the water at Marah was made sweet; and a sign of Him that was to be crucified was made, both in the matter of the serpents which bit you, as I already mentioned (God anticipating before the proper times these mysteries, in order to confer grace upon you, to whom you are always convicted of being thankless), as well as in the type of the extending of the hands of Moses, and of <index subject1="Christ Jesus" title="265" id="viii.iv.cxxxi-p2.2"/><index subject1="Christ Jesus" subject2="figures of: Joshua" title="265" id="viii.iv.cxxxi-p2.3"/>Oshea being named Jesus (Joshua); when you fought against Amalek: concerning which God enjoined that the incident be recorded, and the name of Jesus laid up in your understandings; saying that this is He who would blot out the memorial of Amalek from under heaven. <index subject1="Types of Christ" title="265" id="viii.iv.cxxxi-p2.4"/>Now it is clear that the memorial of Amalek remained after the son of Nave (Nun): but He makes it manifest through Jesus, who was crucified, of whom also those symbols were fore-announcements of all that would happen to Him, the demons would be destroyed, and would dread His name, and that all principalities and kingdoms would fear Him; and that they who believe in Him out of all nations would be shown as God-fearing and peaceful men; and the facts already quoted by me, Trypho, indicate this. Again, when you desired flesh, so vast a quantity of quails was given you, that they could not be told; for whom also water gushed from the rock; and a cloud followed you for a shade from heat, and covering from cold, declaring the manner and signification of another and new heaven; the latchets of your shoes did not break, and your shoes waxed not old, and your garments wore not away, but even those of the children grew along with them.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.i Pg 25
    Isa. xliii. 18, 19.

    So by Jeremiah: “Break up for yourselves new pastures,3500

    3500 Novate novamen novum. Agricultural words.

    and sow not among thorns, and circumcise yourselves in the foreskin of your heart.”3501

    3501


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.ii Pg 5
    Comp. Isa. xliii. 18, 19, and lxv. 17, with 2 Cor. v. 17.

    to be superseded by a new course of things which should arise, whilst Christ marks the period of the separation when He says, “The law and the prophets were until John”5239

    5239


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 40
    Isa. xliii. 18, 19, and lxv. 17; 2 Cor. v. 17.

    commanded men “to break up fresh ground for themselves,”6095

    6095


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 99
    Isa. xliii. 19–21.

    —plainly announced that liberty which distinguishes the new covenant, and the new wine which is put into new bottles,4337

    4337


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.i Pg 25
    Isa. xliii. 18, 19.

    So by Jeremiah: “Break up for yourselves new pastures,3500

    3500 Novate novamen novum. Agricultural words.

    and sow not among thorns, and circumcise yourselves in the foreskin of your heart.”3501

    3501


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.ii Pg 5
    Comp. Isa. xliii. 18, 19, and lxv. 17, with 2 Cor. v. 17.

    to be superseded by a new course of things which should arise, whilst Christ marks the period of the separation when He says, “The law and the prophets were until John”5239

    5239


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 40
    Isa. xliii. 18, 19, and lxv. 17; 2 Cor. v. 17.

    commanded men “to break up fresh ground for themselves,”6095

    6095


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xx Pg 9
    Isa. xliii. 19.

    And in another passage: “I will make a new covenant, not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers, when I brought them out of the land of Egypt.”2560

    2560


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xi Pg 31
    His reading of (probably) Isa. xliii. 19; comp. 2 Cor. v. 17.

    does He not advert to a new state of things?  We have generally been of opinion3840

    3840 Olim statuimus.

    that the destination of the former state of things was rather promised by the Creator, and exhibited in reality by Christ, only under the authority of one and the same God, to whom appertain both the old things and the new. For new wine is not put into old bottles, except by one who has the old bottles; nor does anybody put a new piece to an old garment, unless the old garment be forthcoming to him. That person only3841

    3841 Ille.

    does not do a thing when it is not to be done, who has the materials wherewithal to do it if it were to be done.  And therefore, since His object in making the comparison was to show that He was separating the new condition3842

    3842 Novitas.

    of the gospel from the old state3843

    3843 Vetustas.

    of the law, He proved that that3844

    3844 That is, “the oldness of the law.”

    from which He was separating His own3845

    3845 That is, “the newness of the gospel.”

    ought not to have been branded3846

    3846 Notandam.

    as a separation3847

    3847 Separatione. The more general reading is separationem.

    of things which were alien to each other; for nobody ever unites his own things with things that are alien to them,3848

    3848 Alienis: i.e., “things not his own.”

    in order that he may afterwards be able to separate them from the alien things. A separation is possible by help of the conjunction through which it is made.  Accordingly, the things which He separated He also proved to have been once one; as they would have remained, were it not for His separation. But still we make this concession, that there is a separation, by reformation, by amplification,3849

    3849 Amplitudinem.

    by progress; just as the fruit is separated from the seed, although the fruit comes from the seed. So likewise the gospel is separated from the law, whilst it advances3850

    3850 Provehitur, “is developed.”

    from the law—a different thing3851

    3851 Aliud.

    from it, but not an alien one; diverse, but not contrary. Nor in Christ do we even find any novel form of discourse. Whether He proposes similitudes or refute questions, it comes from the seventy-seventh Psalm.  “I will open,” says He, “my mouth in a parable” (that is, in a similitude); “I will utter dark problems” (that is, I will set forth questions).3852

    3852


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xii Pg 29
    Isa. xliii. 19.

