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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Job 9:8


    CHAPTERS: Job 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Job 9:8

    ο 3588 3739 τανυσας τον 3588 ουρανον 3772 μονος 3441 και 2532 περιπατων 4043 5723 ως 5613 επ 1909 ' εδαφους επι 1909 θαλασσης 2281

    Douay Rheims Bible

    Who alone spreadeth out the heavens, and walketh upon the waves of the sea.

    King James Bible - Job 9:8

    Which alone spreadeth out the heavens, and treadeth upon the waves of the sea.

    World English Bible

    He alone stretches out the heavens, and treads on the waves of the sea.

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-07 ix.ix.ii Pg 28, Npnf-114 iv.xlv Pg 49, Npnf-114 v.xlv Pg 49, Npnf-207 ii.xv Pg 136, Npnf-207 ii.xvii Pg 57, Npnf-208 ix.ix Pg 24, Npnf-210 iv.iv.vii.iii Pg 10

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Job 9:8

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-02 iv.ii.i.vi Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.ix.xii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 6, 7.

    and God also said, “Let there be lights (in the firmament); and so God made a greater and a lesser light.”7901

    7901


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 10
    Gen. i. 6, 7, 8.

    the suspension of “the dry land” He accomplished by “separating the waters.” After the world had been hereupon set in order through its elements, when inhabitants were given it, “the waters” were the first to receive the precept “to bring forth living creatures.”8559

    8559 Animas.

    Water was the first to produce that which had life, that it might be no wonder in baptism if waters know how to give life.8560

    8560 Animare.

    For was not the work of fashioning man himself also achieved with the aid of waters?  Suitable material is found in the earth, yet not apt for the purpose unless it be moist and juicy; which (earth) “the waters,” separated the fourth day before into their own place, temper with their remaining moisture to a clayey consistency. If, from that time onward, I go forward in recounting universally, or at more length, the evidences of the “authority” of this element which I can adduce to show how great is its power or its grace; how many ingenious devices, how many functions, how useful an instrumentality, it affords the world, I fear I may seem to have collected rather the praises of water than the reasons of baptism; although I should thereby teach all the more fully, that it is not to be doubted that God has made the material substance which He has disposed throughout all His products8561

    8561 Rebus.

    and works, obey Him also in His own peculiar sacraments; that the material substance which governs terrestrial life acts as agent likewise in the celestial.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 7
    Ver. 8.

    —the very thing He had created in the beginning.  Similarly it (afterwards) treats of man:  “And God created man, in the image of God made He him.”6371

    6371


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 10
    Gen. i. 6, 7, 8.

    the suspension of “the dry land” He accomplished by “separating the waters.” After the world had been hereupon set in order through its elements, when inhabitants were given it, “the waters” were the first to receive the precept “to bring forth living creatures.”8559

    8559 Animas.

    Water was the first to produce that which had life, that it might be no wonder in baptism if waters know how to give life.8560

    8560 Animare.

    For was not the work of fashioning man himself also achieved with the aid of waters?  Suitable material is found in the earth, yet not apt for the purpose unless it be moist and juicy; which (earth) “the waters,” separated the fourth day before into their own place, temper with their remaining moisture to a clayey consistency. If, from that time onward, I go forward in recounting universally, or at more length, the evidences of the “authority” of this element which I can adduce to show how great is its power or its grace; how many ingenious devices, how many functions, how useful an instrumentality, it affords the world, I fear I may seem to have collected rather the praises of water than the reasons of baptism; although I should thereby teach all the more fully, that it is not to be doubted that God has made the material substance which He has disposed throughout all His products8561

    8561 Rebus.

    and works, obey Him also in His own peculiar sacraments; that the material substance which governs terrestrial life acts as agent likewise in the celestial.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xli Pg 2
    Ps. xcvi. 1, etc. This last clause, which is not extant in our copies, either of the LXX, or of the Hebrew, Justin charged the Jews with erasing. See Dial. Tryph., c. 73. [Concerning the eighteen Jewish alterations, see Pearson on the Creed, art. iv. p. 335. Ed. London, 1824.]


    Anf-01 ix.vi.x Pg 4
    Ps. xcvi. 1.

    and Esaias, “Sing unto the Lord a new hymn. His beginning (initium), His name is glorified from the height of the earth: they declare His powers in the isles.”3902

    3902


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 7.1
    Repentance, men understand, so far as nature is able, to be an emotion of the mind arising from disgust8421

    8421 “Offensa sententiæ pejoris;” or possibly, “the miscarriage of some,” etc.

    at some previously cherished worse sentiment: that kind of men I mean which even we ourselves were in days gone by—blind, without the Lord’s light.  From the reason of repentance, however, they are just as far as they are from the Author of reason Himself. Reason, in fact, is a thing of God, inasmuch as there is nothing which God the Maker of all has not provided, disposed, ordained by reason—nothing which He has not willed should be handled and understood by reason. All, therefore, who are ignorant of God, must necessarily be ignorant also of a thing which is His, because no treasure-house8422

    8422 Thesaurus.

    at all is accessible to strangers. And thus, voyaging all the universal course of life without the rudder of reason, they know not how to shun the hurricane which is impending over the world.8423

    8423 Sæculo. [Erasmus doubted the genuineness of this treatise, partly because of the comparative purity of its style. See Kaye, p. 42.]

    Moreover, how irrationally they behave in the practice of repentance, it will be enough briefly to show just by this one fact, that they exercise it even in the case of their good deeds. They repent of good faith, of love, of simple-heartedness, of patience, of mercy, just in proportion as any deed prompted by these feelings has fallen on thankless soil.  They execrate their own selves for having done good; and that species chiefly of repentance which is applied to the best works they fix in their heart, making it their care to remember never again to do a good turn. On repentance for evil deeds, on the contrary, they lay lighter stress. In short, they make this same (virtue) a means of sinning more readily than a means of right-doing.


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 33


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 9


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-01 ix.vi.x Pg 5
    Isa. xlii. 10, quoted from memory.

    And Jeremiah says: “Behold, I will make a new covenant, not as I made with your fathers”3903

    3903


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 22.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 6
    1 Kings viii. 27.

    And he pleased God, and was the admiration of all; and all kings of the earth sought an interview with him (quærebant faciem ejus) that they might hear the wisdom which God had conferred upon him.4179

    4179


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 273.1
    119:90,91


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xx Pg 3
    Job xxxviii. 11.

    The ocean, impassable to man, and the worlds beyond it, are regulated by the same enactments of the Lord. The seasons of spring, summer, autumn, and winter, peacefully give place to one another. The winds in their several quarters89

    89 Or, “stations.”

    fulfil, at the proper time, their service without hindrance. The ever-flowing fountains, formed both for enjoyment and health, furnish without fail their breasts for the life of men. The very smallest of living beings meet together in peace and concord. All these the great Creator and Lord of all has appointed to exist in peace and harmony; while He does good to all, but most abundantly to us who have fled for refuge to His compassions through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom be glory and majesty for ever and ever. Amen.


    Anf-01 v.xiv.vi Pg 3
    Prov. viii. 27; 30.

    And how could a mere man be addressed in such words as these: “Sit Thou at My right hand?”1198

    1198


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxvi Pg 9
    Justin puts “sun and moon” instead of “Lucifer.” [Ps. cx. 3, Sept, compounded with Prov. viii. 27.] Maranus says, David did predict, not that Christ would be born of Mary before sun and moon, but that it would happen before sun and moon that He would be born of a virgin.

    according to the Father’s will, and made Him known, being Christ, as God strong and to be worshipped.”


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 15
    Prov. viii. 27–31.


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 8
    Ver. 27.

    Thus does He make Him equal to Him: for by proceeding from Himself He became His first-begotten Son, because begotten before all things;7829

    7829


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 3
    Prov. viii. 27.

    —even though the apostle asks, “Who hath known the mind of the Lord, or who hath been His counsellor?”7990

    7990


    Anf-03 v.ix.vi Pg 7
    Prov. viii. 27–30.

    Now, as soon as it pleased God to put forth into their respective substances and forms the things which He had planned and ordered within Himself, in conjunction with His Wisdom’s Reason and Word, He first put forth the Word Himself, having within Him His own inseparable Reason and Wisdom, in order that all things might be made through Him through whom they had been planned and disposed, yea, and already made, so far forth as (they were) in the mind and intelligence of God. This, however, was still wanting to them, that they should also be openly known, and kept permanently in their proper forms and substances.


    Anf-03 v.v.xviii Pg 11
    Prov. viii. 27–31.

    Now, who would not rather approve of6300

    6300 Commendet.

    this as the fountain and origin of all things—of this as, in very deed, the Matter of all Matter, not liable to any end,6301

    6301 “Non fini subditam” is Oehler’s better reading than the old “sibi subditam.”

    not diverse in condition, not restless in motion, not ungraceful in form, but natural, and proper, and duly proportioned, and beautiful, such truly as even God might well have required, who requires His own and not another’s? Indeed, as soon as He perceived It to be necessary for His creation of the world, He immediately creates It, and generates It in Himself. “The Lord,” says the Scripture, “possessed6302

    6302 Condidit: created.

    me, the beginning of His ways for the creation of His works. Before the worlds He founded me; before He made the earth, before the mountains were settled in their places; moreover, before the hills He generated me, and prior to the depths was I begotten.”6303

    6303


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxxviii Pg 2
    Isa. liv. 9 comes nearer to these words than any other passage; but still the exact quotation is not in Isaiah, or in any other part of Scripture. [It is quite probable that Isa. liv. 9 was thus misunderstood by the Jews, as Trypho seems to acquiesce.]

    By this which God said was meant that the mystery of saved men appeared in the deluge. For righteous Noah, along with the other mortals at the deluge, i.e., with his own wife, his three sons and their wives, being eight in number, were a symbol of the eighth day, wherein Christ appeared when He rose from the dead, for ever the first in power. For Christ, being the first-born of every creature, became again the chief of another race regenerated by Himself through water, and faith, and wood, containing the mystery of the cross; even as Noah was saved by wood when he rode over the waters with his household. Accordingly, when the prophet says, ‘I saved thee in the times of Noah,’ as I have already remarked, he addresses the people who are equally faithful to God, and possess the same signs. For when Moses had the rod in his hands, he led your nation through the sea. And you believe that this was spoken to your nation only, or to the land. But the whole earth, as the Scripture says, was inundated, and the water rose in height fifteen cubits above all the mountains: so that it is evident this was not spoken to the land, but to the people who obeyed Him: for whom also He had before prepared a resting-place in Jerusalem, as was previously demonstrated by all the symbols of the deluge; I mean, that by water, faith, and wood, those who are afore-prepared, and who repent of the sins which they have committed, shall escape from the impending judgment of God.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxxviii Pg 2
    Isa. liv. 9 comes nearer to these words than any other passage; but still the exact quotation is not in Isaiah, or in any other part of Scripture. [It is quite probable that Isa. liv. 9 was thus misunderstood by the Jews, as Trypho seems to acquiesce.]

    By this which God said was meant that the mystery of saved men appeared in the deluge. For righteous Noah, along with the other mortals at the deluge, i.e., with his own wife, his three sons and their wives, being eight in number, were a symbol of the eighth day, wherein Christ appeared when He rose from the dead, for ever the first in power. For Christ, being the first-born of every creature, became again the chief of another race regenerated by Himself through water, and faith, and wood, containing the mystery of the cross; even as Noah was saved by wood when he rode over the waters with his household. Accordingly, when the prophet says, ‘I saved thee in the times of Noah,’ as I have already remarked, he addresses the people who are equally faithful to God, and possess the same signs. For when Moses had the rod in his hands, he led your nation through the sea. And you believe that this was spoken to your nation only, or to the land. But the whole earth, as the Scripture says, was inundated, and the water rose in height fifteen cubits above all the mountains: so that it is evident this was not spoken to the land, but to the people who obeyed Him: for whom also He had before prepared a resting-place in Jerusalem, as was previously demonstrated by all the symbols of the deluge; I mean, that by water, faith, and wood, those who are afore-prepared, and who repent of the sins which they have committed, shall escape from the impending judgment of God.


    Anf-01 v.xiv.vi Pg 3
    Prov. viii. 27; 30.

    And how could a mere man be addressed in such words as these: “Sit Thou at My right hand?”1198

    1198


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxvi Pg 9
    Justin puts “sun and moon” instead of “Lucifer.” [Ps. cx. 3, Sept, compounded with Prov. viii. 27.] Maranus says, David did predict, not that Christ would be born of Mary before sun and moon, but that it would happen before sun and moon that He would be born of a virgin.

    according to the Father’s will, and made Him known, being Christ, as God strong and to be worshipped.”


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 15
    Prov. viii. 27–31.


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 8
    Ver. 27.

    Thus does He make Him equal to Him: for by proceeding from Himself He became His first-begotten Son, because begotten before all things;7829

    7829


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 3
    Prov. viii. 27.

    —even though the apostle asks, “Who hath known the mind of the Lord, or who hath been His counsellor?”7990

    7990


    Anf-03 v.ix.vi Pg 7
    Prov. viii. 27–30.

    Now, as soon as it pleased God to put forth into their respective substances and forms the things which He had planned and ordered within Himself, in conjunction with His Wisdom’s Reason and Word, He first put forth the Word Himself, having within Him His own inseparable Reason and Wisdom, in order that all things might be made through Him through whom they had been planned and disposed, yea, and already made, so far forth as (they were) in the mind and intelligence of God. This, however, was still wanting to them, that they should also be openly known, and kept permanently in their proper forms and substances.


    Anf-03 v.v.xviii Pg 11
    Prov. viii. 27–31.

    Now, who would not rather approve of6300

    6300 Commendet.

    this as the fountain and origin of all things—of this as, in very deed, the Matter of all Matter, not liable to any end,6301

    6301 “Non fini subditam” is Oehler’s better reading than the old “sibi subditam.”

    not diverse in condition, not restless in motion, not ungraceful in form, but natural, and proper, and duly proportioned, and beautiful, such truly as even God might well have required, who requires His own and not another’s? Indeed, as soon as He perceived It to be necessary for His creation of the world, He immediately creates It, and generates It in Himself. “The Lord,” says the Scripture, “possessed6302

    6302 Condidit: created.

    me, the beginning of His ways for the creation of His works. Before the worlds He founded me; before He made the earth, before the mountains were settled in their places; moreover, before the hills He generated me, and prior to the depths was I begotten.”6303

    6303


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxxi Pg 3
    Isa. xl. 12; 22.

    of the earth, as it were, in His hand, in whose sight its inhabitants are counted as grasshoppers, and who is the Creator and Lord of all spiritual substance, is of an animal nature,—they do beyond doubt and verily betray their own madness; and, as if truly struck with thunder, even more than those giants who are spoken of in [heathen] fables, they lift up their opinions against God, inflated by a vain presumption and unstable glory,—men for whose purgation all the hellebore3247

    3247 Irenæus was evidently familiar with Horace; comp. Ars. Poet., 300.

    on earth would not suffice, so that they should get rid of their intense folly.


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 3
    Isa. xl. 12.

    “Thus saith the Lord, Heaven is My throne, and the earth My footstool: what kind of house will ye build to Me, or what is the place of My rest?”1674

    1674


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xx Pg 3
    Isa. xl. 12.

    tell me the measure, and recount the endless multitude of cubits, explain to me the fulness, the breadth, the length, the height, the beginning and end of the measurement,—things which the heart of man understands not, neither does it comprehend them. For the heavenly treasuries are indeed great: God cannot be measured in the heart, and incomprehensible is He in the mind; He who holds the earth in the hollow of His hand. Who perceives the measure of His right hand? Who knoweth His finger? Or who doth understand His hand,—that hand which measures immensity; that hand which, by its own measure, spreads out the measure of the heavens, and which comprises in its hollow the earth with the abysses; which contains in itself the breadth, and length, and the deep below, and the height above of the whole creation; which is seen, which is heard and understood, and which is invisible? And for this reason God is “above all principality, and power, and dominion, and every name that is named,”4060

    4060


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 9.1


    Anf-03 v.v.xlv Pg 8
    Isa. xl. 12 and xlviii. 13.

    Do not be willing so to cover God with flattery, as to contend that He produced by His mere appearance and simple approach so many vast substances, instead of rather forming them by His own energies. For this is proved by Jeremiah when he says, “God hath made the earth by His power, He hath established the world by His wisdom, and hath stretched out the heaven by His understanding.”6599

    6599 Jer. li. 15.

    These are the energies by the stress of which He made this universe.6600

    6600


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxxi Pg 3
    Isa. xl. 12; 22.

    of the earth, as it were, in His hand, in whose sight its inhabitants are counted as grasshoppers, and who is the Creator and Lord of all spiritual substance, is of an animal nature,—they do beyond doubt and verily betray their own madness; and, as if truly struck with thunder, even more than those giants who are spoken of in [heathen] fables, they lift up their opinions against God, inflated by a vain presumption and unstable glory,—men for whose purgation all the hellebore3247

    3247 Irenæus was evidently familiar with Horace; comp. Ars. Poet., 300.

    on earth would not suffice, so that they should get rid of their intense folly.


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xiii Pg 5.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.ix.xii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 6, 7.

    and God also said, “Let there be lights (in the firmament); and so God made a greater and a lesser light.”7901

    7901


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 10
    Gen. i. 6, 7, 8.

    the suspension of “the dry land” He accomplished by “separating the waters.” After the world had been hereupon set in order through its elements, when inhabitants were given it, “the waters” were the first to receive the precept “to bring forth living creatures.”8559

    8559 Animas.

    Water was the first to produce that which had life, that it might be no wonder in baptism if waters know how to give life.8560

    8560 Animare.

    For was not the work of fashioning man himself also achieved with the aid of waters?  Suitable material is found in the earth, yet not apt for the purpose unless it be moist and juicy; which (earth) “the waters,” separated the fourth day before into their own place, temper with their remaining moisture to a clayey consistency. If, from that time onward, I go forward in recounting universally, or at more length, the evidences of the “authority” of this element which I can adduce to show how great is its power or its grace; how many ingenious devices, how many functions, how useful an instrumentality, it affords the world, I fear I may seem to have collected rather the praises of water than the reasons of baptism; although I should thereby teach all the more fully, that it is not to be doubted that God has made the material substance which He has disposed throughout all His products8561

    8561 Rebus.

    and works, obey Him also in His own peculiar sacraments; that the material substance which governs terrestrial life acts as agent likewise in the celestial.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.ix.xii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 6, 7.

    and God also said, “Let there be lights (in the firmament); and so God made a greater and a lesser light.”7901

    7901


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 6
    Gen. i. 7.

    and called the firmament heaven,6370

    6370


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xli Pg 2
    Ps. xcvi. 1, etc. This last clause, which is not extant in our copies, either of the LXX, or of the Hebrew, Justin charged the Jews with erasing. See Dial. Tryph., c. 73. [Concerning the eighteen Jewish alterations, see Pearson on the Creed, art. iv. p. 335. Ed. London, 1824.]


    Anf-01 ix.vi.x Pg 4
    Ps. xcvi. 1.

    and Esaias, “Sing unto the Lord a new hymn. His beginning (initium), His name is glorified from the height of the earth: they declare His powers in the isles.”3902

    3902


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 7.1
    Repentance, men understand, so far as nature is able, to be an emotion of the mind arising from disgust8421

    8421 “Offensa sententiæ pejoris;” or possibly, “the miscarriage of some,” etc.

    at some previously cherished worse sentiment: that kind of men I mean which even we ourselves were in days gone by—blind, without the Lord’s light.  From the reason of repentance, however, they are just as far as they are from the Author of reason Himself. Reason, in fact, is a thing of God, inasmuch as there is nothing which God the Maker of all has not provided, disposed, ordained by reason—nothing which He has not willed should be handled and understood by reason. All, therefore, who are ignorant of God, must necessarily be ignorant also of a thing which is His, because no treasure-house8422

    8422 Thesaurus.

    at all is accessible to strangers. And thus, voyaging all the universal course of life without the rudder of reason, they know not how to shun the hurricane which is impending over the world.8423

    8423 Sæculo. [Erasmus doubted the genuineness of this treatise, partly because of the comparative purity of its style. See Kaye, p. 42.]

    Moreover, how irrationally they behave in the practice of repentance, it will be enough briefly to show just by this one fact, that they exercise it even in the case of their good deeds. They repent of good faith, of love, of simple-heartedness, of patience, of mercy, just in proportion as any deed prompted by these feelings has fallen on thankless soil.  They execrate their own selves for having done good; and that species chiefly of repentance which is applied to the best works they fix in their heart, making it their care to remember never again to do a good turn. On repentance for evil deeds, on the contrary, they lay lighter stress. In short, they make this same (virtue) a means of sinning more readily than a means of right-doing.


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 33


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 9


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-01 ix.vi.x Pg 5
    Isa. xlii. 10, quoted from memory.

    And Jeremiah says: “Behold, I will make a new covenant, not as I made with your fathers”3903

    3903


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 22.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xiii Pg 2
    Jer. ix. 23, 24; 1 Cor. i. 31; 2 Cor. x. 17.

    ), being especially mindful of the words of the Lord Jesus which He spake, teaching us meekness and long-suffering. For thus He spoke: “Be ye merciful, that ye may obtain mercy; forgive, that it may be forgiven to you; as ye do, so shall it be done unto you; as ye judge, so shall ye be judged; as ye are kind, so shall kindness be shown to you; with what measure ye mete, with the same it shall be measured to you.”56

    56


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.vi Pg 43.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xi Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 36
    Jer. ix. 23, 24.

    Similarly against the daughters of Sion does He inveigh by Isaiah, when they were haughty through their pomp and the abundance of their riches,4016

    4016


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.v Pg 42
    By Jeremiah, chap. ix. 23, 24.

    Unless, forsooth, the Creator enjoined us to glory in the god of Marcion.


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xiii Pg 2
    Jer. ix. 23, 24; 1 Cor. i. 31; 2 Cor. x. 17.

    ), being especially mindful of the words of the Lord Jesus which He spake, teaching us meekness and long-suffering. For thus He spoke: “Be ye merciful, that ye may obtain mercy; forgive, that it may be forgiven to you; as ye do, so shall it be done unto you; as ye judge, so shall ye be judged; as ye are kind, so shall kindness be shown to you; with what measure ye mete, with the same it shall be measured to you.”56

    56


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 16
    Jer. ix. 24.

    He adds, “For in these things I delight, says the Lord,” but not in sacrifices, nor in holocausts, nor in oblations. For the people did not receive these precepts as of primary importance (principaliter), but as secondary, and for the reason already alleged, as Isaiah again says: “Thou hast not [brought to] Me the sheep of thy holocaust, nor in thy sacrifices hast thou glorified Me: thou hast not served Me in sacrifices, nor in [the matter of] frankincense hast thou done anything laboriously; neither hast thou bought for Me incense with money, nor have I desired the fat of thy sacrifices; but thou hast stood before Me in thy sins and in thine iniquities.”4020

    4020


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xi Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 36
    Jer. ix. 23, 24.

    Similarly against the daughters of Sion does He inveigh by Isaiah, when they were haughty through their pomp and the abundance of their riches,4016

    4016


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.v Pg 42
    By Jeremiah, chap. ix. 23, 24.

    Unless, forsooth, the Creator enjoined us to glory in the god of Marcion.


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxxi Pg 3
    Isa. xl. 12; 22.

    of the earth, as it were, in His hand, in whose sight its inhabitants are counted as grasshoppers, and who is the Creator and Lord of all spiritual substance, is of an animal nature,—they do beyond doubt and verily betray their own madness; and, as if truly struck with thunder, even more than those giants who are spoken of in [heathen] fables, they lift up their opinions against God, inflated by a vain presumption and unstable glory,—men for whose purgation all the hellebore3247

    3247 Irenæus was evidently familiar with Horace; comp. Ars. Poet., 300.

    on earth would not suffice, so that they should get rid of their intense folly.


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xiii Pg 5.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 5
    Isa. xlii. 5.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xiii Pg 4
    Isa. xlii. 5.

    thus telling us that breath is indeed given in common to all people upon earth, but that the Spirit is theirs alone who tread down earthly desires. And therefore Isaiah himself, distinguishing the things already mentioned, again exclaims, “For the Spirit shall go forth from Me, and I have made every breath.”4533

    4533


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxv Pg 7
    Isa. xlii. 5–13.

    And when I repeated this, I said to them, “Have you perceived, my friends, that God says He will give Him whom He has established as a light of the Gentiles, glory, and to no other; and not, as Trypho said, that God was retaining the glory to Himself?”


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 5.1


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xi Pg 7
    Isa. xlii. 5.

    First of all there comes the (natural) soul, that is to say, the breath, to the people that are on the earth,—in other words, to those who act carnally in the flesh; then afterwards comes the Spirit to those who walk thereon,—that is, who subdue the works of the flesh; because the apostle also says, that “that is not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural, (or in possession of the natural soul,) and afterward that which is spiritual.”1566

    1566


    Anf-03 v.v.vi Pg 6
    <index subject1="Kingdom of God looked for" title="76" id="v.v.vi-p6.1"/><index subject1="Ignatius" subject2="his desire for martyrdom" title="76" id="v.v.vi-p6.2"/>All the ends of the world, and all the kingdoms of this earth,864

    864 Literally, “this age.”

    shall profit me nothing. <index subject1="Life" title="76" id="v.v.vi-p7.1"/>It is better for me to die for the sake of Jesus Christ, than to reign over all the ends of the earth. “For what is a man profited, if he gain the whole world, but lose his own soul?” <index subject1="Christ" subject2="His person" title="76" id="v.v.vi-p7.2"/>I long after the Lord, the Son of the true God and Father, even Jesus Christ. Him I seek, who died for us and rose again. Pardon me, brethren: do not hinder me in attaining to life; for Jesus is the life of believers. Do not wish to keep me in a state of death,865

    865 Literally, “to die.”

    for life without Christ is death. While I desire to belong to God, do not ye give me over to the world. Suffer me to obtain pure light: when I have gone thither, I shall indeed be a man of God. <index subject1="Imitators" subject2="of Christ" title="76" id="v.v.vi-p8.1"/>Permit me to be an imitator of the passion of Christ, my God. If any one has Him within himself, let him consider what I desire, and let him have sympathy with me, as knowing how I am straitened.
    fire in me desiring to be fed;867

    867 Literally, “desiring material.”

    but there is within me a water that liveth and speaketh,868

    868


    Anf-03 v.ix.xviii Pg 6
    Isa. xliv. 24.



    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 13
    Isa. xliv. 24.

    because by the Word were the heavens established.8000

    8000


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 20
    Jer. x. 11.

    For, from the fact of his having subjoined their destruction, he shows them to be no gods at all. Elias, too, when all Israel was assembled at Mount Carmel, wishing to turn them from idolatry, says to them, “How long halt ye between two opinions?3346

    3346 Literally, “In both houghs,” in ambabus suffraginibus.

    If the Lord be God,3347

    3347 The old Latin translation has, “Si unus est Dominus Deus”—If the Lord God is one; which is supposed by the critics to have occurred through carelessness of the translator.

    follow Him.”3348

    3348


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 9

    VERSE 	(8) - 

    Job 37:18 Ge 1:6,7 Ps 33:6; 104:2,3 Isa 40:22; 42:5; 44:24 Jer 10:11


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET