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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Job 9:29


    CHAPTERS: Job 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Job 9:29

    επειδη 1894 δε 1161 ειμι 1510 5748 ασεβης 765 δια 1223 2203 τι 5100 2444 ουκ 3756 απεθανον 599 5627

    Douay Rheims Bible

    But if so also I am wicked, why have I laboured in vain?

    King James Bible - Job 9:29

    If I be wicked, why then labour I in vain?

    World English Bible

    I shall be condemned. Why then do I
    labor in vain?

    Early Church Father Links

    Npnf-206 vi.ix.II Pg 13

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Job 9:29

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xvii Pg 7
    2 Kings xx. i.

    and restoring his kingly state to the monarch of Babylon after his complete repentance;2903

    2903


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xi Pg 10
    2 Kings xx. 3; 5.

    How ready to forgive Ahab, the husband of Jezebel, the blood of Naboth, when he deprecated His anger.5687

    5687 *marg:


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iv Pg 40
    Ps. ii. 3; 2.

    All those, therefore, who had been delivered from the yoke of slavery he would earnestly have to obliterate the very mark of slavery—even circumcision, on the authority of the prophet’s prediction. He remembered how that Jeremiah had said, “Circumcise the foreskins of your heart;”5359

    5359


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 29
    Ps. ii. 2.

    —from ignorance of Him, of course. Now nothing can be expounded of another god which is applicable to the Creator; otherwise the apostle would not have been just in reproaching the Jews with ignorance in respect of a god of whom they knew nothing.  For where had been their sin, if they only maintained the righteousness of their own God against one of whom they were ignorant? But he exclaims: “O the depth of the riches and the wisdom of God; how unsearchable also are His ways!”5864

    5864


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 11
    Ps. ii. 2.

    that Lord must be another Being, against whose Christ were gathered together the kings and the rulers. And if, to quote another passage, “Thus saith the Lord to my Lord Christ,”8171

    8171


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxii Pg 9
    Comp. Ps. ii. 2, 3, with Acts iv. 25–30.

    What did the apostles thereupon suffer? You answer:  Every sort of iniquitous persecutions, from men that belonged indeed to that Creator who was the adversary of Him whom they were preaching. Then why does the Creator, if an adversary of Christ, not only predict that the apostles should incur this suffering, but even express His displeasure3407

    3407 Exprobrat.

    thereat? For He ought neither to predict the course of the other god, whom, as you contend, He knew not, nor to have expressed displeasure at that which He had taken care to bring about. “See how the righteous perisheth, and no man layeth it to heart; and how merciful men are taken away, and no man considereth. For the righteous man has been removed from the evil person.”3408

    3408


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 27


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 35
    *marg:


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xv Pg 7
    Ps. cxxxix. 23.

    “Why think ye evil in your hearts?”1588

    1588


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.viii Pg 48.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.xiv Pg 6
    Compare Ps. ii. 4.

    how was the evil one cut asunder,9173

    9173 i.e. with rage and disappointment.

    while Job with mighty equanimity kept scraping off9174

    9174


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vi Pg 34.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.iii Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 44
    Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11" id="v.iv.vi.vi-p44.1" parsed="|1Cor|3|19|3|20;|Job|5|13|0|0;|Ps|94|11|0|0" osisRef="Bible:1Cor.3.19-1Cor.3.20 Bible:Job.5.13 Bible:Ps.94.11">1 Cor. iii. 19, 20; Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11.

    For in general we may conclude for certain that he could not possibly have cited the authority of that God whom he was bound to destroy, since he would not teach for Him.5467

    5467 Si non illi doceret.

    “Therefore,” says he, “let no man glory in man;”5468

    5468


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 8
    1 Kings x. 1.

    she whom the Lord also referred to as one who should rise up in the judgment with the nations of those men who do hear His words, and do not believe in Him, and should condemn them, inasmuch as she submitted herself to the wisdom announced by the servant of God, while these men despised that wisdom which proceeded directly from the Son of God. For Solomon was a servant, but Christ is indeed the Son of God, and the Lord of Solomon. While, therefore, he served God without blame, and ministered to His dispensations, then was he glorified: but when he took wives from all nations, and permitted them to set up idols in Israel, the Scripture spake thus concerning him: “And King Solomon was a lover of women, and he took to himself foreign women; and it came to pass, when Solomon was old, his heart was not perfect with the Lord his God. And the foreign women turned away his heart after strange gods. And Solomon did evil in the sight of the Lord: he did not walk after the Lord, as did David his father. And the Lord was angry with Solomon; for his heart was not perfect with the Lord, as was the heart of David his father.”4181

    4181


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 9
    1 Kings xi. 1.

    The Scripture has thus sufficiently reproved him, as the presbyter remarked, in order that no flesh may glory in the sight of the Lord.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 9
    I am not acquainted with any such passage. Oehler refers to Isa. xlix. in his margin, but gives no verse, and omits to notice this passage of the present treatise in his index.

    Thus, therefore, before this temporal sabbath, there was withal an eternal sabbath foreshown and foretold; just as before the carnal circumcision there was withal a spiritual circumcision foreshown. In short, let them teach us, as we have already premised, that Adam observed the sabbath; or that Abel, when offering to God a holy victim, pleased Him by a religious reverence for the sabbath; or that Enoch, when translated, had been a keeper of the sabbath; or that Noah the ark-builder observed, on account of the deluge, an immense sabbath; or that Abraham, in observance of the sabbath, offered Isaac his son; or that Melchizedek in his priesthood received the law of the sabbath.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 14.1


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxxiii Pg 28
    See Bull’s Works, Vol. V., p. 381.

    I value it chiefly because it proves that the Greek Testament, elsewhere says, disjointedly, what is collected into 1 John v. 7. It is, therefore, Holy Scripture in substance, if not in the letter. What seems to me important, however, is the balance it gives to the whole context, and the defective character of the grammar and logic, if it be stricken out. In the Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate of the Old Testament we have a precisely similar case. Refer to Psa. xiii., alike in the Latin and the Greek, as compared with our English Version.8214

    8214


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxvi Pg 5
    Ps. i. 3.

    Again, the righteous is said to flourish like the palm-tree. God appeared from a tree to Abraham, as it is written, near the oak in Mamre. The people found seventy willows and twelve springs after crossing the Jordan.2290

    2290


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 11
    Ps. i. 3–6.

    Mark how He has described at once both the water and the cross. For these words imply, Blessed are they who, placing their trust in the cross, have gone down into the water; for, says He, they shall receive their reward in due time: then He declares, I will recompense them. But now He saith,1601

    1601 Cod. Sin. has, “what meaneth?”

    “Their leaves shall not fade.” This meaneth, that every word which proceedeth out of your mouth in faith and love shall tend to bring conversion and hope to many. Again, another prophet saith, “And the land of Jacob shall be extolled above every land.”1602

    1602


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 19.1


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 17
    Ps. i. 3.

    “He that hath clean hands and a pure heart, who hath not taken God’s name in vain, nor sworn deceitfully to his neighbour, he shall receive blessing from the Lord, and mercy from the God of his salvation.”2937

    2937


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 125.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 4
    Cod. Sin. has, “have dug a pit of death.” See Jer. ii. 12, 13.

    Is my holy hill Zion a desolate rock? For ye shall be as the fledglings of a bird, which fly away when the nest is removed.”1594


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxiv Pg 7
    Jer. ii. 13.



    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxl Pg 2
    Jer. ii. 13.

    But they are cisterns broken, and holding no water, which your own teachers have digged, as the Scripture also expressly asserts, ‘teaching for doctrines the commandments of men.’2483

    2483


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxv Pg 6
    Jer. ii. 13.

    out of earthly trenches, and drink putrid water out of the mire, fleeing from the faith of the Church lest they be convicted; and rejecting the Spirit, that they may not be instructed.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 23.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 32
    ὑδατος ζωῆς in the LXX. here (ed. Tischendorf, who quotes the Cod. Alex. as reading, however, ὑδατος ζῶντος). Comp. Rev. xxii. 1, 17, and xxi. 6; John vii. 37–39. (The reference, it will be seen, is still to Jer. ii. 10–13; but the writer has mixed up words of Amos therewith.)

    and they have digged for themselves worn-out tanks, which will not be able to contain water.” Undoubtedly, by not receiving Christ, the “fount of water of life,” they have begun to have “worn-out tanks,” that is, synagogues for the use of the “dispersions of the Gentiles,”1411

    1411


    Anf-01 ix.vi.vi Pg 10
    Ps. xlv. 16.

    Christ Himself, therefore, together with the Father, is the God of the living, who spake to Moses, and who was also manifested to the fathers.

    *margins


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xi Pg 20
    Isa. xii. 2.

    But as bringing salvation, thus: “God hath made known His salvation (salutare) in the sight of the heathen.”3412

    3412 *titles


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxviii Pg 0


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 2.2


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 7
    “Eructavit cor. meum Sermonem optimum” is Tertullian’s reading of Ps. xlv. 1, “My heart is inditing a good matter,” A.V., which the Vulgate, Ps. xliv. 1, renders by “Eructavit cor meum verbum bonum,” and the Septuagint by ᾽Εξηρεύξατο ἡ καρδία μου λόγον ἀγαθόν. This is a tolerably literal rendering of the original words, בוֹט רבָרָ יבִּלִ שׁהַרָ. In these words the Fathers used to descry an adumbration of the mystery of the Son’s eternal generation from the Father, and His coming forth in time to create the world.  See Bellarmine, On the Psalms (Paris ed. 1861), vol. i. 292. The Psalm is no doubt eminently Messianic, as both Jewish and Christian writers have ever held. See Perowne, The Psalms, vol. i. p. 216.  Bishop Bull reviews at length the theological opinions of Tertullian, and shows that he held the eternity of the Son of God, whom he calls “Sermo” or “Verbum Dei.” See Defensio Fidei Nicænæ (translation in the “Oxford Library of the Fathers,” by the translator of this work) vol. ii. 509–545. In the same volume, p. 482, the passage from the Psalm before us is similarly applied by Novatian: “Sic Dei Verbum processit, de quo dictum est, Eructavit cor meum Verbum bonum.” [See vol. ii. p. 98, this series: and Kaye, p. 515.]

    Let Marcion take hence his first lesson on the noble fruit of this truly most excellent tree. But, like a most clumsy clown, he has grafted a good branch on a bad stock. The sapling, however, of his blasphemy shall be never strong: it shall wither with its planter, and thus shall be manifested the nature of the good tree. Look at the total result: how fruitful was the Word! God issued His fiat, and it was done: God also saw that it was good;2744

    2744


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 7
    Ps. xlv. 1. [And see Vol. I. p. 213, supra.]

    This will be that “very good word” of blessing which is admitted to be the initiating principle of the New Testament, after the example of the Old. What is there, then, to wonder at, if He entered on His ministry with the very attributes3940

    3940 Affectibus.

    of the Creator, who ever in language of the same sort loved, consoled, protected, and avenged the beggar, and the poor, and the humble, and the widow, and the orphan? So that you may believe this private bounty as it were of Christ to be a rivulet streaming from the springs of salvation. Indeed, I hardly know which way to turn amidst so vast a wealth of good words like these; as if I were in a forest, or a meadow, or an orchard of apples. I must therefore look out for such matter as chance may present to me.3941

    3941 Prout incidit.


    Anf-03 v.v.xviii Pg 24
    On this version of Ps. xlv. 1., and its application by Tertullian, see our Anti-Marcion (p. 299, note 5).

    ), I am not quite sure that evil may not be introduced by good, the stronger by the weak, in the same way as the unbegotten is by the begotten. Therefore on this ground Hermogenes puts Matter even before God, by putting it before the Son. Because the Son is the Word, and “the Word is God,”6313

    6313


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 10
    Ps. xlv. 1. See this reading, and its application, fully discussed in our note 5, p. 66, of the Anti-Marcion, Edin.

    The Father took pleasure evermore in Him, who equally rejoiced with a reciprocal gladness in the Father’s presence:  “Thou art my Son, to-day have I begotten Thee;”7831

    7831


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 4
    For this version of Ps. xlv. 1, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 66, note 5, Edin.

    so you in like manner ought to adduce in opposition to me some text where God has said, “My heart hath emitted Myself as my own most excellent Word,” in such a sense that He is Himself both the Emitter and the Emitted, both He who sent forth and He who was sent forth, since He is both the Word and God. I bid you also observe,7877

    7877 Ecce.

    that on my side I advance the passage where the Father said to the Son, “Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten Thee.”7878

    7878 *title *titles


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxviii Pg 0


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 2.2


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 7
    “Eructavit cor. meum Sermonem optimum” is Tertullian’s reading of Ps. xlv. 1, “My heart is inditing a good matter,” A.V., which the Vulgate, Ps. xliv. 1, renders by “Eructavit cor meum verbum bonum,” and the Septuagint by ᾽Εξηρεύξατο ἡ καρδία μου λόγον ἀγαθόν. This is a tolerably literal rendering of the original words, בוֹט רבָרָ יבִּלִ שׁהַרָ. In these words the Fathers used to descry an adumbration of the mystery of the Son’s eternal generation from the Father, and His coming forth in time to create the world.  See Bellarmine, On the Psalms (Paris ed. 1861), vol. i. 292. The Psalm is no doubt eminently Messianic, as both Jewish and Christian writers have ever held. See Perowne, The Psalms, vol. i. p. 216.  Bishop Bull reviews at length the theological opinions of Tertullian, and shows that he held the eternity of the Son of God, whom he calls “Sermo” or “Verbum Dei.” See Defensio Fidei Nicænæ (translation in the “Oxford Library of the Fathers,” by the translator of this work) vol. ii. 509–545. In the same volume, p. 482, the passage from the Psalm before us is similarly applied by Novatian: “Sic Dei Verbum processit, de quo dictum est, Eructavit cor meum Verbum bonum.” [See vol. ii. p. 98, this series: and Kaye, p. 515.]

    Let Marcion take hence his first lesson on the noble fruit of this truly most excellent tree. But, like a most clumsy clown, he has grafted a good branch on a bad stock. The sapling, however, of his blasphemy shall be never strong: it shall wither with its planter, and thus shall be manifested the nature of the good tree. Look at the total result: how fruitful was the Word! God issued His fiat, and it was done: God also saw that it was good;2744

    2744


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 7
    Ps. xlv. 1. [And see Vol. I. p. 213, supra.]

    This will be that “very good word” of blessing which is admitted to be the initiating principle of the New Testament, after the example of the Old. What is there, then, to wonder at, if He entered on His ministry with the very attributes3940

    3940 Affectibus.

    of the Creator, who ever in language of the same sort loved, consoled, protected, and avenged the beggar, and the poor, and the humble, and the widow, and the orphan? So that you may believe this private bounty as it were of Christ to be a rivulet streaming from the springs of salvation. Indeed, I hardly know which way to turn amidst so vast a wealth of good words like these; as if I were in a forest, or a meadow, or an orchard of apples. I must therefore look out for such matter as chance may present to me.3941

    3941 Prout incidit.


    Anf-03 v.v.xviii Pg 24
    On this version of Ps. xlv. 1., and its application by Tertullian, see our Anti-Marcion (p. 299, note 5).

    ), I am not quite sure that evil may not be introduced by good, the stronger by the weak, in the same way as the unbegotten is by the begotten. Therefore on this ground Hermogenes puts Matter even before God, by putting it before the Son. Because the Son is the Word, and “the Word is God,”6313

    6313


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 10
    Ps. xlv. 1. See this reading, and its application, fully discussed in our note 5, p. 66, of the Anti-Marcion, Edin.

    The Father took pleasure evermore in Him, who equally rejoiced with a reciprocal gladness in the Father’s presence:  “Thou art my Son, to-day have I begotten Thee;”7831

    7831


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 4
    For this version of Ps. xlv. 1, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 66, note 5, Edin.

    so you in like manner ought to adduce in opposition to me some text where God has said, “My heart hath emitted Myself as my own most excellent Word,” in such a sense that He is Himself both the Emitter and the Emitted, both He who sent forth and He who was sent forth, since He is both the Word and God. I bid you also observe,7877

    7877 Ecce.

    that on my side I advance the passage where the Father said to the Son, “Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten Thee.”7878

    7878 *title *titles


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 5
    Isa. iii. 13.

    For in the person of Pilate “the heathen raged,” and in the person of Israel “the people imagined vain things;” “the kings of the earth” in Herod, and the rulers in Annas and Caiaphas, were gathered together “against the Lord, and against His anointed.”7398

    7398


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 9
    Isa. iii. 13, 14 (Septuagint).

    And then He fulfilled all that had been written of His passion. At that time “the heathen raged, and the people imagined vain things; the kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers gathered themselves together against the Lord and against His Christ.”5128

    5128


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.iv Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.viii.lviii Pg 3
    Isa. xxxv. 10.

    Well, there is nothing eternal until after the resurrection. “And sorrow and sighing,” continues he, “shall flee away.”7729

    7729


    Anf-03 v.viii.lviii Pg 4
    Ver. 10.

    The angel echoes the same to John: “And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes;”7730

    7730


    Anf-01 vi.ii.x Pg 11
    Ps. i. 1.

    even as the fishes [referred to] go in darkness to the depths [of the sea]; “and hath not stood in the way of sinners,” even as those who profess to fear the Lord, but go astray like swine; “and hath not sat in the seat of scorners,”1585

    1585 Literally, “of the pestilent.”

    even as those birds that lie in wait for prey. Take a full and firm grasp of this spiritual1586


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xi Pg 95.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xv Pg 19.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 21.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 iv.v.iii Pg 4
    Ps. i. 1. [Kaye’s censure of this use of the text, (p. 366) seems to me gratuitous.]

    Though he seems to have predicted beforehand of that just man, that he took no part in the meetings and deliberations of the Jews, taking counsel about the slaying of our Lord, yet divine Scripture has ever far-reaching applications: after the immediate sense has been exhausted, in all directions it fortifies the practice of the religious life, so that here also you have an utterance which is not far from a plain interdicting of the shows. If he called those few Jews an assembly of the wicked, how much more will he so designate so vast a gathering of heathens! Are the heathens less impious, less sinners, less enemies of Christ, than the Jews were then? And see, too, how other things agree. For at the shows they also stand in the way. For they call the spaces between the seats going round the amphitheatre, and the passages which separate the people running down, ways. The place in the curve where the matrons sit is called a chair. Therefore, on the contrary, it holds, unblessed is he who has entered any council of wicked men, and has stood in any way of sinners, and has sat in any chair of scorners. We may understand a thing as spoken generally, even when it requires a certain special interpretation to be given to it. For some things spoken with a special reference contain in them general truth. When God admonishes the Israelites of their duty, or sharply reproves them, He has surely a reference to all men; when He threatens destruction to Egypt and Ethiopia, He surely pre-condemns every sinning nation, whatever. If, reasoning from species to genus, every nation that sins against them is an Egypt and Ethiopia; so also, reasoning from genus to species, with reference to the origin of shows, every show is an assembly of the wicked.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1.

    Where then?  “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity;”2934

    2934


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 46
    Ps. i. 1.



    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxvi Pg 5
    Ps. i. 3.

    Again, the righteous is said to flourish like the palm-tree. God appeared from a tree to Abraham, as it is written, near the oak in Mamre. The people found seventy willows and twelve springs after crossing the Jordan.2290

    2290


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 11
    Ps. i. 3–6.

    Mark how He has described at once both the water and the cross. For these words imply, Blessed are they who, placing their trust in the cross, have gone down into the water; for, says He, they shall receive their reward in due time: then He declares, I will recompense them. But now He saith,1601

    1601 Cod. Sin. has, “what meaneth?”

    “Their leaves shall not fade.” This meaneth, that every word which proceedeth out of your mouth in faith and love shall tend to bring conversion and hope to many. Again, another prophet saith, “And the land of Jacob shall be extolled above every land.”1602

    1602


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 19.1


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 17
    Ps. i. 3.

    “He that hath clean hands and a pure heart, who hath not taken God’s name in vain, nor sworn deceitfully to his neighbour, he shall receive blessing from the Lord, and mercy from the God of his salvation.”2937

    2937


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-01 v.ii.ix Pg 10
    Ps. cxix. 1.

    Now the way is unerring, namely, Jesus Christ. For, says He, “I am the way and the life.”550

    550


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xiii Pg 2
    Jer. ix. 23, 24; 1 Cor. i. 31; 2 Cor. x. 17.

    ), being especially mindful of the words of the Lord Jesus which He spake, teaching us meekness and long-suffering. For thus He spoke: “Be ye merciful, that ye may obtain mercy; forgive, that it may be forgiven to you; as ye do, so shall it be done unto you; as ye judge, so shall ye be judged; as ye are kind, so shall kindness be shown to you; with what measure ye mete, with the same it shall be measured to you.”56

    56


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 16
    Jer. ix. 24.

    He adds, “For in these things I delight, says the Lord,” but not in sacrifices, nor in holocausts, nor in oblations. For the people did not receive these precepts as of primary importance (principaliter), but as secondary, and for the reason already alleged, as Isaiah again says: “Thou hast not [brought to] Me the sheep of thy holocaust, nor in thy sacrifices hast thou glorified Me: thou hast not served Me in sacrifices, nor in [the matter of] frankincense hast thou done anything laboriously; neither hast thou bought for Me incense with money, nor have I desired the fat of thy sacrifices; but thou hast stood before Me in thy sins and in thine iniquities.”4020

    4020


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xi Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 36
    Jer. ix. 23, 24.

    Similarly against the daughters of Sion does He inveigh by Isaiah, when they were haughty through their pomp and the abundance of their riches,4016

    4016


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.v Pg 42
    By Jeremiah, chap. ix. 23, 24.

    Unless, forsooth, the Creator enjoined us to glory in the god of Marcion.
    96:10,11 99:1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xv Pg 9.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xv Pg 9.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xiv Pg 3
    Ex. xxiv. 18.

    And he received from the Lord1643

    1643


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.iii Pg 26.1
    146:1


    Anf-01 ix.iv.ix Pg 11
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    But that He did Himself make all things freely, and as He pleased, again David says, “But our God is in the heavens above, and in the earth; He hath made all things whatsoever He pleased.”3372

    3372


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxiii Pg 3
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    And again, “All things were made by Him, and without Him was nothing made.”2931

    2931


    Anf-02 iv.ii.i.vii Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.iv Pg 39.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.v.xlv Pg 5
    Spiritu Ipsius: “by His Spirit.” See Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    He is the Lord’s right hand,6596

    6596


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 14
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    —that is to say, by the Spirit (or Divine Nature) which was in the Word: thus is it evident that it is one and the same power which is in one place described under the name of Wisdom, and in another passage under the appellation of the Word, which was initiated for the works of God7835

    7835


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 9
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    Now this Word, the Power of God and the Wisdom of God, must be the very Son of God.  So that, if (He did) all things by the Son, He must have stretched out the heavens by the Son, and so not have stretched them out alone, except in the sense in which He is “alone” (and apart) from all other gods. Accordingly He says, concerning the Son, immediately afterwards: “Who else is it that frustrateth the tokens of the liars, and maketh diviners mad, turning wise men backward, and making their knowledge foolish, and confirming the words7996

    7996


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 14
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    Inasmuch, then, as the heaven was prepared when Wisdom was present in the Word, and since all things were made by the Word, it is quite correct to say that even the Son stretched out the heaven alone, because He alone ministered to the Father’s work. It must also be He who says, “I am the First, and to all futurity I AM.”8001

    8001


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 11
    Ps. xxxiii. 9, Ps. cxlviii. 5.

    Whom, therefore, shall we believe as to the creation of the world—these heretics who have been mentioned that prate so foolishly and inconsistently on the subject, or the disciples of the Lord, and Moses, who was both a faithful servant of God and a prophet? He at first narrated the formation of the world in these words: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth,”2996

    2996


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.ii Pg 14


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 60


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xx Pg 9
    Ps. xcvi. 5. The LXX. in whose version ed. Tisch. it is Ps. xcv. read δαιμόνια, like Tertullian. Our version has “idols.”

    But this has been laid by me rather as a foundation for ensuing observations.  However, it is a defect of custom to say, “By Hercules, So help me the god of faith;”329

    329 Mehercule. Medius Fidius. I have given the rendering of the latter, which seems preferred by Paley (Ov. Fast. vi. 213, note), who considers it = me dius (i.e., Deus) fidius juvet.  Smith (Lat. Dict. s.v.) agrees with him, and explains it, me deus fidius servet. White and Riddle (s.v.) take the me (which appears to be short) as a “demonstrative” particle or prefix, and explain, “By the God of truth!” “As true as heaven,” “Most certainly.”

    while to the custom is added the ignorance of some, who are ignorant that it is an oath by Hercules. Further, what will an oath be, in the name of gods whom you have forsworn, but a collusion of faith with idolatry? For who does not honour them in whose name he swears?


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    and all other things in succession; but neither gods nor angels [had any share in the work].


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxviii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    then the sun, and the moon, and the stars. For having learned this in Egypt, and having been much taken with what Moses had written in the Genesis of the world, he fabled that Vulcan had made in the shield of Achilles a kind of representation of the creation of the world. For he wrote thus:2568

    2568 Iliad, xviii. 483.

    “There he described the earth, the heaven, the sea, The sun that rests not, and the moon full-orb’d; There also, all the stars which round about, As with a radiant frontlet, bind the skies.”


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 2
    Gen. i. 1.

    for, as they maintain, by naming these four,—God, beginning, heaven, and earth,—he set forth their Tetrad. Indicating also its invisible and hidden nature, he said, “Now the earth was invisible and unformed.”2880

    2880


    Anf-02 iii.ii.v Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 17.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.iii Pg 11
    Gen. i. 1.

    and as long as He continued making, one after the other, those things of which He was to be the Lord, it merely mentions God.  “And God said,” “and God made,” “and God saw;”6160

    6160


    Anf-03 v.v.xix Pg 6
    Gen. i. 1.

    just as it would have said, “At last God made the heaven and the earth,” if God had created these after all the rest.  Now, if the beginning is a substance, the end must also be material. No doubt, a substantial thing6320

    6320 Substantivum aliquid.

    may be the beginning of some other thing which may be formed out of it; thus the clay is the beginning of the vessel, and the seed is the beginning of the plant. But when we employ the word beginning in this sense of origin, and not in that of order, we do not omit to mention also the name of that particular thing which we regard as the origin of the other. On the other hand,6321

    6321 De cetero.

    if we were to make such a statement as this, for example, “In the beginning the potter made a basin or a water-jug,” the word beginning will not here indicate a material substance (for I have not mentioned the clay, which is the beginning in this sense, but only the order of the work, meaning that the potter made the basin and the jug first, before anything else—intending afterwards to make the rest. It is, then, to the order of the works that the word beginning has reference, not to the origin of their substances. I might also explain this word beginning in another way, which would not, however, be inapposite.6322

    6322 Non ab re tamen.

    The Greek term for beginning, which is ἀρχή, admits the sense not only of priority of order, but of power as well; whence princes and magistrates are called ἀρχοντες. Therefore in this sense too, beginning may be taken for princely authority and power. It was, indeed, in His transcendent authority and power, that God made the heaven and the earth.


    Anf-03 v.v.xx Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    —“and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  All things were made by Him, and without Him nothing was made.”6333

    6333


    Anf-03 v.v.xxii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 1.

    I revere6345

    6345 Adoro: reverently admire.

    the fulness of His Scripture, in which He manifests to me both the Creator and the creation. In the gospel, moreover, I discover a Minister and Witness of the Creator, even His Word.6346

    6346


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 3
    Gen. i. 1.

    The Scripture, which at its very outset proposes to run through the order thereof tells us as its first information that it was created; it next proceeds to set forth what sort of earth it was.6367

    6367 Qualitatem ejus: unless this means “how He made it,” like the “qualiter fecerit” below.

    In like manner with respect to the heaven, it informs us first of its creation—“In the beginning God made the heaven:”6368

    6368


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    it then goes on to introduce its arrangement; how that God both separated “the water which was below the firmament from that which was above the firmament,”6369

    6369


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 29
    Cum cælo separavit: Gen. i. 1.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    They will have it, moreover, that he spoke of the second Tetrad, the offspring of the first, in this way—by naming an abyss and darkness, in which were also water, and the Spirit moving upon the water. Then, proceeding to mention the Decad, he names light, day, night, the firmament, the evening, the morning, dry land, sea, plants, and, in the tenth place, trees. Thus, by means of these ten names, he indicated the ten Æons. The power of the Duodecad, again, was shadowed forth by him thus:—He names the sun, moon, stars, seasons, years, whales, fishes, reptiles, birds, quadrupeds, wild beasts, and after all these, in the twelfth place, man. Thus they teach that the Triacontad was spoken of through Moses by the Spirit. Moreover, man also, being formed after the image of the power above, had in himself that ability which flows from the one source. This ability was seated in the region of the brain, from which four faculties proceed, after the image of the Tetrad above, and these are called: the first, sight, the second, hearing, the third, smell, and the fourth,2881

    2881 One of the senses was thus capriciously cancelled by these heretics.

    taste. And they say that the Ogdoad is indicated by man in this way: that he possesses two ears, the like number of eyes, also two nostrils, and a twofold taste, namely, of bitter and sweet. Moreover, they teach that the whole man contains the entire image of the Triacontad as follows: In his hands, by means of his fingers, he bears the Decad; and in his whole body the Duodecad, inasmuch as his body is divided into twelve members; for they portion that out, as the body of Truth is divided by them—a point of which we have already spoken.2882

    2882 See above, chap. xiv. 2.

    But the Ogdoad, as being unspeakable and invisible, is understood as hidden in the viscera.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvi Pg 11
    Gen. i. 2.

    Whose kingdom shall I wish to come—his, of whom I never heard as the king of glory; or His, in whose hand are even the hearts of kings? Who shall give me my daily4537

    4537


    Anf-03 v.v.xxiii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    For he resolves6350

    6350 Redigit in.

    the word earth into Matter, because that which is made out of it is the earth.  And to the word was he gives the same direction, as if it pointed to what had always existed unbegotten and unmade. It was without form, moreover, and void, because he will have Matter to have existed shapeless and confused, and without the finish of a maker’s hand.6351

    6351 Inconditam: we have combined the two senses of the word.

    Now these opinions of his I will refute singly; but first I wish to say to him, by way of general answer: We are of opinion that Matter is pointed at in these terms. But yet does the Scripture intimate that, because Matter was in existence before all, anything of like condition6352

    6352 Tale aliquid.

    was even formed out of it? Nothing of the kind. Matter might have had existence, if it so pleased—or rather if Hermogenes so pleased. It might, I say, have existed, and yet God might not have made anything out of it, either as it was unsuitable to Him to have required the aid of anything, or at least because He is not shown to have made anything out of Matter. Its existence must therefore be without a cause, you will say. Oh, no! certainly6353

    6353 Plane: ironical.

    not without cause. For even if the world were not made out of it, yet a heresy has been hatched there from; and a specially impudent one too, because it is not Matter which has produced the heresy, but the heresy has rather made Matter itself.


    Anf-03 v.v.xxv Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    Of course, if I were to ask, to which of the two earths the name earth is best suited,6361

    6361 Quæ cui nomen terræ accommodare debeat. This is literally a double question, asking about the fitness of the name, and to which earth it is best adapted.

    I shall be told that the earth which was made derived the appellation from that of which it was made, on the ground that it is more likely that the offspring should get its name from the original, than the original from the offspring. This being the case, another question presents itself to us, whether it is right and proper that this earth which God made should have derived its name from that out of which He made it? For I find from Hermogenes and the rest of the Materialist heretics,6362

    6362 He means those who have gone wrong on the eternity of matter.

    that while the one earth was indeed “without form, and void,” this one of ours obtained from God in an equal degree6363

    6363 Proinde.

    both form, and beauty, and symmetry; and therefore that the earth which was created was a different thing from that out of which it was created. Now, having become a different thing, it could not possibly have shared with the other in its name, after it had declined from its condition. If earth was the proper name of the (original) Matter, this world of ours, which is not Matter, because it has become another thing, is unfit to bear the name of earth, seeing that that name belongs to something else, and is a stranger to its nature. But (you will tell me) Matter which has undergone creation, that is, our earth, had with its original a community of name no less than of kind. By no means. For although the pitcher is formed out of the clay, I shall no longer call it clay, but a pitcher; so likewise, although electrum6364

    6364 A mixed metal, of the colour of amber.

    is compounded of gold and silver, I shall yet not call it either gold or silver, but electrum. When there is a departure from the nature of any thing, there is likewise a relinquishment of its name—with a propriety which is alike demanded by the designation and the condition. How great a change indeed from the condition of that earth, which is Matter, has come over this earth of ours, is plain even from the fact that the latter has received this testimony to its goodness in Genesis, “And God saw that it was good;”6365

    6365


    Anf-03 v.v.xxx Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    as if these blended6427

    6427 Confusæ.

    substances, presented us with arguments for his massive pile of Matter.6428

    6428 Massalis illius molis.

    Now, so discriminating an enumeration of certain and distinct elements (as we have in this passage), which severally designates “darkness,” “the deep,” “the Spirit of God,” “the waters,” forbids the inference that anything confused or (from such confusion) uncertain is meant. Still more, when He ascribed to them their own places,6429

    6429 Situs.

    darkness on the face of the deep,” “the Spirit upon the face of the waters,” He repudiated all confusion in the substances; and by demonstrating their separate position,6430

    6430 Dispositionem.

    He demonstrated also their distinction.  Most absurd, indeed, would it be that Matter, which is introduced to our view as “without form,” should have its “formless” condition maintained by so many words indicative of form,6431

    6431 Tot formarum vocabulis.

    without any intimation of what that confused body6432

    6432 Corpus confusionis.

    is, which must of course be supposed to be unique,6433

    6433 Unicum.

    since it is without form.6434

    6434 Informe.

    For that which is without form is uniform; but even6435

    6435 Autem.

    that which is without form, when it is blended together6436

    6436 Confusum.

    from various component parts,6437

    6437 Ex varietate.

    must necessarily have one outward appearance;6438

    6438 Unam speciem.

    and it has not any appearance, until it has the one appearance (which comes) from many parts combined.6439

    6439 Unam ex multis speciem.

    Now Matter either had those specific parts6440

    6440 Istas species.

    within itself, from the words indicative of which it had to be understood—I mean “darkness,” and “the deep,” and “the Spirit,” and “the waters”—or it had them not. If it had them, how is it introduced as being “without form?”6441

    6441 Non habens formas.

    If it had them not, how does it become known?6442

    6442 Agnoscitur.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 8
    De spiritu. This shows that Tertullian took the spirit of Gen. i. 2 in the inferior sense.

    also Amos says, “He that strengtheneth the thunder6462

    6462 So also the Septuagint.

    , and createth the wind, and declareth His Christ6463

    6463 So also the Septuagint.

    unto men;”6464

    6464


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 19
    Gen. i. 2.

    refers to Matter, as indeed do all those other Scriptures here and there,6473

    6473 In disperso.

    which demonstrate that the separate parts were made out of Matter. It must follow, then,6474

    6474 Ergo: Tertullian’s answer.

    that as earth consisted of earth, so also depth consisted of depth, and darkness of darkness, and the wind and waters of wind and waters. And, as we said above,6475

    6475 Ch. xxx., towards the end.

    Matter could not have been without form, since it had specific parts, which were formed out of it—although as separate things6476

    6476 Ut et aliæ.

    —unless, indeed, they were not separate, but were the very same with those out of which they came. For it is really impossible that those specific things, which are set forth under the same names, should have been diverse; because in that case6477

    6477 Jam.

    the operation of God might seem to be useless,6478

    6478 Otiosa.

    if it made things which existed already; since that alone would be a creation,6479

    6479 Generatio: creation in the highest sense of matter issuing from the maker. Another reading has “generosiora essent,” for our “generatio sola esset,” meaning that, “those things would be nobler which had not been made,” which is obviously quite opposed to Tertullian’s argument.

    when things came into being, which had not been (previously) made. Therefore, to conclude, either Moses then pointed to Matter when he wrote the words: “And darkness was on the face of the deep, and the spirit of God moved on the face of the waters;” or else, inasmuch as these specific parts of creation are afterwards shown in other passages to have been made by God, they ought to have been with equal explicitness6480

    6480 Æque.

    shown to have been made out of the Matter which, according to you, Moses had previously mentioned;6481

    6481 Præmiserat.

    or else, finally, if Moses pointed to those specific parts, and not to Matter, I want to know where Matter has been pointed out at all.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.ix.xii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 6, 7.

    and God also said, “Let there be lights (in the firmament); and so God made a greater and a lesser light.”7901

    7901


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 10
    Gen. i. 6, 7, 8.

    the suspension of “the dry land” He accomplished by “separating the waters.” After the world had been hereupon set in order through its elements, when inhabitants were given it, “the waters” were the first to receive the precept “to bring forth living creatures.”8559

    8559 Animas.

    Water was the first to produce that which had life, that it might be no wonder in baptism if waters know how to give life.8560

    8560 Animare.

    For was not the work of fashioning man himself also achieved with the aid of waters?  Suitable material is found in the earth, yet not apt for the purpose unless it be moist and juicy; which (earth) “the waters,” separated the fourth day before into their own place, temper with their remaining moisture to a clayey consistency. If, from that time onward, I go forward in recounting universally, or at more length, the evidences of the “authority” of this element which I can adduce to show how great is its power or its grace; how many ingenious devices, how many functions, how useful an instrumentality, it affords the world, I fear I may seem to have collected rather the praises of water than the reasons of baptism; although I should thereby teach all the more fully, that it is not to be doubted that God has made the material substance which He has disposed throughout all His products8561

    8561 Rebus.

    and works, obey Him also in His own peculiar sacraments; that the material substance which governs terrestrial life acts as agent likewise in the celestial.


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 20
    Jer. x. 11.

    For, from the fact of his having subjoined their destruction, he shows them to be no gods at all. Elias, too, when all Israel was assembled at Mount Carmel, wishing to turn them from idolatry, says to them, “How long halt ye between two opinions?3346

    3346 Literally, “In both houghs,” in ambabus suffraginibus.

    If the Lord be God,3347

    3347 The old Latin translation has, “Si unus est Dominus Deus”—If the Lord God is one; which is supposed by the critics to have occurred through carelessness of the translator.

    follow Him.”3348

    3348


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 8.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiv Pg 35
    Amos ix. 6.

    certainly not for Himself alone, but for His people also, who will be with Him. “And Thou shalt bind them about Thee,” says he, “like the adornment of a bride.”3468

    3468


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 48
    Ascensum in cœlum: Sept. ἀνάβασιν εἰς τὸν οὐρανόν, Amos ix. 6. See on this passage the article Heaven in Kitto’s Cyclopædia (3d edit.), vol. ii. p. 245, where the present writer has discussed the probable meaning of the verse.

    which Christ “builds”—of course for His people.  There also is that everlasting abode of which Isaiah asks, “Who shall declare unto you the eternal place, but He (that is, of course, Christ) who walketh in righteousness, speaketh of the straight path, hateth injustice and iniquity?”4849

    4849


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 55
    See Isa. lii. 7, xxxiii. 14 (Sept.), and Amos ix. 6.

    Down in hell, however, it was said concerning them: “They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them!”—even those who did not believe them or at least did not sincerely4856

    4856 Omnino.

    believe that after death there were punishments for the arrogance of wealth and the glory of luxury, announced indeed by Moses and the prophets, but decreed by that God, who deposes princes from their thrones, and raiseth up the poor from dunghills.4857

    4857


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxvii Pg 4
    Ps. xcix.



    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxvii Pg 4
    Ps. xcix.



    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxvii Pg 4
    Ps. xcix.



    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxiv Pg 6
    Isa. vi. 3.

    And let us therefore, conscientiously gathering together in harmony, cry to Him earnestly, as with one mouth, that we may be made partakers of His great and glorious promises. For [the Scripture] saith, “Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which He hath prepared for them that wait for Him.”144

    144


    Anf-03 vi.iv.iii Pg 9
    Isa. vi. 3; Rev. iv. 8.

    In like wise, therefore, we too, candidates for angelhood, if we succeed in deserving it, begin even here on earth to learn by heart that strain hereafter to be raised unto God, and the function of future glory. So far, for the glory of God. On the other hand, for our own petition, when we say, “Hallowed be Thy name,” we pray this; that it may be hallowed in us who are in Him, as well in all others for whom the grace of God is still waiting;8780

    8780


    Anf-01 v.xvi.i Pg 8
    Eccl. ii. 25 (after LXX.); Zech. ix. 17.

    Give attention to reading,1273

    1273 92:10 112:9


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xix Pg 29
    Ps. ix. 12.

    and they shall attain to glory, then all shall be confounded by Christ, who have cast a slur upon their martyrdom. And from this fact, that He exclaimed upon the cross, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do,”3656

    3656


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.viii Pg 48.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.xiv Pg 6
    Compare Ps. ii. 4.

    how was the evil one cut asunder,9173

    9173 i.e. with rage and disappointment.

    while Job with mighty equanimity kept scraping off9174

    9174


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vi Pg 34.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.iii Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 44
    Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11" id="v.iv.vi.vi-p44.1" parsed="|1Cor|3|19|3|20;|Job|5|13|0|0;|Ps|94|11|0|0" osisRef="Bible:1Cor.3.19-1Cor.3.20 Bible:Job.5.13 Bible:Ps.94.11">1 Cor. iii. 19, 20; Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11.

    For in general we may conclude for certain that he could not possibly have cited the authority of that God whom he was bound to destroy, since he would not teach for Him.5467

    5467 Si non illi doceret.

    “Therefore,” says he, “let no man glory in man;”5468

    5468


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 8
    1 Kings x. 1.

    she whom the Lord also referred to as one who should rise up in the judgment with the nations of those men who do hear His words, and do not believe in Him, and should condemn them, inasmuch as she submitted herself to the wisdom announced by the servant of God, while these men despised that wisdom which proceeded directly from the Son of God. For Solomon was a servant, but Christ is indeed the Son of God, and the Lord of Solomon. While, therefore, he served God without blame, and ministered to His dispensations, then was he glorified: but when he took wives from all nations, and permitted them to set up idols in Israel, the Scripture spake thus concerning him: “And King Solomon was a lover of women, and he took to himself foreign women; and it came to pass, when Solomon was old, his heart was not perfect with the Lord his God. And the foreign women turned away his heart after strange gods. And Solomon did evil in the sight of the Lord: he did not walk after the Lord, as did David his father. And the Lord was angry with Solomon; for his heart was not perfect with the Lord, as was the heart of David his father.”4181

    4181


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 9
    1 Kings xi. 1.

    The Scripture has thus sufficiently reproved him, as the presbyter remarked, in order that no flesh may glory in the sight of the Lord.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 9
    I am not acquainted with any such passage. Oehler refers to Isa. xlix. in his margin, but gives no verse, and omits to notice this passage of the present treatise in his index.

    Thus, therefore, before this temporal sabbath, there was withal an eternal sabbath foreshown and foretold; just as before the carnal circumcision there was withal a spiritual circumcision foreshown. In short, let them teach us, as we have already premised, that Adam observed the sabbath; or that Abel, when offering to God a holy victim, pleased Him by a religious reverence for the sabbath; or that Enoch, when translated, had been a keeper of the sabbath; or that Noah the ark-builder observed, on account of the deluge, an immense sabbath; or that Abraham, in observance of the sabbath, offered Isaac his son; or that Melchizedek in his priesthood received the law of the sabbath.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 14.1


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxxiii Pg 28
    See Bull’s Works, Vol. V., p. 381.

    I value it chiefly because it proves that the Greek Testament, elsewhere says, disjointedly, what is collected into 1 John v. 7. It is, therefore, Holy Scripture in substance, if not in the letter. What seems to me important, however, is the balance it gives to the whole context, and the defective character of the grammar and logic, if it be stricken out. In the Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate of the Old Testament we have a precisely similar case. Refer to Psa. xiii., alike in the Latin and the Greek, as compared with our English Version.8214

    8214


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxvi Pg 5
    Ps. i. 3.

    Again, the righteous is said to flourish like the palm-tree. God appeared from a tree to Abraham, as it is written, near the oak in Mamre. The people found seventy willows and twelve springs after crossing the Jordan.2290

    2290


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 11
    Ps. i. 3–6.

    Mark how He has described at once both the water and the cross. For these words imply, Blessed are they who, placing their trust in the cross, have gone down into the water; for, says He, they shall receive their reward in due time: then He declares, I will recompense them. But now He saith,1601

    1601 Cod. Sin. has, “what meaneth?”

    “Their leaves shall not fade.” This meaneth, that every word which proceedeth out of your mouth in faith and love shall tend to bring conversion and hope to many. Again, another prophet saith, “And the land of Jacob shall be extolled above every land.”1602

    1602


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 19.1


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 17
    Ps. i. 3.

    “He that hath clean hands and a pure heart, who hath not taken God’s name in vain, nor sworn deceitfully to his neighbour, he shall receive blessing from the Lord, and mercy from the God of his salvation.”2937

    2937


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 125.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 4
    Cod. Sin. has, “have dug a pit of death.” See Jer. ii. 12, 13.

    Is my holy hill Zion a desolate rock? For ye shall be as the fledglings of a bird, which fly away when the nest is removed.”1594


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxiv Pg 7
    Jer. ii. 13.



    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxl Pg 2
    Jer. ii. 13.

    But they are cisterns broken, and holding no water, which your own teachers have digged, as the Scripture also expressly asserts, ‘teaching for doctrines the commandments of men.’2483

    2483


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxv Pg 6
    Jer. ii. 13.

    out of earthly trenches, and drink putrid water out of the mire, fleeing from the faith of the Church lest they be convicted; and rejecting the Spirit, that they may not be instructed.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 23.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 32
    ὑδατος ζωῆς in the LXX. here (ed. Tischendorf, who quotes the Cod. Alex. as reading, however, ὑδατος ζῶντος). Comp. Rev. xxii. 1, 17, and xxi. 6; John vii. 37–39. (The reference, it will be seen, is still to Jer. ii. 10–13; but the writer has mixed up words of Amos therewith.)

    and they have digged for themselves worn-out tanks, which will not be able to contain water.” Undoubtedly, by not receiving Christ, the “fount of water of life,” they have begun to have “worn-out tanks,” that is, synagogues for the use of the “dispersions of the Gentiles,”1411

    1411


    Anf-01 ix.vi.vi Pg 10
    Ps. xlv. 16.

    Christ Himself, therefore, together with the Father, is the God of the living, who spake to Moses, and who was also manifested to the fathers.

    *margins


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xi Pg 20
    Isa. xii. 2.

    But as bringing salvation, thus: “God hath made known His salvation (salutare) in the sight of the heathen.”3412

    3412


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xiv Pg 3
    Ps. xxxvii. 35–37. “Remnant” probably refers either to the memory or posterity of the righteous.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.v Pg 25.1


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 19


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 60.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 20
    Ps. xxxiv. 19.

    “Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of His saints.”2940

    2940 100:5 118:1 136:1-26


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 41
    Isa. x. 33.

    And who are these but the rich? Because they have indeed received their consolation, glory, and honour and a lofty position from their wealth. In Psalm xlviii. He also turns off our care from these and says: “Be not thou afraid when one is made rich, and when his glory is increased: for when he shall die, he shall carry nothing away; nor shall his glory descend along with him.”4021

    4021


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.iii Pg 26.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xvi Pg 2
    Deut. v. 22.

    For this reason [He did so], that they who are willing to follow Him might keep these commandments. But when they turned themselves to make a calf, and had gone back in their minds to Egypt, desiring to be slaves instead of free-men, they were placed for the future in a state of servitude suited to their wish,—[a slavery] which did not indeed cut them off from God, but subjected them to the yoke of bondage; as Ezekiel the prophet, when stating the reasons for the giving of such a law, declares: “And their eyes were after the desire of their heart; and I gave them statutes that were not good, and judgments in which they shall not live.”3970

    3970


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xvii Pg 20
    Deut. v. 22.

    for, as I have already observed, He stood in need of nothing from them. And again Moses says: “And now Israel, what doth the Lord thy God require of thee, but to fear the Lord thy God, to walk in all His ways, and to love Him, and to serve the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul?”3999

    3999


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 25
    Deut. v. 24.

    For certain of these men used to see the prophetic Spirit and His active influences poured forth for all kinds of gifts; others, again, [beheld] the advent of the Lord, and that dispensation which obtained from the beginning, by which He accomplished the will of the Father with regard to things both celestial and terrestrial; and others [beheld] paternal glories adapted to the times, and to those who saw and who heard them then, and to all who were subsequently to hear them. Thus, therefore, was God revealed; for God the Father is shown forth through all these [operations], the Spirit indeed working, and the Son ministering, while the Father was approving, and man’s salvation being accomplished. As He also declares through Hosea the prophet: “I,” He says, “have multiplied visions, and have used similitudes by the ministry (in manibus) of the prophets.”4082

    4082


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 40
    1 Kings xix. 11, 12.

    For by such means was the prophet—very indignant, because of the transgression of the people and the slaughter of the prophets—both taught to act in a more gentle manner; and the Lord’s advent as a man was pointed out, that it should be subsequent to that law which was given by Moses, mild and tranquil, in which He would neither break the bruised reed, nor quench the smoking flax.4093

    4093


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxxi Pg 3
    1 Kings xix. 11, 12.

    But these things pious men must understand in a higher sense with profound and meditative insight. But Plato, not attending to the words with the suitable insight, said that God exists in a fiery substance.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 59
    See Ex. xii. 1–11.

    that is, the passion of Christ. Which prediction was thus also fulfilled, that “on the first day of unleavened bread1362

    1362


    Anf-01 ii.ii.lii Pg 5
    Ps. li. 17.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 5
    Ps. li. 17.

    Because, therefore, God stands in need of nothing, He declares in the preceding Psalm: “I will take no calves out of thine house, nor he-goats out of thy fold. For Mine are all the beasts of the earth, the herds and the oxen on the mountains: I know all the fowls of heaven, and the various tribes4011

    4011 Or, “the beauty,” species.

    of the field are Mine. If I were hungry, I would not tell thee: for the world is Mine, and the fulness thereof. Shall I eat the flesh of bulls, or drink the blood of goats?”4012

    4012


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xviii Pg 7
    Ps. li. 1–17.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vii.iii Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 10
    See Ps. li. 17 (in LXX. l. 19).

    and elsewhere, “Sacrifice to God a sacrifice of praise, and render to the Highest thy vows.”1205

    1205


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xxv Pg 9
    Dan. vi. 10; comp. Ps. lv. 17 (in the LXX. it is liv. 18).

    in accordance (of course) with Israel’s discipline—we pray at least not less than thrice in the day, debtors as we are to ThreeFather, Son, and Holy Spirit: of course, in addition to our regular prayers which are due, without any admonition, on the entrance of light and of night. But, withal, it becomes believers not to take food, and not to go to the bath, before interposing a prayer; for the refreshments and nourishments of the spirit are to be held prior to those of the flesh, and things heavenly prior to things earthly.


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvii Pg 36
    See Isa. v. 5, 23, and x. 2.

    Of these Isaiah also says, “Woe unto them that are strong in Jerusalem!”4609

    4609


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xvii Pg 3
    Gen. xviii. 27.

    Moreover, it is thus written of Job, “Job was a righteous man, and blameless, truthful, God-fearing, and one that kept himself from all evil.”74

    74


    Anf-01 v.iii.xii Pg 12
    Gen. xviii. 27; Job xxx. 19.

    before God. And David says, “Who am I before Thee, O Lord, that Thou hast glorified me hitherto?”721

    721


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvi Pg 6.1


    Anf-03 v.vii.iii Pg 15
    Gen. xxxii.

    Has it, then, been permitted to angels, which are inferior to God, after they have been changed into human bodily form,6983

    6983 See below in chap. vi. and in the Anti-Marcion, iii. 9.

    nevertheless to remain angels? and will you deprive God, their superior, of this faculty, as if Christ could not continue to be God, after His real assumption of the nature of man? Or else, did those angels appear as phantoms of flesh? You will not, however, have the courage to say this; for if it be so held in your belief, that the Creator’s angels are in the same condition as Christ, then Christ will belong to the same God as those angels do, who are like Christ in their condition. If you had not purposely rejected in some instances, and corrupted in others, the Scriptures which are opposed to your opinion, you would have been confuted in this matter by the Gospel of John, when it declares that the Spirit descended in the body6984

    6984 Corpore.

    of a dove, and sat upon the Lord.6985

    6985


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 126.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.xv Pg 6
    i.e., as Rigaltius (referred to by Oehler), explains, after the two visions of angels who appeared to him and said, “Arise and eat.” See 1 Kings xix. 4–13. [It was the fourth, but our author having mentioned two, inadvertently calls it the third, referring to the “still small voice,” in which Elijah saw His manifestation.]

    For where God is, there too is His foster-child, namely Patience. When God’s Spirit descends, then Patience accompanies Him indivisibly. If we do not give admission to her together with the Spirit, will (He) always tarry with us? Nay, I know not whether He would remain any longer. Without His companion and handmaid, He must of necessity be straitened in every place and at every time. Whatever blow His enemy may inflict He will be unable to endure alone, being without the instrumental means of enduring.
    *marg:


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 21.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.iii.xii Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.i Pg 24.1


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxxiii Pg 5
    Isa. v. 18–25.

    For verily your hand is high to commit evil, because ye slew the Christ, and do not repent of it; but so far from that, ye hate and murder us who have believed through Him in the God and Father of all, as often as ye can; and ye curse Him without ceasing, as well as those who side with Him; while all of us pray for you, and for all men, as our Christ and Lord taught us to do, when He enjoined us to pray even for our enemies, and to love them that hate us, and to bless them that curse us.


    Anf-03 iv.iv.iv Pg 5
    “Sanguinis perditionis:” such is the reading of Oehler and others. If it be correct, probably the phrase “perdition of blood” must be taken as equivalent to “bloody perdition,” after the Hebrew fashion. Compare, for similar instances, Bible:Ezek.22.2">2 Sam. xvi. 7; Ps. v. 6; xxvi. 9; lv. 23; Ezek. xxii. 2, with the marginal readings. But Fr. Junius would read, “Of blood and of perdition”—sanguinis et perditionis. Oehler’s own interpretation of the reading he gives—“blood-shedding”—appears unsatisfactory.

    repentance is being prepared. Ye who serve stones, and ye who make images of gold, and silver, and wood, and stones and clay, and serve phantoms, and demons, and spirits in fanes,182

    182 “In fanis.” This is Oehler’s reading on conjecture. Other readings are—infamis, infamibus, insanis, infernis.

    and all errors not according to knowledge, shall find no help from them.” But Isaiah183

    183 102:12,24-27


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 5
    Ps. lxxxii. 1.

    He [here] refers to the Father and the Son, and those who have received the adoption; but these are the Church. For she is the synagogue of God, which God—that is, the Son Himself—has gathered by Himself. Of whom He again speaks: “The God of gods, the Lord hath spoken, and hath called the earth.”3333

    3333


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxiv Pg 2
    Ps. lxxxii.

    But in the version of the Seventy it is written, ‘Behold, ye die like men, and fall like one of the princes,’2434

    2434 In the text there is certainly no distinction given. But if we read ὡς ἄνθρωπος (כְּאָדָם), “as a man,” in the first quotation we shall be able to follow Justin’s argument.

    in order to manifest the disobedience of men,—I mean of Adam and Eve,—and the fall of one of the princes, i.e., of him who was called the serpent, who fell with a great overthrow, because he deceived Eve. But as my discourse is not intended to touch on this point, but to prove to you that the Holy Ghost reproaches men because they were made like God, free from suffering and death, provided that they kept His commandments, and were deemed deserving of the name of His sons, and yet they, becoming like Adam and Eve, work out death for themselves; let the interpretation of the Psalm be held just as you wish, yet thereby it is demonstrated that all men are deemed worthy of becoming “gods,” and of having power to become sons of the Highest; and shall be each by himself judged and condemned like Adam and Eve. Now I have proved at length that Christ is called God.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xx Pg 42.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.vii Pg 5
    Ps. lxxxii. 1; 6.

    As therefore the attribute of supremacy would be inappropriate to these, although they are called gods, so is it to the Creator. This is a foolish objection; and my answer to it is, that its author fails to consider that quite as strong an objection might be urged against the (superior) god of Marcion: he too is called god, but is not on that account proved to be divine, as neither are angels nor men, the Creator’s handiwork. If an identity of names affords a presumption in support of equality of condition, how often do worthless menials strut insolently in the names of kings—your Alexanders, Cæsars, and Pompeys!2403

    2403 The now less obvious nicknames of “Alex. Darius and Olofernes,” are in the text.

    This fact, however, does not detract from the real attributes of the royal persons.  Nay more, the very idols of the Gentiles are called gods. Yet not one of them is divine because he is called a god. It is not, therefore, for the name of god, for its sound or its written form, that I am claiming the supremacy in the Creator, but for the essence2404

    2404 Substantiæ.

    to which the name belongs; and when I find that essence alone is unbegotten and unmade—alone eternal, and the maker of all things—it is not to its name, but its state, not to its designation, but its condition, that I ascribe and appropriate the attribute of the supremacy.  And so, because the essence to which I ascribe it has come2405

    2405 Vocari obtinuit.

    to be called god, you suppose that I ascribe it to the name, because I must needs use a name to express the essence, of which indeed that Being consists who is called God, and who is accounted the great Supreme because of His essence, not from His name. In short, Marcion himself, when he imputes this character to his god, imputes it to the nature,2406

    2406 Statum.

    not to the word. That supremacy, then, which we ascribe to God in consideration of His essence, and not because of His name, ought, as we maintain, to be equal2407

    2407 Ex pari.

    in both the beings who consist of that substance for which the name of God is given; because, in as far as they are called gods (i.e. supreme beings, on the strength, of course, of their unbegotten and eternal, and therefore great and supreme essence), in so far the attribute of being the great Supreme cannot be regarded as less or worse in one than in another great Supreme. If the happiness, and sublimity, and perfection2408

    2408 Integritas.

    of the Supreme Being shall hold good of Marcion’s god, it will equally so of ours; and if not of ours, it will equally not hold of Marcion’s. Therefore two supreme beings will be neither equal nor unequal: not equal, because the principle which we have just expounded, that the Supreme Being admits of no comparison with Himself, forbids it; not unequal, because another principle meets us respecting the Supreme Being, that He is capable of no diminution. So, Marcion, you are caught2409

    2409 Hæsisti.

    in the midst of your own Pontic tide.  The waves of truth overwhelm you on every side. You can neither set up equal gods nor unequal ones. For there are not two; so far as the question of number is properly concerned. Although the whole matter of the two gods is at issue, we have yet confined our discussion to certain bounds, within which we shall now have to contend about separate peculiarities.


    Anf-03 v.v.v Pg 9
    Comp. 1 Cor. xv. 32, where the word is also used figuratively.

    both by land and sea, both by night and day, being bound to ten leopards, I mean a band of soldiers, who, even when they receive benefits,857

    857 Probably the soldiers received gifts from the Christians, to treat Ignatius with kindness.

    show themselves all the worse. But I am the more instructed by their injuries [to act as a disciple of Christ]; “yet am I not thereby justified.”858

    858


    Anf-03 v.ix.xiii Pg 10
    Ver. 1.

    in order that, if the Scripture has not been afraid to designate as gods human beings, who have become sons of God by faith, you may be sure that the same Scripture has with greater propriety conferred the name of the Lord on the true and one only Son of God. Very well! you say, I shall challenge you to preach from this day forth (and that, too, on the authority of these same Scriptures) two Gods and two Lords, consistently with your views. God forbid, (is my reply). For we, who by the grace of God possess an insight into both the times and the occasions of the Sacred Writings, especially we who are followers of the Paraclete, not of human teachers, do indeed definitively declare that Two Beings are God, the Father and the Son, and, with the addition of the Holy Spirit, even Three, according to the principle of the divine economy, which introduces number, in order that the Father may not, as you perversely infer, be Himself believed to have been born and to have suffered, which it is not lawful to believe, forasmuch as it has not been so handed down. That there are, however, two Gods or two Lords, is a statement which at no time proceeds out of our mouth: not as if it were untrue that the Father is God, and the Son is God, and the Holy Ghost is God, and each is God; but because in earlier times Two were actually spoken of as God, and two as Lord, that when Christ should come He might be both acknowledged as God and designated as Lord, being the Son of Him who is both God and Lord. Now, if there were found in the Scriptures but one Personality of Him who is God and Lord, Christ would justly enough be inadmissible to the title of God and Lord: for (in the Scriptures) there was declared to be none other than One God and One Lord, and it must have followed that the Father should Himself seem to have come down (to earth), inasmuch as only One God and One Lord was ever read of (in the Scriptures), and His entire Economy would be involved in obscurity, which has been planned and arranged with so clear a foresight in His providential dispensation as matter for our faith.  As soon, however, as Christ came, and was recognised by us as the very Being who had from the beginning7914

    7914 Retro.

    caused plurality7915

    7915 Numerum.

    (in the Divine Economy), being the second from the Father, and with the Spirit the third, and Himself declaring and manifesting the Father more fully (than He had ever been before), the title of Him who is God and Lord was at once restored to the Unity (of the Divine Nature), even because the Gentiles would have to pass from the multitude of their idols to the One Only God, in order that a difference might be distinctly settled between the worshippers of One God and the votaries of polytheism. For it was only right that Christians should shine in the world as “children of light,” adoring and invoking Him who is the One God and Lord as “the light of the world.” Besides, if, from that perfect knowledge7916

    7916 Conscientia.

    which assures us that the title of God and Lord is suitable both to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost, we were to invoke a plurality of gods and lords, we should quench our torches, and we should become less courageous to endure the martyr’s sufferings, from which an easy escape would everywhere lie open to us, as soon as we swore by a plurality of gods and lords, as sundry heretics do, who hold more gods than One.  I will therefore not speak of gods at all, nor of lords, but I shall follow the apostle; so that if the Father and the Son, are alike to be invoked, I shall call the FatherGod,” and invoke Jesus Christ as “Lord.”7917

    7917


    Anf-01 vi.ii.x Pg 11
    Ps. i. 1.

    even as the fishes [referred to] go in darkness to the depths [of the sea]; “and hath not stood in the way of sinners,” even as those who profess to fear the Lord, but go astray like swine; “and hath not sat in the seat of scorners,”1585

    1585 Literally, “of the pestilent.”

    even as those birds that lie in wait for prey. Take a full and firm grasp of this spiritual1586


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xi Pg 95.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xv Pg 19.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 21.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 iv.v.iii Pg 4
    Ps. i. 1. [Kaye’s censure of this use of the text, (p. 366) seems to me gratuitous.]

    Though he seems to have predicted beforehand of that just man, that he took no part in the meetings and deliberations of the Jews, taking counsel about the slaying of our Lord, yet divine Scripture has ever far-reaching applications: after the immediate sense has been exhausted, in all directions it fortifies the practice of the religious life, so that here also you have an utterance which is not far from a plain interdicting of the shows. If he called those few Jews an assembly of the wicked, how much more will he so designate so vast a gathering of heathens! Are the heathens less impious, less sinners, less enemies of Christ, than the Jews were then? And see, too, how other things agree. For at the shows they also stand in the way. For they call the spaces between the seats going round the amphitheatre, and the passages which separate the people running down, ways. The place in the curve where the matrons sit is called a chair. Therefore, on the contrary, it holds, unblessed is he who has entered any council of wicked men, and has stood in any way of sinners, and has sat in any chair of scorners. We may understand a thing as spoken generally, even when it requires a certain special interpretation to be given to it. For some things spoken with a special reference contain in them general truth. When God admonishes the Israelites of their duty, or sharply reproves them, He has surely a reference to all men; when He threatens destruction to Egypt and Ethiopia, He surely pre-condemns every sinning nation, whatever. If, reasoning from species to genus, every nation that sins against them is an Egypt and Ethiopia; so also, reasoning from genus to species, with reference to the origin of shows, every show is an assembly of the wicked.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1.

    Where then?  “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity;”2934

    2934


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 46
    Ps. i. 1.



    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxvi Pg 5
    Ps. i. 3.

    Again, the righteous is said to flourish like the palm-tree. God appeared from a tree to Abraham, as it is written, near the oak in Mamre. The people found seventy willows and twelve springs after crossing the Jordan.2290

    2290


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 11
    Ps. i. 3–6.

    Mark how He has described at once both the water and the cross. For these words imply, Blessed are they who, placing their trust in the cross, have gone down into the water; for, says He, they shall receive their reward in due time: then He declares, I will recompense them. But now He saith,1601

    1601 Cod. Sin. has, “what meaneth?”

    “Their leaves shall not fade.” This meaneth, that every word which proceedeth out of your mouth in faith and love shall tend to bring conversion and hope to many. Again, another prophet saith, “And the land of Jacob shall be extolled above every land.”1602

    1602


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 19.1


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 17
    Ps. i. 3.

    “He that hath clean hands and a pure heart, who hath not taken God’s name in vain, nor sworn deceitfully to his neighbour, he shall receive blessing from the Lord, and mercy from the God of his salvation.”2937

    2937


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-01 ii.ii.l Pg 5
    Ps. xxxii. 1, 2.

    This blessedness cometh upon those who have been chosen by God through Jesus Christ our Lord; to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xviii Pg 12
    Ps. xxxii. 1, 2.

    pointing out thus that remission of sins which follows upon His advent, by which “He has destroyed the handwriting” of our debt, and “fastened it to the cross;”4599

    4599


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 247.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xv Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.x.vi Pg 5
    Ps. xxxii. 1; Rom. iv. 7, etc.

    For, strictly speaking, there cannot any longer be reckoned ought against the martyrs, by whom in the baptism (of blood) life itself is laid down. Thus, “love covers the multitude of sins;”8255

    8255


    Anf-01 ii.ii.l Pg 5
    Ps. xxxii. 1, 2.

    This blessedness cometh upon those who have been chosen by God through Jesus Christ our Lord; to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xviii Pg 12
    Ps. xxxii. 1, 2.

    pointing out thus that remission of sins which follows upon His advent, by which “He has destroyed the handwriting” of our debt, and “fastened it to the cross;”4599

    4599


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxli Pg 2
    Ps. xxxii. 2.

    that is, having repented of his sins, that he may receive remission of them from God; and not as you deceive yourselves, and some others who resemble you in this, who say, that even though they be sinners, but know God, the Lord will not impute sin to them. We have as proof of this the one fall of David, which happened through his boasting, which was forgiven then when he so mourned and wept, as it is written. But if even to such a man no remission was granted before repentance, and only when this great king, and anointed one, and prophet, mourned and conducted himself so, how can the impure and utterly abandoned, if they weep not, and mourn not, and repent not, entertain the hope that the Lord will not impute to them sin? And this one fall of David, in the matter of Uriah’s wife, proves, sirs,” I said, “that the patriarchs had many wives, not to commit fornication, but that a certain dispensation and all mysteries might be accomplished by them; since, if it were allowable to take any wife, or as many wives as one chooses, and how he chooses, which the men of your nation do over all the earth, wherever they sojourn, or wherever they have been sent, taking women under the name of marriage, much more would David have been permitted to do this.”


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xv Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 42
    Ezek. i. 1.

    of God, and the cherubim, and their wheels, and when he had recounted the mystery of the whole of that progression, and had beheld the likeness of a throne above them, and upon the throne a likeness as of the figure of a man, and the things which were upon his loins as the figure of amber, and what was below like the sight of fire, and when he set forth all the rest of the vision of the thrones, lest any one might happen to think that in those [visions] he had actually seen God, he added: “This was the appearance of the likeness of the glory of God.”4095

    4095


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 43
    Ezek. ii. 1.


    Anf-02 ii.ii.ii Pg 3.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 55.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.ii Pg 18


    Anf-01 v.xix.iv Pg 3
    Jer. x. 23.

    For the military guard [under which I am kept] hinders my purpose, and does not permit me to go further. Nor indeed, in the state I am now in, can I either do or suffer anything. Wherefore deeming the practice of writing the second resource of friends for their mutual encouragement, I salute thy sacred soul, beseeching of thee to add still further to thy vigour. For our present labour is but little, while the reward which is expected is great.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxvi Pg 8
    Ps. ii. 7, 8; Heb. i. 5.

    And again He saith to Him, “Sit Thou at My right hand, until I make Thine enemies Thy footstool.”160

    160


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxii Pg 11
    Ps. ii. 8.

    And as from the multitude of his sons the prophets of the Lord [afterwards] arose, there was every necessity that Jacob should beget sons from the two sisters, even as Christ did from the two laws of one and the same Father; and in like manner also from the handmaids, indicating that Christ should raise up sons of God, both from freemen and from slaves after the flesh, bestowing upon all, in the same manner, the gift of the Spirit, who vivifies us.4122

    4122 The text of this sentence is in great confusion, and we can give only a doubtful translation.

    But he (Jacob) did all things for the sake of the younger, she who had the handsome eyes,4123

    4123 [Leah’s eyes were weak, according to the LXX.; and Irenæus infers that Rachel’s were “beautiful exceedingly.” Canticles, i. 15.]

    Rachel, who prefigured the Church, for which Christ endured patiently; who at that time, indeed, by means of His patriarchs and prophets, was prefiguring and declaring beforehand future things, fulfilling His part by anticipation in the dispensations of God, and accustoming His inheritance to obey God, and to pass through the world as in a state of pilgrimage, to follow His word, and to indicate beforehand things to come. For with God there is nothing without purpose or due signification.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xx Pg 18.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xii Pg 3
    Ps. ii. 7, 8.

    For you will not be able to affirm that “son” to be David rather than Christ; or the “bounds of the earth” to have been promised rather to David, who reigned within the single (country of) Judea, than to Christ, who has already taken captive the whole orb with the faith of His gospel; as He says through Isaiah:  “Behold, I have given Thee for a covenant1380

    1380 Dispositionem; Gr. διαθήκην.

    of my family, for a light of Gentiles, that Thou mayst open the eyes of the blind”—of course, such as err—“to outloose from bonds the bound”—that is, to free them from sins—“and from the house of prison”—that is, of death—“such as sit in darkness”1381

    1381


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 36
    Ps. ii. 8.

    If, indeed, he has some things of his own, the whole of which he might give to his son, along with the man of the Creator, then show some one thing of them all, as a sample, that I may believe; lest I should have as much reason not to believe that all things belong to him, of whom I see nothing, as I have ground for believing that even the things which I see not are His, to whom belongs the universe, which I see.  But “no man knoweth who the Father is, but the Son; and who the Son is, but the Father, and he to whom the Son will reveal Him.”4499

    4499


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxix Pg 40
    Ps. ii. 8.

    “And all that glory shall serve Him; His dominion shall be an everlasting one, which shall not be taken from Him, and His kingdom that which shall not be destroyed,”5052

    5052


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xvii Pg 20
    Ps. ii. 8.

    It was He who “wrought in Christ His mighty power, by raising Him from the dead, and setting Him at His own right hand, and putting all things under His feet5966

    5966


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 14


    Npnf-201 iii.viii.viii Pg 22


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.vii Pg 40.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 4.3


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 9
    Literally, “in hope of His faith.”

    <index subject1="Purification" title="139" id="vi.ii.iv-p9.1"/>Now, being desirous to write many things to you, not as your teacher, but as becometh one who loves you, I have taken care not to fail to write to you from what I myself possess, with a view to your purification.1476

    1476 The Greek is here incorrect and unintelligible; and as the Latin omits the clause, our translation is merely conjectural. Hilgenfeld’s text, if we give a somewhat peculiar meaning to ἐλλιπεῖν, may be translated: “but as it is becoming in one who loves you not to fail in giving you what we have, I, though the very offscouring of you, have been eager to write to you.”

    We take earnest1477

    1477


    Anf-01 ix.viii.xxv Pg 2
    Num. xxxi. 3.

    For this man (Balaam), when he speaks no longer in the Spirit of God, but contrary to God’s law, by setting up a different law with regard to fornication,4838

    4838 Num. xxxi. 16.

    is certainly not then to be counted as a prophet, but as a soothsayer. For he who did not keep to the commandment of God, received the just recompense of his own evil devices.4839

    4839


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 2
    1 Sam. xv. 22.

    David also says: “Sacrifice and oblation Thou didst not desire, but mine ears hast Thou perfected;4008

    4008


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxix Pg 13
    Zech. ix. 15, 16 (Septuagint).

    etc. And that you may not suppose that these predictions refer to such sufferings as await them from so many wars with strangers,5026

    5026 Allophylis.

    consider the nature (of the sufferings).  In a prophecy of wars which were to be waged with legitimate arms, no one would think of enumerating stones as weapons, which are better known in popular crowds and unarmed tumults.  Nobody measures the copious streams of blood which flow in war by bowlfuls, nor limits it to what is shed upon a single altar. No one gives the name of sheep to those who fall in battle with arms in hand, and while repelling force with force, but only to those who are slain, yielding themselves up in their own place of duty and with patience, rather than fighting in self-defence. In short, as he says, “they roll as sacred stones,” and not like soldiers fightStones are they, even foundation stones, upon which we are ourselves edified—“built,” as St. Paul says, “upon the foundation of the apostles,”5027

    5027


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxvi Pg 39
    See 2 Sam. v. 6–8.

    —in which respect (I should rather say) that they were a type of people equally blind,4954

    4954 The Marcionites.

    who in after-times would not admit Christ to be the son of David—so, on the contrary, Christ succoured the blind man, to show by this act that He was not David’s son, and how different in disposition He was, kind to the blind, while David ordered them to be slain.4955

    4955


    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.



    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiii Pg 8.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxvi Pg 3
    Ps. xxviii. 7, or some apocryphal book.

    and again, “I laid me down, and slept; I awaked, because Thou art with me;”107

    107


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 10.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxxiii Pg 28
    See Bull’s Works, Vol. V., p. 381.

    I value it chiefly because it proves that the Greek Testament, elsewhere says, disjointedly, what is collected into 1 John v. 7. It is, therefore, Holy Scripture in substance, if not in the letter. What seems to me important, however, is the balance it gives to the whole context, and the defective character of the grammar and logic, if it be stricken out. In the Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate of the Old Testament we have a precisely similar case. Refer to Psa. xiii., alike in the Latin and the Greek, as compared with our English Version.8214

    8214


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xi Pg 14.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiii Pg 26
    Isa. ii. 12 (Sept).

    I can now make out why Marcion’s god was for so long an age concealed. He was, I suppose, waiting until he had learnt all these things from the Creator. He continued his pupillage up to the time of John, and then proceeded forthwith to announce the kingdom of God, saying: “The law and the prophets were until John; since that time the kingdom of God is proclaimed.”4796

    4796


    Anf-02 vi.ii.x Pg 36.1
    *title


    Anf-02 vi.ii.x Pg 36.1
    *title


    Anf-01 viii.ii.ix Pg 2
    [Isa. xliv. 9–20; Jer. x. 3.]

    carving and cutting, casting and hammering, fashion the materials? And often out of vessels of dishonour, by merely changing the form, and making an image of the requisite shape, they make what they call a god; which we consider not only senseless, but to be even insulting to God, who, having ineffable glory and form, thus gets His name attached to things that are corruptible, and require constant service. And that the artificers of these are both intemperate, and, not to enter into particulars, are practised in every vice, you very well know; even their own girls who work along with them they corrupt. What infatuation! that dissolute men should be said to fashion and make gods for your worship, and that you should appoint such men the guardians of the temples where they are enshrined; not recognising that it is unlawful even to think or say that men are the guardians of gods.


    Anf-03 v.viii.iii Pg 4
    Let not those who seem worthy of credit, but teach strange doctrines,1082

    1082


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xiv Pg 3
    Ps. xxxvii. 35–37. “Remnant” probably refers either to the memory or posterity of the righteous.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.v Pg 25.1


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 19


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 60.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 20
    Ps. xxxiv. 19.

    “Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of His saints.”2940

    2940 100:5 118:1 136:1-26


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xiii Pg 4
    Isa. lxvi. 2.


    Anf-01 v.iv.vii Pg 9
    Isa. lxvi. 2.

    And do ye also reverence your bishop as Christ Himself, according as the blessed apostles have enjoined you. He that is within the altar is pure, wherefore also he is obedient to the bishop and presbyters: but he that is without is one that does anything apart from the bishop, the presbyters, and the deacons. Such a person is defiled in his conscience, and is worse than an infidel. <index subject1="Bishop" subject2="duties of" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p9.2"/>For what is the bishop but one who beyond all others possesses all power and authority, so far as it is possible for a man to possess it, who according to his ability has been made an imitator of the Christ of God?773

    773 Some render, “being a resemblance according to the power of Christ.”

    <index subject1="Presbytery" subject2="its function" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p10.1"/>And what is the presbytery but a sacred assembly, the counsellors and assessors of the bishop? <index subject1="Deacons" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p10.2"/><index subject1="James the Just" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p10.3"/>And what are the deacons but imitators of the angelic powers,774

    774 Some read, “imitators of Christ, ministering to the bishop, as Christ to the Father.”

    fulfilling a pure and blameless ministry unto him, as the holy Stephen did to the blessed James, Timothy and Linus to Paul, Anencletus and Clement to Peter? He, therefore, that will not yield obedience to such, must needs be one utterly without God, an impious man who despises Christ, and depreciates His appointments.


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xix Pg 6
    Isa. lxvi. 2. All the preceding clauses are given in Cod. Sin. in distinct lines.

    Thou shalt not be mindful of evil against thy brother. Thou shalt not be of doubtful mind1692

    1692


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 33.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.iv Pg 36.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 20.1


    Anf-03 iv.iv.iv Pg 3
    Lev. xxvi. 1; Ex. xx. 4; Deut. v. 8. It must of course be borne in mind that Tertullian has defined the meaning of the word idol in the former chapter, and speaks with reference to that definition.

    and by conjoining, “Nor a similitude of the things which are in the heaven, and which are in the earth, and which are in the sea,” has interdicted the servants of God from acts of that kind all the universe over. Enoch had preceded, predicting that “the demons, and the spirits of the angelic apostates,180

    180 Compare de Oratione, c. 23, and de Virg. Vel. c. 7.

    would turn into idolatry all the elements, all the garniture of the universe, all things contained in the heaven, in the sea, in the earth, that they might be consecrated as God, in opposition to God.” All things, therefore, does human error worship, except the Founder of all Himself.  The images of those things are idols; the consecration of the images is idolatry. Whatever guilt idolatry incurs, must necessarily be imputed to every artificer of every idol. In short, the same Enoch fore-condemns in general menace both idol-worshippers and idol-makers together. And again:  “I swear to you, sinners, that against the day of perdition of blood181

    181


    Anf-03 iv.iv.v Pg 15
    Ex. xx. 4, etc. [The absurd “brazen serpent” which I have seen in the Church of St. Ambrose, in Milan, is with brazen hardihood affirmed to be the identical serpent which Moses lifted up in the wilderness. But it lacks all symbolic character, as it is not set upon a pole nor in any way fitted to a cross. It greatly resembles a vane set upon a pivot.]

    If you look back, too, to the precept enjoining the subsequently made similitude, do you, too, imitate Moses: make not any likeness in opposition to the law, unless to you, too, God have bidden it.198

    198 [Elucidation I.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 34
    Ex. xx. 4.

    set forth a brazen serpent, placed on a “tree,” in a hanging posture, for a spectacle of healing to Israel, at the time when, after their idolatry,1340

    1340


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.2


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 13
    Deut. xxvii. 15. Cod. Sin. reads, “molten or graven.”

    did so that he might reveal a type of Jesus. <index subject1="Brazen serpent" title="145" id="vi.ii.xii-p13.2"/>Moses then makes a brazen serpent, and places it upon a beam,1617

    1617 Instead of


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 58.1


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 16
    Deut. xxvii. 15.

    But in Leviticus He says: “Go not ye after idols, nor make to yourselves molten gods: I am the Lord your God.”8242

    8242


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 19
    Isa. xliv. 9.

    He removes them from [the category of] gods, but he makes use of the word alone, for this [purpose], that we may know of whom he speaks. Jeremiah also says the same: “The gods that have not made the heavens and earth, let them perish from the earth which is under the heaven.”3345

    3345


    Anf-01 viii.ii.ix Pg 2
    [Isa. xliv. 9–20; Jer. x. 3.]

    carving and cutting, casting and hammering, fashion the materials? And often out of vessels of dishonour, by merely changing the form, and making an image of the requisite shape, they make what they call a god; which we consider not only senseless, but to be even insulting to God, who, having ineffable glory and form, thus gets His name attached to things that are corruptible, and require constant service. And that the artificers of these are both intemperate, and, not to enter into particulars, are practised in every vice, you very well know; even their own girls who work along with them they corrupt. What infatuation! that dissolute men should be said to fashion and make gods for your worship, and that you should appoint such men the guardians of the temples where they are enshrined; not recognising that it is unlawful even to think or say that men are the guardians of gods.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xv Pg 39.2


    Npnf-201 iii.xiii.xiii Pg 9


    Npnf-201 iv.vii.xviii Pg 37


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 237.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 12
    Ps. lxxi. 18.

    Also to the same purport in another Psalm: “O Lord, how are they increased that trouble me!”7885

    7885


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xvii Pg 2
    Gen. xvii. 9–11.

    This same does Ezekiel the prophet say with regard to the Sabbaths: “Also I gave them My Sabbaths, to be a sign between Me and them, that they might know that I am the Lord, that sanctify them.”3984

    3984


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 5
    There is, if the text be genuine, some confusion here.  Melchizedek does not appear to have been, in any sense, “subsequent” to Abraham, for he probably was senior to him; and, moreover, Abraham does not appear to have been “already circumcised” carnally when Melchizedek met him. Comp. Gen. xiv. with Gen. xvii.

    “But again,” (you say) “the son of Moses would upon one occasion have been choked by an angel, if Zipporah,1165

    1165


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 5
    There is, if the text be genuine, some confusion here.  Melchizedek does not appear to have been, in any sense, “subsequent” to Abraham, for he probably was senior to him; and, moreover, Abraham does not appear to have been “already circumcised” carnally when Melchizedek met him. Comp. Gen. xiv. with Gen. xvii.

    “But again,” (you say) “the son of Moses would upon one occasion have been choked by an angel, if Zipporah,1165

    1165


    Anf-03 v.viii.lxi Pg 3
    Ex. xxiv. 8.

    and Elias7750

    7750


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxxv Pg 14
    Gen. ii. 7.

    teaching us that by the participation of life the soul became alive; so that the soul, and the life which it possesses, must be understood as being separate existences. When God therefore bestows life and perpetual duration, it comes to pass that even souls which did not previously exist should henceforth endure [for ever], since God has both willed that they should exist, and should continue in existence. For the will of God ought to govern and rule in all things, while all other things give way to Him, are in subjection, and devoted to His service. Thus far, then, let me speak concerning the creation and the continued duration of the soul.


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxx Pg 3
    Gen. ii. 7.

    He thought, accordingly, that the man first so named existed before the man who was made, and that he who was formed of the earth was afterwards made according to the pre-existent form. And that man was formed of earth, Homer, too, having discovered from the ancient and divine history which says, “Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return,”2579

    2579


    Anf-01 viii.viii.vii Pg 5
    Gen. ii. 7.

    It is evident, therefore, that man made in the image of God was of flesh. Is it not, then, absurd to say, that the flesh made by God in His own image is contemptible, and worth nothing? But that the flesh is with God a precious possession is manifest, first from its being formed by Him, if at least the image is valuable to the former and artist; and besides, its value can be gathered from the creation of the rest of the world. For that on account of which the rest is made, is the most precious of all to the maker.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 2
    Gen. ii. 7.

    It was not angels, therefore, who made us, nor who formed us, neither had angels power to make an image of God, nor any one else, except the Word of the Lord, nor any Power remotely distant from the Father of all things. For God did not stand in need of these [beings], in order to the accomplishing of what He had Himself determined with Himself beforehand should be done, as if He did not possess His own hands. <index subject1="Word, the" subject2="always with the Father" title="487" id="ix.vi.xxi-p2.2"/>For with Him were always present the Word and Wisdom, the Son and the Spirit, by whom and in whom, freely and spontaneously, He made all things, to whom also He speaks, saying, “Let Us make man after Our image and likeness;”4064

    4064


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xvi Pg 10
    Gen. ii. 7.

    Wherefore also the Lord spat on the ground and made clay, and smeared it upon the eyes, pointing out the original fashioning [of man], how it was effected, and manifesting the hand of God to those who can understand by what [hand] man was formed out of the dust. For that which the artificer, the Word, had omitted to form in the womb, [viz., the blind man’s eyes], He then supplied in public, that the works of God might be manifested in him, in order that we might not be seeking out another hand by which man was fashioned, nor another Father; knowing that this hand of God which formed us at the beginning, and which does form us in the womb, has in the last times sought us out who were lost, winning back His own, and taking up the lost sheep upon His shoulders, and with joy restoring it to the fold of life.


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xix Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.ix Pg 14
    Gen. ii. 7.

    that God breathed into man’s nostrils the breath of life, and that man became thereby a living soul, not a life-giving spirit, has distinguished that soul from the condition of the Creator. The work must necessarily be distinct from the workman, and it is inferior to him.  The pitcher will not be the potter, although made by the potter; nor in like manner, will the afflatus, because made by the spirit, be on that account the spirit.  The soul has often been called by the same name as the breath. You should also take care that no descent be made from the breath to a still lower quality.  So you have granted (you say) the infirmity of the soul, which you denied before! Undoubtedly, when you demand for it an equality with God, that is, a freedom from fault, I contend that it is infirm. But when the comparison is challenged with an angel, I am compelled to maintain that the head over all things is the stronger of the two, to whom the angels are ministers,2825

    2825


    Anf-03 iv.xi.iii Pg 16
    Gen. ii. 7.

    —by that inspiration of God, of course. On this point, therefore, nothing further need be investigated or advanced by us. It has its own treatise,1521

    1521 Titulus.

    and its own heretic. I shall regard it as my introduction to the other branches of the subject.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxiv Pg 17
    םרָאָהָ, homo, from המָרַאְַהָ, humus, the ground; see the Hebrew of Gen. ii. 7.

    “And the Lord God made man of the dust of the ground,” not of spiritual essence; this afterwards came from the divine afflatus:  “and man became a living soul.”  What, then, is man? Made, no doubt of it, of the dust; and God placed him in paradise, because He moulded him, not breathed him, into being—a fabric of flesh, not of spirit. Now, this being the case, with what face will you contend for the perfect character of that goodness which did not fail in some one particular only of man’s deliverance, but in its general capacity? If that is a plenary grace and a substantial mercy which brings salvation to the soul alone, this were the better life which we now enjoy whole and entire; whereas to rise again but in part will be a chastisement, not a liberation.  The proof of the perfect goodness is, that man, after his rescue, should be delivered from the domicile and power of the malignant deity unto the protection of the most good and merciful GodPoor dupe of Marcion, fever2634

    2634 Febricitas.

    is hard upon you; and your painful flesh produces a crop of all sorts of briers and thorns. Nor is it only to the Creator’s thunderbolts that you lie exposed, or to wars, and pestilences, and His other heavier strokes, but even to His creeping insects. In what respect do you suppose yourself liberated from His kingdom when His flies are still creeping upon your face? If your deliverance lies in the future, why not also in the present, that it may be perfectly wrought? Far different is our condition in the sight of Him who is the Author, the Judge, the injured2635

    2635 Offensum, probably in respect of the Marcionite treatment of His attributes.

    Head of our race! You display Him as a merely good God; but you are unable to prove that He is perfectly good, because you are not by Him perfectly delivered.


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xxvi Pg 9
    Gen. ii. 7.

    Nor could God have known man in the womb, except in his entire nature: “And before thou camest forth out of the womb, I sanctified thee.”1693

    1693


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 9
    Gen. ii. 7.

    Now this is undoubtedly6373

    6373 Utique.

    the correct and fitting mode for the narrative.  First comes a prefatory statement, then follow the details in full;6374

    6374 Prosequi.

    first the subject is named, then it is described.6375

    6375 Primo præfari, postea prosequi; nominare, deinde describere. This properly is an abstract statement, given with Tertullian’s usual terseness: “First you should (‘decet’) give your preface, then follow up with details:  first name your subject, then describe it.”

    How absurd is the other view of the account,6376

    6376 Alioquin.

    when even before he6377

    6377 Hermogenes, whose view of the narrative is criticised.

    had premised any mention of his subject, i.e. Matter, without even giving us its name, he all on a sudden promulged its form and condition, describing to us its quality before mentioning its existence,—pointing out the figure of the thing formed, but concealing its name! But how much more credible is our opinion, which holds that Scripture has only subjoined the arrangement of the subject after it has first duly described its formation and mentioned its name!  Indeed, how full and complete6378

    6378 Integer.

    is the meaning of these words: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth; but6379

    6379 Autem.

    the earth was without form, and void,”6380

    6380


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxi Pg 12
    Gen. ii. 7.

    Now, although it here mentions the nostrils,6453

    6453 Both in the quotation and here, Tertullian read “faciem” where we read “nostrils.”

    it does not say that they were made by God; so again it speaks of skin6454

    6454 Cutem: another reading has “costam,” rib.

    and bones, and flesh and eyes, and sweat and blood, in subsequent passages,6455

    6455


    Anf-03 v.vii.xvii Pg 6
    Gen. ii. 7.

    As, then, the first Adam is thus introduced to us, it is a just inference that the second Adam likewise, as the apostle has told us, was formed by God into a quickening spirit out of the ground,—in other words, out of a flesh which was unstained as yet by any human generation. But that I may lose no opportunity of supporting my argument from the name of Adam, why is Christ called Adam by the apostle, unless it be that, as man, He was of that earthly origin? And even reason here maintains the same conclusion, because it was by just the contrary7184

    7184 Æmula.

    operation that God recovered His own image and likeness, of which He had been robbed by the devil. For it was while Eve was yet a virgin, that the ensnaring word had crept into her ear which was to build the edifice of death. Into a virgin’s soul, in like manner, must be introduced that Word of God which was to raise the fabric of life; so that what had been reduced to ruin by this sex, might by the selfsame sex be recovered to salvation. As Eve had believed the serpent, so Mary believed the angel.7185

    7185 Literally, “Gabriel.”

    The delinquency which the one occasioned by believing, the other by believing effaced.  But (it will be said) Eve did not at the devil’s word conceive in her womb. Well, she at all events conceived; for the devil’s word afterwards became as seed to her that she should conceive as an outcast, and bring forth in sorrow.  Indeed she gave birth to a fratricidal devil; whilst Mary, on the contrary, bare one who was one day to secure salvation to Israel, His own brother after the flesh, and the murderer of Himself. God therefore sent down into the virgin’s womb His Word, as the good Brother, who should blot out the memory of the evil brother. Hence it was necessary that Christ should come forth for the salvation of man, in that condition of flesh into which man had entered ever since his condemnation.


    Anf-03 v.viii.v Pg 9
    Literally, “if he be known beyond the bishop.”

    than the bishop, he is ruined. <index subject1="Marriage" title="95" id="v.viii.v-p9.1"/>But it becomes both men and women who marry, to form their union with the approval of the bishop, that their marriage may be according to the Lord, and not after their own lust. Let all things be done to the honour of God.1098

    1098


    Anf-03 v.viii.liii Pg 5
    Compare ver. 45 with Gen. ii. 7.

    Now since Adam was the first man, since also the flesh was man prior to the soul7690

    7690 See this put more fully above, c. v., near the end.

    it undoubtedly follows that it was the flesh that became the living soul. Moreover, since it was a bodily substance that assumed this condition, it was of course the natural (or animate) body that became the living soul. By what designation would they have it called, except that which it became through the soul, except that which it was not previous to the soul, except that which it can never be after the soul, but through its resurrection? For after it has recovered the soul, it once more becomes the natural (or animate) body, in order that it may become a spiritual body. For it only resumes in the resurrection the condition which it once had. There is therefore by no means the same good reason why the soul should be called the natural (or animate) body, which the flesh has for bearing that designation. The flesh, in fact, was a body before it was an animate body. When the flesh was joined by the soul,7691

    7691 Animata.

    it then became the natural (or animate) body.  Now, although the soul is a corporeal substance,7692

    7692 See the De Anima, v.–ix., for a full statement of Tertullian’s view of the soul’s corporeality.

    yet, as it is not an animated body, but rather an animating one, it cannot be called the animate (or natural) body, nor can it become that thing which it produces. It is indeed when the soul accrues to something else that it makes that thing animate; but unless it so accrues, how will it ever produce animation?  As therefore the flesh was at first an animate (or natural) body on receiving the soul, so at last will it become a spiritual body when invested with the spirit. Now the apostle, by severally adducing this order in Adam and in Christ, fairly distinguishes between the two states, in the very essentials of their difference. And when he calls Christ “the last Adam,”7693

    7693


    Anf-03 v.viii.v Pg 10
    Comp. 1 Cor. x. 31.



    ecf19Oz85z89; 100:5


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 34
    Ex. xxxiv. 6, 7.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 34
    Ex. xxxiv. 6, 7.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxxv Pg 5
    Isa. ii. 5 f.

    even so it is necessary for us here to observe that there are two seeds of Judah, and two races, as there are two houses of Jacob: the one begotten by blood and flesh, the other by faith and the Spirit.


    Anf-03 v.viii.xxxi Pg 3
    Mal. iv. 2, 3.

    And again, (Isaiah says): “Your heart shall rejoice, and your bones shall spring up like the grass,”7491

    7491


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 27
    146:1


    Anf-01 ix.iv.ix Pg 11
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    But that He did Himself make all things freely, and as He pleased, again David says, “But our God is in the heavens above, and in the earth; He hath made all things whatsoever He pleased.”3372

    3372


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxiii Pg 3
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    And again, “All things were made by Him, and without Him was nothing made.”2931

    2931


    Anf-02 iv.ii.i.vii Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.iv Pg 39.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.v.xlv Pg 5
    Spiritu Ipsius: “by His Spirit.” See Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    He is the Lord’s right hand,6596

    6596


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 14
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    —that is to say, by the Spirit (or Divine Nature) which was in the Word: thus is it evident that it is one and the same power which is in one place described under the name of Wisdom, and in another passage under the appellation of the Word, which was initiated for the works of God7835

    7835


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 9
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    Now this Word, the Power of God and the Wisdom of God, must be the very Son of God.  So that, if (He did) all things by the Son, He must have stretched out the heavens by the Son, and so not have stretched them out alone, except in the sense in which He is “alone” (and apart) from all other gods. Accordingly He says, concerning the Son, immediately afterwards: “Who else is it that frustrateth the tokens of the liars, and maketh diviners mad, turning wise men backward, and making their knowledge foolish, and confirming the words7996

    7996


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 14
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    Inasmuch, then, as the heaven was prepared when Wisdom was present in the Word, and since all things were made by the Word, it is quite correct to say that even the Son stretched out the heaven alone, because He alone ministered to the Father’s work. It must also be He who says, “I am the First, and to all futurity I AM.”8001

    8001


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 11
    Ps. xxxiii. 9, Ps. cxlviii. 5.

    Whom, therefore, shall we believe as to the creation of the world—these heretics who have been mentioned that prate so foolishly and inconsistently on the subject, or the disciples of the Lord, and Moses, who was both a faithful servant of God and a prophet? He at first narrated the formation of the world in these words: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth,”2996

    2996


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.ii Pg 14


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 60


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xx Pg 9
    Ps. xcvi. 5. The LXX. in whose version ed. Tisch. it is Ps. xcv. read δαιμόνια, like Tertullian. Our version has “idols.”

    But this has been laid by me rather as a foundation for ensuing observations.  However, it is a defect of custom to say, “By Hercules, So help me the god of faith;”329

    329 Mehercule. Medius Fidius. I have given the rendering of the latter, which seems preferred by Paley (Ov. Fast. vi. 213, note), who considers it = me dius (i.e., Deus) fidius juvet.  Smith (Lat. Dict. s.v.) agrees with him, and explains it, me deus fidius servet. White and Riddle (s.v.) take the me (which appears to be short) as a “demonstrative” particle or prefix, and explain, “By the God of truth!” “As true as heaven,” “Most certainly.”

    while to the custom is added the ignorance of some, who are ignorant that it is an oath by Hercules. Further, what will an oath be, in the name of gods whom you have forsworn, but a collusion of faith with idolatry? For who does not honour them in whose name he swears?


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    and all other things in succession; but neither gods nor angels [had any share in the work].


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxviii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    then the sun, and the moon, and the stars. For having learned this in Egypt, and having been much taken with what Moses had written in the Genesis of the world, he fabled that Vulcan had made in the shield of Achilles a kind of representation of the creation of the world. For he wrote thus:2568

    2568 Iliad, xviii. 483.

    “There he described the earth, the heaven, the sea, The sun that rests not, and the moon full-orb’d; There also, all the stars which round about, As with a radiant frontlet, bind the skies.”


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 2
    Gen. i. 1.

    for, as they maintain, by naming these four,—God, beginning, heaven, and earth,—he set forth their Tetrad. Indicating also its invisible and hidden nature, he said, “Now the earth was invisible and unformed.”2880

    2880


    Anf-02 iii.ii.v Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 17.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.iii Pg 11
    Gen. i. 1.

    and as long as He continued making, one after the other, those things of which He was to be the Lord, it merely mentions God.  “And God said,” “and God made,” “and God saw;”6160

    6160


    Anf-03 v.v.xix Pg 6
    Gen. i. 1.

    just as it would have said, “At last God made the heaven and the earth,” if God had created these after all the rest.  Now, if the beginning is a substance, the end must also be material. No doubt, a substantial thing6320

    6320 Substantivum aliquid.

    may be the beginning of some other thing which may be formed out of it; thus the clay is the beginning of the vessel, and the seed is the beginning of the plant. But when we employ the word beginning in this sense of origin, and not in that of order, we do not omit to mention also the name of that particular thing which we regard as the origin of the other. On the other hand,6321

    6321 De cetero.

    if we were to make such a statement as this, for example, “In the beginning the potter made a basin or a water-jug,” the word beginning will not here indicate a material substance (for I have not mentioned the clay, which is the beginning in this sense, but only the order of the work, meaning that the potter made the basin and the jug first, before anything else—intending afterwards to make the rest. It is, then, to the order of the works that the word beginning has reference, not to the origin of their substances. I might also explain this word beginning in another way, which would not, however, be inapposite.6322

    6322 Non ab re tamen.

    The Greek term for beginning, which is ἀρχή, admits the sense not only of priority of order, but of power as well; whence princes and magistrates are called ἀρχοντες. Therefore in this sense too, beginning may be taken for princely authority and power. It was, indeed, in His transcendent authority and power, that God made the heaven and the earth.


    Anf-03 v.v.xx Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    —“and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  All things were made by Him, and without Him nothing was made.”6333

    6333


    Anf-03 v.v.xxii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 1.

    I revere6345

    6345 Adoro: reverently admire.

    the fulness of His Scripture, in which He manifests to me both the Creator and the creation. In the gospel, moreover, I discover a Minister and Witness of the Creator, even His Word.6346

    6346


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 3
    Gen. i. 1.

    The Scripture, which at its very outset proposes to run through the order thereof tells us as its first information that it was created; it next proceeds to set forth what sort of earth it was.6367

    6367 Qualitatem ejus: unless this means “how He made it,” like the “qualiter fecerit” below.

    In like manner with respect to the heaven, it informs us first of its creation—“In the beginning God made the heaven:”6368

    6368


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    it then goes on to introduce its arrangement; how that God both separated “the water which was below the firmament from that which was above the firmament,”6369

    6369


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 29
    Cum cælo separavit: Gen. i. 1.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    They will have it, moreover, that he spoke of the second Tetrad, the offspring of the first, in this way—by naming an abyss and darkness, in which were also water, and the Spirit moving upon the water. Then, proceeding to mention the Decad, he names light, day, night, the firmament, the evening, the morning, dry land, sea, plants, and, in the tenth place, trees. Thus, by means of these ten names, he indicated the ten Æons. The power of the Duodecad, again, was shadowed forth by him thus:—He names the sun, moon, stars, seasons, years, whales, fishes, reptiles, birds, quadrupeds, wild beasts, and after all these, in the twelfth place, man. Thus they teach that the Triacontad was spoken of through Moses by the Spirit. Moreover, man also, being formed after the image of the power above, had in himself that ability which flows from the one source. This ability was seated in the region of the brain, from which four faculties proceed, after the image of the Tetrad above, and these are called: the first, sight, the second, hearing, the third, smell, and the fourth,2881

    2881 One of the senses was thus capriciously cancelled by these heretics.

    taste. And they say that the Ogdoad is indicated by man in this way: that he possesses two ears, the like number of eyes, also two nostrils, and a twofold taste, namely, of bitter and sweet. Moreover, they teach that the whole man contains the entire image of the Triacontad as follows: In his hands, by means of his fingers, he bears the Decad; and in his whole body the Duodecad, inasmuch as his body is divided into twelve members; for they portion that out, as the body of Truth is divided by them—a point of which we have already spoken.2882

    2882 See above, chap. xiv. 2.

    But the Ogdoad, as being unspeakable and invisible, is understood as hidden in the viscera.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvi Pg 11
    Gen. i. 2.

    Whose kingdom shall I wish to come—his, of whom I never heard as the king of glory; or His, in whose hand are even the hearts of kings? Who shall give me my daily4537

    4537


    Anf-03 v.v.xxiii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    For he resolves6350

    6350 Redigit in.

    the word earth into Matter, because that which is made out of it is the earth.  And to the word was he gives the same direction, as if it pointed to what had always existed unbegotten and unmade. It was without form, moreover, and void, because he will have Matter to have existed shapeless and confused, and without the finish of a maker’s hand.6351

    6351 Inconditam: we have combined the two senses of the word.

    Now these opinions of his I will refute singly; but first I wish to say to him, by way of general answer: We are of opinion that Matter is pointed at in these terms. But yet does the Scripture intimate that, because Matter was in existence before all, anything of like condition6352

    6352 Tale aliquid.

    was even formed out of it? Nothing of the kind. Matter might have had existence, if it so pleased—or rather if Hermogenes so pleased. It might, I say, have existed, and yet God might not have made anything out of it, either as it was unsuitable to Him to have required the aid of anything, or at least because He is not shown to have made anything out of Matter. Its existence must therefore be without a cause, you will say. Oh, no! certainly6353

    6353 Plane: ironical.

    not without cause. For even if the world were not made out of it, yet a heresy has been hatched there from; and a specially impudent one too, because it is not Matter which has produced the heresy, but the heresy has rather made Matter itself.


    Anf-03 v.v.xxv Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    Of course, if I were to ask, to which of the two earths the name earth is best suited,6361

    6361 Quæ cui nomen terræ accommodare debeat. This is literally a double question, asking about the fitness of the name, and to which earth it is best adapted.

    I shall be told that the earth which was made derived the appellation from that of which it was made, on the ground that it is more likely that the offspring should get its name from the original, than the original from the offspring. This being the case, another question presents itself to us, whether it is right and proper that this earth which God made should have derived its name from that out of which He made it? For I find from Hermogenes and the rest of the Materialist heretics,6362

    6362 He means those who have gone wrong on the eternity of matter.

    that while the one earth was indeed “without form, and void,” this one of ours obtained from God in an equal degree6363

    6363 Proinde.

    both form, and beauty, and symmetry; and therefore that the earth which was created was a different thing from that out of which it was created. Now, having become a different thing, it could not possibly have shared with the other in its name, after it had declined from its condition. If earth was the proper name of the (original) Matter, this world of ours, which is not Matter, because it has become another thing, is unfit to bear the name of earth, seeing that that name belongs to something else, and is a stranger to its nature. But (you will tell me) Matter which has undergone creation, that is, our earth, had with its original a community of name no less than of kind. By no means. For although the pitcher is formed out of the clay, I shall no longer call it clay, but a pitcher; so likewise, although electrum6364

    6364 A mixed metal, of the colour of amber.

    is compounded of gold and silver, I shall yet not call it either gold or silver, but electrum. When there is a departure from the nature of any thing, there is likewise a relinquishment of its name—with a propriety which is alike demanded by the designation and the condition. How great a change indeed from the condition of that earth, which is Matter, has come over this earth of ours, is plain even from the fact that the latter has received this testimony to its goodness in Genesis, “And God saw that it was good;”6365

    6365


    Anf-03 v.v.xxx Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    as if these blended6427

    6427 Confusæ.

    substances, presented us with arguments for his massive pile of Matter.6428

    6428 Massalis illius molis.

    Now, so discriminating an enumeration of certain and distinct elements (as we have in this passage), which severally designates “darkness,” “the deep,” “the Spirit of God,” “the waters,” forbids the inference that anything confused or (from such confusion) uncertain is meant. Still more, when He ascribed to them their own places,6429

    6429 Situs.

    darkness on the face of the deep,” “the Spirit upon the face of the waters,” He repudiated all confusion in the substances; and by demonstrating their separate position,6430

    6430 Dispositionem.

    He demonstrated also their distinction.  Most absurd, indeed, would it be that Matter, which is introduced to our view as “without form,” should have its “formless” condition maintained by so many words indicative of form,6431

    6431 Tot formarum vocabulis.

    without any intimation of what that confused body6432

    6432 Corpus confusionis.

    is, which must of course be supposed to be unique,6433

    6433 Unicum.

    since it is without form.6434

    6434 Informe.

    For that which is without form is uniform; but even6435

    6435 Autem.

    that which is without form, when it is blended together6436

    6436 Confusum.

    from various component parts,6437

    6437 Ex varietate.

    must necessarily have one outward appearance;6438

    6438 Unam speciem.

    and it has not any appearance, until it has the one appearance (which comes) from many parts combined.6439

    6439 Unam ex multis speciem.

    Now Matter either had those specific parts6440

    6440 Istas species.

    within itself, from the words indicative of which it had to be understood—I mean “darkness,” and “the deep,” and “the Spirit,” and “the waters”—or it had them not. If it had them, how is it introduced as being “without form?”6441

    6441 Non habens formas.

    If it had them not, how does it become known?6442

    6442 Agnoscitur.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 8
    De spiritu. This shows that Tertullian took the spirit of Gen. i. 2 in the inferior sense.

    also Amos says, “He that strengtheneth the thunder6462

    6462 So also the Septuagint.

    , and createth the wind, and declareth His Christ6463

    6463 So also the Septuagint.

    unto men;”6464

    6464


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 19
    Gen. i. 2.

    refers to Matter, as indeed do all those other Scriptures here and there,6473

    6473 In disperso.

    which demonstrate that the separate parts were made out of Matter. It must follow, then,6474

    6474 Ergo: Tertullian’s answer.

    that as earth consisted of earth, so also depth consisted of depth, and darkness of darkness, and the wind and waters of wind and waters. And, as we said above,6475

    6475 Ch. xxx., towards the end.

    Matter could not have been without form, since it had specific parts, which were formed out of it—although as separate things6476

    6476 Ut et aliæ.

    —unless, indeed, they were not separate, but were the very same with those out of which they came. For it is really impossible that those specific things, which are set forth under the same names, should have been diverse; because in that case6477

    6477 Jam.

    the operation of God might seem to be useless,6478

    6478 Otiosa.

    if it made things which existed already; since that alone would be a creation,6479

    6479 Generatio: creation in the highest sense of matter issuing from the maker. Another reading has “generosiora essent,” for our “generatio sola esset,” meaning that, “those things would be nobler which had not been made,” which is obviously quite opposed to Tertullian’s argument.

    when things came into being, which had not been (previously) made. Therefore, to conclude, either Moses then pointed to Matter when he wrote the words: “And darkness was on the face of the deep, and the spirit of God moved on the face of the waters;” or else, inasmuch as these specific parts of creation are afterwards shown in other passages to have been made by God, they ought to have been with equal explicitness6480

    6480 Æque.

    shown to have been made out of the Matter which, according to you, Moses had previously mentioned;6481

    6481 Præmiserat.

    or else, finally, if Moses pointed to those specific parts, and not to Matter, I want to know where Matter has been pointed out at all.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.ix.xii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 6, 7.

    and God also said, “Let there be lights (in the firmament); and so God made a greater and a lesser light.”7901

    7901


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 10
    Gen. i. 6, 7, 8.

    the suspension of “the dry land” He accomplished by “separating the waters.” After the world had been hereupon set in order through its elements, when inhabitants were given it, “the waters” were the first to receive the precept “to bring forth living creatures.”8559

    8559 Animas.

    Water was the first to produce that which had life, that it might be no wonder in baptism if waters know how to give life.8560

    8560 Animare.

    For was not the work of fashioning man himself also achieved with the aid of waters?  Suitable material is found in the earth, yet not apt for the purpose unless it be moist and juicy; which (earth) “the waters,” separated the fourth day before into their own place, temper with their remaining moisture to a clayey consistency. If, from that time onward, I go forward in recounting universally, or at more length, the evidences of the “authority” of this element which I can adduce to show how great is its power or its grace; how many ingenious devices, how many functions, how useful an instrumentality, it affords the world, I fear I may seem to have collected rather the praises of water than the reasons of baptism; although I should thereby teach all the more fully, that it is not to be doubted that God has made the material substance which He has disposed throughout all His products8561

    8561 Rebus.

    and works, obey Him also in His own peculiar sacraments; that the material substance which governs terrestrial life acts as agent likewise in the celestial.


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 20
    Jer. x. 11.

    For, from the fact of his having subjoined their destruction, he shows them to be no gods at all. Elias, too, when all Israel was assembled at Mount Carmel, wishing to turn them from idolatry, says to them, “How long halt ye between two opinions?3346

    3346 Literally, “In both houghs,” in ambabus suffraginibus.

    If the Lord be God,3347

    3347 The old Latin translation has, “Si unus est Dominus Deus”—If the Lord God is one; which is supposed by the critics to have occurred through carelessness of the translator.

    follow Him.”3348

    3348


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 8.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiv Pg 35
    Amos ix. 6.

    certainly not for Himself alone, but for His people also, who will be with Him. “And Thou shalt bind them about Thee,” says he, “like the adornment of a bride.”3468

    3468


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 48
    Ascensum in cœlum: Sept. ἀνάβασιν εἰς τὸν οὐρανόν, Amos ix. 6. See on this passage the article Heaven in Kitto’s Cyclopædia (3d edit.), vol. ii. p. 245, where the present writer has discussed the probable meaning of the verse.

    which Christ “builds”—of course for His people.  There also is that everlasting abode of which Isaiah asks, “Who shall declare unto you the eternal place, but He (that is, of course, Christ) who walketh in righteousness, speaketh of the straight path, hateth injustice and iniquity?”4849

    4849


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 55
    See Isa. lii. 7, xxxiii. 14 (Sept.), and Amos ix. 6.

    Down in hell, however, it was said concerning them: “They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them!”—even those who did not believe them or at least did not sincerely4856

    4856 Omnino.

    believe that after death there were punishments for the arrogance of wealth and the glory of luxury, announced indeed by Moses and the prophets, but decreed by that God, who deposes princes from their thrones, and raiseth up the poor from dunghills.4857

    4857


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    and all other things in succession; but neither gods nor angels [had any share in the work].


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxviii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    then the sun, and the moon, and the stars. For having learned this in Egypt, and having been much taken with what Moses had written in the Genesis of the world, he fabled that Vulcan had made in the shield of Achilles a kind of representation of the creation of the world. For he wrote thus:2568

    2568 Iliad, xviii. 483.

    “There he described the earth, the heaven, the sea, The sun that rests not, and the moon full-orb’d; There also, all the stars which round about, As with a radiant frontlet, bind the skies.”


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 2
    Gen. i. 1.

    for, as they maintain, by naming these four,—God, beginning, heaven, and earth,—he set forth their Tetrad. Indicating also its invisible and hidden nature, he said, “Now the earth was invisible and unformed.”2880

    2880


    Anf-02 iii.ii.v Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 17.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.iii Pg 11
    Gen. i. 1.

    and as long as He continued making, one after the other, those things of which He was to be the Lord, it merely mentions God.  “And God said,” “and God made,” “and God saw;”6160

    6160


    Anf-03 v.v.xix Pg 6
    Gen. i. 1.

    just as it would have said, “At last God made the heaven and the earth,” if God had created these after all the rest.  Now, if the beginning is a substance, the end must also be material. No doubt, a substantial thing6320

    6320 Substantivum aliquid.

    may be the beginning of some other thing which may be formed out of it; thus the clay is the beginning of the vessel, and the seed is the beginning of the plant. But when we employ the word beginning in this sense of origin, and not in that of order, we do not omit to mention also the name of that particular thing which we regard as the origin of the other. On the other hand,6321

    6321 De cetero.

    if we were to make such a statement as this, for example, “In the beginning the potter made a basin or a water-jug,” the word beginning will not here indicate a material substance (for I have not mentioned the clay, which is the beginning in this sense, but only the order of the work, meaning that the potter made the basin and the jug first, before anything else—intending afterwards to make the rest. It is, then, to the order of the works that the word beginning has reference, not to the origin of their substances. I might also explain this word beginning in another way, which would not, however, be inapposite.6322

    6322 Non ab re tamen.

    The Greek term for beginning, which is ἀρχή, admits the sense not only of priority of order, but of power as well; whence princes and magistrates are called ἀρχοντες. Therefore in this sense too, beginning may be taken for princely authority and power. It was, indeed, in His transcendent authority and power, that God made the heaven and the earth.


    Anf-03 v.v.xx Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    —“and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  All things were made by Him, and without Him nothing was made.”6333

    6333


    Anf-03 v.v.xxii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 1.

    I revere6345

    6345 Adoro: reverently admire.

    the fulness of His Scripture, in which He manifests to me both the Creator and the creation. In the gospel, moreover, I discover a Minister and Witness of the Creator, even His Word.6346

    6346


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 3
    Gen. i. 1.

    The Scripture, which at its very outset proposes to run through the order thereof tells us as its first information that it was created; it next proceeds to set forth what sort of earth it was.6367

    6367 Qualitatem ejus: unless this means “how He made it,” like the “qualiter fecerit” below.

    In like manner with respect to the heaven, it informs us first of its creation—“In the beginning God made the heaven:”6368

    6368


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    it then goes on to introduce its arrangement; how that God both separated “the water which was below the firmament from that which was above the firmament,”6369

    6369


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 29
    Cum cælo separavit: Gen. i. 1.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 18
    Gen. i. 9.

    Appear,” says He, not “be made.” It had been already made, only in its invisible condition it was then waiting6415

    6415 Sustinebat: i.e. expectabat (Oehler).

    to appear. “Dry,” because it was about to become such by its severance from the moisture, but yet “land.” “And God called the dry land Earth,”6416

    6416


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 27
    Gen. i. 9.

    Why does He command it to appear, if it were not previously invisible? His purpose was also, that He might thus prevent His having made it in vain, by rendering it visible, and so fit for use. And thus, throughout, proofs arise to us that this earth which we inhabit is the very same which was both created and formed6424

    6424 Ostensam: “manifested” (see note 10, p. 96.)

    by God, and that none other was “Without form, and void,” than that which had been created and formed. It therefore follows that the sentence, “Now the earth was without form, and void,” applies to that same earth which God mentioned separately along with the heaven.6425

    6425


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 20
    Gen. i. 10.

    not Matter. And so, when it afterwards attains its perfection, it ceases to be accounted void, when God declares, “Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed after its kind, and according to its likeness, and the fruit-tree yielding fruit, whose seed is in itself, after its kind.”6417

    6417


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xx Pg 3
    Job xxxviii. 11.

    The ocean, impassable to man, and the worlds beyond it, are regulated by the same enactments of the Lord. The seasons of spring, summer, autumn, and winter, peacefully give place to one another. The winds in their several quarters89

    89 Or, “stations.”

    fulfil, at the proper time, their service without hindrance. The ever-flowing fountains, formed both for enjoyment and health, furnish without fail their breasts for the life of men. The very smallest of living beings meet together in peace and concord. All these the great Creator and Lord of all has appointed to exist in peace and harmony; while He does good to all, but most abundantly to us who have fled for refuge to His compassions through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom be glory and majesty for ever and ever. Amen.
    *title


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 6.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxii Pg 3
    Ps. xxxii. 10.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvi Pg 20.1


    Anf-01 v.vii.vii Pg 9
    Zech. iii. 1.

    the son of Josedech, who sought to “sift the faith1023

    1023


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxix Pg 7
    Zech. iii. 1.

    And again, it is written in Job,2255

    2255


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxv Pg 3
    Zech. ii. 10–13, Zech. iii. 1, 2.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiv Pg 19
    See Zech. iii. “The mystery of His name” refers to the meaning of “Jeshua,” for which see c. ix. above.

    First, He was clad in “sordid attire,” that is, in the indignity of passible and mortal flesh, when the devil, withal, was opposing himself to Him—the instigator, to wit, of Judas the traitor1462

    1462


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.vii Pg 22
    See Zech. iii.

    If I may offer, moreover, an interpretation of the two goats which were presented on “the great day of atonement,”3200

    3200


    Anf-01 viii.iv.c Pg 6
    It is not easy, says Maranus, to say in what Scripture Christ is so called. [Clearly he refers to the Dayspring (St. Luke i. 78) as the LXX. render many texts of the O.T. See Zech. iii. 8.] Perhaps Justin had in his mind the passage, “This the day which the Lord hath made” (Ps. cxviii. 24). Clem. Alex. teaches that Christ is here referred to.

    and the East, and a Sword, and a Stone, and a Rod, and Jacob, and Israel); and that He became man by the Virgin, in order that the disobedience which proceeded from the serpent might receive its destruction in the same manner in which it derived its origin. For Eve, who was a virgin and undefiled, having conceived the word of the serpent, brought forth disobedience and death. But the Virgin Mary received faith and joy, when the angel Gabriel announced the good tidings to her that the Spirit of the Lord would come upon her, and the power of the Highest would overshadow her: wherefore also the Holy Thing begotten of her is the Son of God;2333

    2333


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiv Pg 19
    See Zech. iii. “The mystery of His name” refers to the meaning of “Jeshua,” for which see c. ix. above.

    First, He was clad in “sordid attire,” that is, in the indignity of passible and mortal flesh, when the devil, withal, was opposing himself to Him—the instigator, to wit, of Judas the traitor1462

    1462


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.vii Pg 22
    See Zech. iii.

    If I may offer, moreover, an interpretation of the two goats which were presented on “the great day of atonement,”3200

    3200


    Anf-03 v.vi.iii Pg 6
    Comp. Cant. ii. 15.

    a destroyer of the vineyard of Christ. Have no fellowship897

    897


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxvi Pg 5
    Ps. i. 3.

    Again, the righteous is said to flourish like the palm-tree. God appeared from a tree to Abraham, as it is written, near the oak in Mamre. The people found seventy willows and twelve springs after crossing the Jordan.2290

    2290


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 11
    Ps. i. 3–6.

    Mark how He has described at once both the water and the cross. For these words imply, Blessed are they who, placing their trust in the cross, have gone down into the water; for, says He, they shall receive their reward in due time: then He declares, I will recompense them. But now He saith,1601

    1601 Cod. Sin. has, “what meaneth?”

    “Their leaves shall not fade.” This meaneth, that every word which proceedeth out of your mouth in faith and love shall tend to bring conversion and hope to many. Again, another prophet saith, “And the land of Jacob shall be extolled above every land.”1602

    1602


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 19.1


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 17
    Ps. i. 3.

    “He that hath clean hands and a pure heart, who hath not taken God’s name in vain, nor sworn deceitfully to his neighbour, he shall receive blessing from the Lord, and mercy from the God of his salvation.”2937

    2937


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xx Pg 5
    Jer. xxiii. 23.

    For His hand lays hold of all things, and that it is which illumines the heavens, and lightens also the things which are under the heavens, and trieth the reins and the hearts, is also present in hidden things, and in our secret [thoughts], and does openly nourish and preserve us.


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 7.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.ii Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 120.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.ii Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 120.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 71.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 6.1


    Anf-03 v.viii.xxx Pg 1
    Chapter XXX.—This Vision Interpreted by Tertullian of the Resurrection of the Bodies of the Dead.  A Chronological Error of Our Author, Who Supposes that Ezekiel in His Ch. XXXI. Prophesied Before the Captivity.


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 23.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxvi Pg 3
    Ps. xxviii. 7, or some apocryphal book.

    and again, “I laid me down, and slept; I awaked, because Thou art with me;”107

    107


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 8
    1 Kings x. 1.

    she whom the Lord also referred to as one who should rise up in the judgment with the nations of those men who do hear His words, and do not believe in Him, and should condemn them, inasmuch as she submitted herself to the wisdom announced by the servant of God, while these men despised that wisdom which proceeded directly from the Son of God. For Solomon was a servant, but Christ is indeed the Son of God, and the Lord of Solomon. While, therefore, he served God without blame, and ministered to His dispensations, then was he glorified: but when he took wives from all nations, and permitted them to set up idols in Israel, the Scripture spake thus concerning him: “And King Solomon was a lover of women, and he took to himself foreign women; and it came to pass, when Solomon was old, his heart was not perfect with the Lord his God. And the foreign women turned away his heart after strange gods. And Solomon did evil in the sight of the Lord: he did not walk after the Lord, as did David his father. And the Lord was angry with Solomon; for his heart was not perfect with the Lord, as was the heart of David his father.”4181

    4181


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 9
    1 Kings xi. 1.

    The Scripture has thus sufficiently reproved him, as the presbyter remarked, in order that no flesh may glory in the sight of the Lord.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 9
    I am not acquainted with any such passage. Oehler refers to Isa. xlix. in his margin, but gives no verse, and omits to notice this passage of the present treatise in his index.

    Thus, therefore, before this temporal sabbath, there was withal an eternal sabbath foreshown and foretold; just as before the carnal circumcision there was withal a spiritual circumcision foreshown. In short, let them teach us, as we have already premised, that Adam observed the sabbath; or that Abel, when offering to God a holy victim, pleased Him by a religious reverence for the sabbath; or that Enoch, when translated, had been a keeper of the sabbath; or that Noah the ark-builder observed, on account of the deluge, an immense sabbath; or that Abraham, in observance of the sabbath, offered Isaac his son; or that Melchizedek in his priesthood received the law of the sabbath.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 14.1


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xv Pg 7
    Ps. cxxxix. 23.

    “Why think ye evil in your hearts?”1588

    1588


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iv Pg 40
    Ps. ii. 3; 2.

    All those, therefore, who had been delivered from the yoke of slavery he would earnestly have to obliterate the very mark of slavery—even circumcision, on the authority of the prophet’s prediction. He remembered how that Jeremiah had said, “Circumcise the foreskins of your heart;”5359

    5359


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 29
    Ps. ii. 2.

    —from ignorance of Him, of course. Now nothing can be expounded of another god which is applicable to the Creator; otherwise the apostle would not have been just in reproaching the Jews with ignorance in respect of a god of whom they knew nothing.  For where had been their sin, if they only maintained the righteousness of their own God against one of whom they were ignorant? But he exclaims: “O the depth of the riches and the wisdom of God; how unsearchable also are His ways!”5864

    5864


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 11
    Ps. ii. 2.

    that Lord must be another Being, against whose Christ were gathered together the kings and the rulers. And if, to quote another passage, “Thus saith the Lord to my Lord Christ,”8171

    8171


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxii Pg 9
    Comp. Ps. ii. 2, 3, with Acts iv. 25–30.

    What did the apostles thereupon suffer? You answer:  Every sort of iniquitous persecutions, from men that belonged indeed to that Creator who was the adversary of Him whom they were preaching. Then why does the Creator, if an adversary of Christ, not only predict that the apostles should incur this suffering, but even express His displeasure3407

    3407 Exprobrat.

    thereat? For He ought neither to predict the course of the other god, whom, as you contend, He knew not, nor to have expressed displeasure at that which He had taken care to bring about. “See how the righteous perisheth, and no man layeth it to heart; and how merciful men are taken away, and no man considereth. For the righteous man has been removed from the evil person.”3408

    3408


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 27


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 35


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 8
    1 Kings x. 1.

    she whom the Lord also referred to as one who should rise up in the judgment with the nations of those men who do hear His words, and do not believe in Him, and should condemn them, inasmuch as she submitted herself to the wisdom announced by the servant of God, while these men despised that wisdom which proceeded directly from the Son of God. For Solomon was a servant, but Christ is indeed the Son of God, and the Lord of Solomon. While, therefore, he served God without blame, and ministered to His dispensations, then was he glorified: but when he took wives from all nations, and permitted them to set up idols in Israel, the Scripture spake thus concerning him: “And King Solomon was a lover of women, and he took to himself foreign women; and it came to pass, when Solomon was old, his heart was not perfect with the Lord his God. And the foreign women turned away his heart after strange gods. And Solomon did evil in the sight of the Lord: he did not walk after the Lord, as did David his father. And the Lord was angry with Solomon; for his heart was not perfect with the Lord, as was the heart of David his father.”4181

    4181


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 9
    1 Kings xi. 1.

    The Scripture has thus sufficiently reproved him, as the presbyter remarked, in order that no flesh may glory in the sight of the Lord.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 9
    I am not acquainted with any such passage. Oehler refers to Isa. xlix. in his margin, but gives no verse, and omits to notice this passage of the present treatise in his index.

    Thus, therefore, before this temporal sabbath, there was withal an eternal sabbath foreshown and foretold; just as before the carnal circumcision there was withal a spiritual circumcision foreshown. In short, let them teach us, as we have already premised, that Adam observed the sabbath; or that Abel, when offering to God a holy victim, pleased Him by a religious reverence for the sabbath; or that Enoch, when translated, had been a keeper of the sabbath; or that Noah the ark-builder observed, on account of the deluge, an immense sabbath; or that Abraham, in observance of the sabbath, offered Isaac his son; or that Melchizedek in his priesthood received the law of the sabbath.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 14.1


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xv Pg 7
    Ps. cxxxix. 23.

    “Why think ye evil in your hearts?”1588

    1588


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxviii Pg 0


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 2.2


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 7
    “Eructavit cor. meum Sermonem optimum” is Tertullian’s reading of Ps. xlv. 1, “My heart is inditing a good matter,” A.V., which the Vulgate, Ps. xliv. 1, renders by “Eructavit cor meum verbum bonum,” and the Septuagint by ᾽Εξηρεύξατο ἡ καρδία μου λόγον ἀγαθόν. This is a tolerably literal rendering of the original words, בוֹט רבָרָ יבִּלִ שׁהַרָ. In these words the Fathers used to descry an adumbration of the mystery of the Son’s eternal generation from the Father, and His coming forth in time to create the world.  See Bellarmine, On the Psalms (Paris ed. 1861), vol. i. 292. The Psalm is no doubt eminently Messianic, as both Jewish and Christian writers have ever held. See Perowne, The Psalms, vol. i. p. 216.  Bishop Bull reviews at length the theological opinions of Tertullian, and shows that he held the eternity of the Son of God, whom he calls “Sermo” or “Verbum Dei.” See Defensio Fidei Nicænæ (translation in the “Oxford Library of the Fathers,” by the translator of this work) vol. ii. 509–545. In the same volume, p. 482, the passage from the Psalm before us is similarly applied by Novatian: “Sic Dei Verbum processit, de quo dictum est, Eructavit cor meum Verbum bonum.” [See vol. ii. p. 98, this series: and Kaye, p. 515.]

    Let Marcion take hence his first lesson on the noble fruit of this truly most excellent tree. But, like a most clumsy clown, he has grafted a good branch on a bad stock. The sapling, however, of his blasphemy shall be never strong: it shall wither with its planter, and thus shall be manifested the nature of the good tree. Look at the total result: how fruitful was the Word! God issued His fiat, and it was done: God also saw that it was good;2744

    2744


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 7
    Ps. xlv. 1. [And see Vol. I. p. 213, supra.]

    This will be that “very good word” of blessing which is admitted to be the initiating principle of the New Testament, after the example of the Old. What is there, then, to wonder at, if He entered on His ministry with the very attributes3940

    3940 Affectibus.

    of the Creator, who ever in language of the same sort loved, consoled, protected, and avenged the beggar, and the poor, and the humble, and the widow, and the orphan? So that you may believe this private bounty as it were of Christ to be a rivulet streaming from the springs of salvation. Indeed, I hardly know which way to turn amidst so vast a wealth of good words like these; as if I were in a forest, or a meadow, or an orchard of apples. I must therefore look out for such matter as chance may present to me.3941

    3941 Prout incidit.


    Anf-03 v.v.xviii Pg 24
    On this version of Ps. xlv. 1., and its application by Tertullian, see our Anti-Marcion (p. 299, note 5).

    ), I am not quite sure that evil may not be introduced by good, the stronger by the weak, in the same way as the unbegotten is by the begotten. Therefore on this ground Hermogenes puts Matter even before God, by putting it before the Son. Because the Son is the Word, and “the Word is God,”6313

    6313


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 10
    Ps. xlv. 1. See this reading, and its application, fully discussed in our note 5, p. 66, of the Anti-Marcion, Edin.

    The Father took pleasure evermore in Him, who equally rejoiced with a reciprocal gladness in the Father’s presence:  “Thou art my Son, to-day have I begotten Thee;”7831

    7831


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 4
    For this version of Ps. xlv. 1, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 66, note 5, Edin.

    so you in like manner ought to adduce in opposition to me some text where God has said, “My heart hath emitted Myself as my own most excellent Word,” in such a sense that He is Himself both the Emitter and the Emitted, both He who sent forth and He who was sent forth, since He is both the Word and God. I bid you also observe,7877

    7877 Ecce.

    that on my side I advance the passage where the Father said to the Son, “Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten Thee.”7878

    7878 *title *titles


    Anf-02 iv.ii.i.vi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 7
    Ps. xxxv. (xxxiv. in LXX.) 12.

    and, “What I had not seized I was then paying in full;”1318

    1318


    Anf-02 iv.ii.i.vi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 7
    Ps. xxxv. (xxxiv. in LXX.) 12.

    and, “What I had not seized I was then paying in full;”1318

    1318


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 95
    Isa. ii. 17.

    —it is thus indicated that, after His passion and ascension, God shall cast down under His feet all who were opposed to Him, and He shall be exalted above all, and there shall be no one who can be justified or compared to Him.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.vi Pg 4
    Isa. xii. 4.

    For neither in an ambiguous, nor arrogant, nor boastful manner, does He say these things; but since it was impossible, without God, to come to a knowledge of God, He teaches men, through His Word, to know God. To those, therefore, who are ignorant of these matters, and on this account imagine that they have discovered another Father, justly does one say, “Ye do err, not knowing the Scriptures, nor the power of God.”3846

    3846


    Anf-01 ix.viii.x Pg 2
    Ps. cxxx. 7.


    Anf-03 vi.vii.iii Pg 3
    So Mr. Dodgson; and La Cerda, as quoted by Oehler. See Ps. cxxxi. 1 in LXX., where it is Ps. cxxx.

    but what is that which, in a certain way, has been grasped by hand9027

    9027


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 41
    Isa. x. 33.

    And who are these but the rich? Because they have indeed received their consolation, glory, and honour and a lofty position from their wealth. In Psalm xlviii. He also turns off our care from these and says: “Be not thou afraid when one is made rich, and when his glory is increased: for when he shall die, he shall carry nothing away; nor shall his glory descend along with him.”4021

    4021


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 25


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxvii Pg 4
    Ps. xcix.



    Anf-03 v.iii.iii Pg 15
    1 Sam. viii. 7.

    And Moses declares, “For their murmuring is not against us, but against the Lord God.”656

    656


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 12
    The Latin here departs entirely from the Greek text, and quotes as a saying of “the Son of God” the following precept, nowhere to be found in the New Testament: “Let us resist all iniquity, and hold it in hatred.” Hilgenfeld joins this clause to the former sentence.

    may find no means of entrance, let us flee from every vanity, let us utterly hate the works of the way of wickedness. Do not, by retiring apart, live a solitary life, as if you were already [fully] justified; but coming together in one place, make common inquiry concerning what tends to your general welfare. For the Scripture saith, “Woe to them who are wise to themselves, and prudent in their own sight!”1479

    1479


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vii.xii Pg 65.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 164.2


    Anf-01 ii.ii.viii Pg 4
    Comp. Isa. i. 18.

    than scarlet, and blacker than sackcloth, yet if ye turn to Me with your whole heart, and say, Father! I will listen to you, as to a holy41

    41 These words are not found in Scripture, though they are quoted again by Clem. Alex. (Pædag., i. 10) as from Ezekiel.

    people.” And in another place He speaks thus: “Wash you, and become clean; put away the wickedness of your souls from before mine eyes; cease from your evil ways, and learn to do well; seek out judgment, deliver the oppressed, judge the fatherless, and see that justice is done to the widow; and come, and let us reason together. He declares, Though your sins be like crimson, I will make them white as snow; though they be like scarlet, I will whiten them like wool. And if ye be willing and obey Me, ye shall eat the good of the land; but if ye refuse, and will not hearken unto Me, the sword shall devour you, for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken these things.”42

    42


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 21.1


    Anf-02 vi.v Pg 131.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 23
    Isa. i. 17, 18.

    To him, for whom in every stage of lowliness there is provided so much of the Creator’s compassionate regard, shall be given that kingdom also which is promised by Christ, to whose merciful compassion belong, and for a great while have belonged,3955

    3955 Jamdudum pertinent.

    those to whom the promise is made. For even if you suppose that the promises of the Creator were earthly, but that Christ’s are heavenly, it is quite clear that heaven has been as yet the property of no other God whatever, than Him who owns the earth also; quite clear that the Creator has given even the lesser promises (of earthly blessing), in order that I may more readily believe Him concerning His greater promises (of heavenly blessings) also, than (Marcion’s god), who has never given proof of his liberality by any preceding bestowal of minor blessings. “Blessed are they that hunger, for they shall be filled.”3956

    3956


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 7
    Quæstiones, alluding to Isa. i. 18: δεῦτε καὶ διαλεχθῶμεν, λέγει Κύριος.

    avoid contact with the wicked:2927

    2927


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.x Pg 9
    Isa. i. 18.

    In the scarlet colour He indicates the blood of the prophets; in the crimson, that of the Lord, as the brighter. Concerning the forgiveness of sins, Micah also says: “Who is a God like unto Thee? pardoning iniquity, and passing by the transgressions of the remnant of Thine heritage. He retaineth not His anger as a testimony against them, because He delighteth in mercy. He will turn again, and will have compassion upon us; He wipeth away our iniquities, and casteth our sins into the depths of the sea.”3768

    3768


    Anf-03 v.x.xii Pg 13
    Isa. i. 18.

    When great Babylon likewise is represented as drunk with the blood of the saints,8304

    8304


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxvi Pg 22
    Mic. vi. 8. The last clause agrees with the Septuagint: καὶ ἕτοιμον εἶναι τοῦ πορεύεσθαι μετὰ Κυρίου Θεοῦ σου.

    Now Christ is the man who tells us what is good, even the knowledge of the law. “Thou knowest,” says He, “the commandments.” “To do justly”—“Sell all that thou hast;” “to love mercy”—“Give to the poor:” “and to be ready to walk with God”—“And come,” says He, “follow me.”4937

    4937 The clauses of Christ’s words, which are here adapted to Micah’s, are in every case broken with an inquit.

    The Jewish nation was from its beginning so carefully divided into tribes and clans, and families and houses, that no man could very well have been ignorant of his descent—even from the recent assessments of Augustus, which were still probably extant at this time.4938

    4938 Tunc pendentibus: i.e., at the time mentioned in the story of the blind man.

    But the Jesus of Marcion (although there could be no doubt of a person’s having been born, who was seen to be a man), as being unborn, could not, of course, have possessed any public testimonial4939

    4939 Notitiam.

    of his descent, but was to be regarded as one of that obscure class of whom nothing was in any way known.  Why then did the blind man, on hearing that He was passing by, exclaim, “Jesus, Thou Son of David, have mercy on me?”4940

    4940


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 30.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxix Pg 6
    Job iv. 16–18, Job xv. 15, Job iv. 19–21, Job v. 1–5.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 15.

    and again, “Woe! sinful nation; a people full of sins; wicked sons; ye have quite forsaken God, and have provoked unto indignation the Holy One of Israel.”1169

    1169


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xiv Pg 5
    Isa. i. 15.

    for fear Christ should utterly shudder.  We, however, not only raise, but even expand them; and, taking our model from the Lord’s passion8849

    8849 i.e. from the expansion of the hands on the cross.

    even in prayer we confess8850

    8850 Or, “give praise.”

    to Christ.


    Anf-02 v.ii.xiii Pg 6.2


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 15
    See Mal. i. as above.

    But of the spiritual sacrifices He adds, saying, “And in every place they offer clean sacrifices to my Name, saith the Lord.”1210

    1210


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 16
    See Mal. i. as above.


    95:7 100:3)


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xx Pg 9
    Ps. xcvi. 5. The LXX. in whose version ed. Tisch. it is Ps. xcv. read δαιμόνια, like Tertullian. Our version has “idols.”

    But this has been laid by me rather as a foundation for ensuing observations.  However, it is a defect of custom to say, “By Hercules, So help me the god of faith;”329

    329 Mehercule. Medius Fidius. I have given the rendering of the latter, which seems preferred by Paley (Ov. Fast. vi. 213, note), who considers it = me dius (i.e., Deus) fidius juvet.  Smith (Lat. Dict. s.v.) agrees with him, and explains it, me deus fidius servet. White and Riddle (s.v.) take the me (which appears to be short) as a “demonstrative” particle or prefix, and explain, “By the God of truth!” “As true as heaven,” “Most certainly.”

    while to the custom is added the ignorance of some, who are ignorant that it is an oath by Hercules. Further, what will an oath be, in the name of gods whom you have forsworn, but a collusion of faith with idolatry? For who does not honour them in whose name he swears?


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xx Pg 9
    Ps. xcvi. 5. The LXX. in whose version ed. Tisch. it is Ps. xcv. read δαιμόνια, like Tertullian. Our version has “idols.”

    But this has been laid by me rather as a foundation for ensuing observations.  However, it is a defect of custom to say, “By Hercules, So help me the god of faith;”329

    329 Mehercule. Medius Fidius. I have given the rendering of the latter, which seems preferred by Paley (Ov. Fast. vi. 213, note), who considers it = me dius (i.e., Deus) fidius juvet.  Smith (Lat. Dict. s.v.) agrees with him, and explains it, me deus fidius servet. White and Riddle (s.v.) take the me (which appears to be short) as a “demonstrative” particle or prefix, and explain, “By the God of truth!” “As true as heaven,” “Most certainly.”

    while to the custom is added the ignorance of some, who are ignorant that it is an oath by Hercules. Further, what will an oath be, in the name of gods whom you have forsworn, but a collusion of faith with idolatry? For who does not honour them in whose name he swears?


    Anf-02 vi.ii.x Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.i Pg 28.1


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xiv Pg 2
    Isa. lv. 3 to end.

    Of these and such like words written by the prophets, O Trypho,” said I, “some have reference to the first advent of Christ, in which He is preached as inglorious, obscure, and of mortal appearance: but others had reference to His second advent, when He shall appear in glory and above the clouds; and your nation shall see and know Him whom they have pierced, as Hosea, one of the twelve prophets, and Daniel, foretold.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xii Pg 2
    Isa. lv. 3 ff. according to LXX.

    This same law you have despised, and His new holy covenant you have slighted; and now you neither receive it, nor repent of your evil deeds. ‘For your ears are closed, your eyes are blinded, and the heart is hardened,’ Jeremiah1972

    1972


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xx Pg 9
    Isa. lv. 3.

    Indeed, you will be obliged from these words all the more to understand that Christ is reckoned to spring from David by carnal descent, by reason of His birth3378

    3378 Censum. [Kaye, p. 149.]

    of the Virgin Mary. Touching this promise of Him, there is the oath to David in the psalm, “Of the fruit of thy body3379

    3379 Ventris, “womb.”

    will I set upon thy throne.”3380

    3380


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.i Pg 29
    Isa. lv. 3.

    in order that He might show that that covenant was to run its course in Christ. That He was of the family of David, according to the genealogy of Mary,3504

    3504 Secundum Mariæ censum. See Kitto’s Cyclopædia of Biblical Literature (third edition), in the article “Genealogy of Jesus Christ,” where the translator of this work has largely given reasons for believing that St. Luke in his genealogy, (chap. iii.) has traced the descent of the Virgin Mary. To the authorities there given may be added this passage of Tertullian, and a fuller one, Adversus Judæos, ix., towards the end. [p. 164, supra.]

    He declared in a figurative way even by the rod which was to proceed out of the stem of Jesse.3505

    3505


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 9

    VERSE 	(29) - 

    :22; 10:7,14-17; 21:16,17,27; 22:5-30 Ps 73:13 Jer 2:35


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    God Rules.NET