    When also he (in a later passage) enjoins us “to cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of flesh and blood5767

    5767


    Anf-01 v.xiv.vi Pg 11
    Prov. viii. 22, 23; 25.


    Anf-03 v.v.xlv Pg 3
    Prov. viii. 22, 23.

    Then that the Word was produced, “through whom all things were made, and without whom nothing was made.”6594

    6594


    Anf-01 v.xiv.vi Pg 3
    Prov. viii. 27; 30.

    And how could a mere man be addressed in such words as these: “Sit Thou at My right hand?”1198

    1198


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxvi Pg 9
    Justin puts “sun and moon” instead of “Lucifer.” [Ps. cx. 3, Sept, compounded with Prov. viii. 27.] Maranus says, David did predict, not that Christ would be born of Mary before sun and moon, but that it would happen before sun and moon that He would be born of a virgin.

    according to the Father’s will, and made Him known, being Christ, as God strong and to be worshipped.”


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 15
    Prov. viii. 27–31.


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 8
    Ver. 27.

    Thus does He make Him equal to Him: for by proceeding from Himself He became His first-begotten Son, because begotten before all things;7829

    7829


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 3
    Prov. viii. 27.

    —even though the apostle asks, “Who hath known the mind of the Lord, or who hath been His counsellor?”7990

    7990


    Anf-03 v.ix.vi Pg 7
    Prov. viii. 27–30.

    Now, as soon as it pleased God to put forth into their respective substances and forms the things which He had planned and ordered within Himself, in conjunction with His Wisdom’s Reason and Word, He first put forth the Word Himself, having within Him His own inseparable Reason and Wisdom, in order that all things might be made through Him through whom they had been planned and disposed, yea, and already made, so far forth as (they were) in the mind and intelligence of God. This, however, was still wanting to them, that they should also be openly known, and kept permanently in their proper forms and substances.


    Anf-03 v.v.xviii Pg 11
    Prov. viii. 27–31.

    Now, who would not rather approve of6300

    6300 Commendet.

    this as the fountain and origin of all things—of this as, in very deed, the Matter of all Matter, not liable to any end,6301

    6301 “Non fini subditam” is Oehler’s better reading than the old “sibi subditam.”

    not diverse in condition, not restless in motion, not ungraceful in form, but natural, and proper, and duly proportioned, and beautiful, such truly as even God might well have required, who requires His own and not another’s? Indeed, as soon as He perceived It to be necessary for His creation of the world, He immediately creates It, and generates It in Himself. “The Lord,” says the Scripture, “possessed6302

    6302 Condidit: created.

    me, the beginning of His ways for the creation of His works. Before the worlds He founded me; before He made the earth, before the mountains were settled in their places; moreover, before the hills He generated me, and prior to the depths was I begotten.”6303

    6303


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxxi Pg 3
    Isa. xl. 12; 22.

    of the earth, as it were, in His hand, in whose sight its inhabitants are counted as grasshoppers, and who is the Creator and Lord of all spiritual substance, is of an animal nature,—they do beyond doubt and verily betray their own madness; and, as if truly struck with thunder, even more than those giants who are spoken of in [heathen] fables, they lift up their opinions against God, inflated by a vain presumption and unstable glory,—men for whose purgation all the hellebore3247

    3247 Irenæus was evidently familiar with Horace; comp. Ars. Poet., 300.

    on earth would not suffice, so that they should get rid of their intense folly.


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xiii Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.iii Pg 15.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 5
    Isa. xlii. 5.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xiii Pg 4
    Isa. xlii. 5.

    thus telling us that breath is indeed given in common to all people upon earth, but that the Spirit is theirs alone who tread down earthly desires. And therefore Isaiah himself, distinguishing the things already mentioned, again exclaims, “For the Spirit shall go forth from Me, and I have made every breath.”4533

    4533


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxv Pg 7
    Isa. xlii. 5–13.

    And when I repeated this, I said to them, “Have you perceived, my friends, that God says He will give Him whom He has established as a light of the Gentiles, glory, and to no other; and not, as Trypho said, that God was retaining the glory to Himself?”


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 5.1


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xi Pg 7
    Isa. xlii. 5.

    First of all there comes the (natural) soul, that is to say, the breath, to the people that are on the earth,—in other words, to those who act carnally in the flesh; then afterwards comes the Spirit to those who walk thereon,—that is, who subdue the works of the flesh; because the apostle also says, that “that is not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural, (or in possession of the natural soul,) and afterward that which is spiritual.”1566

    1566


    Edersheim Bible History

    Lifetimes xi.v Pg 67.1


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 26

    VERSE 	(7) - 

    Job 9:8 Ge 1:1,2 Ps 24:2; 104:2-5 Pr 8:23-27 Isa 40:22,26; 42:5


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET