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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Job 9:17


    CHAPTERS: Job 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Job 9:17

    μη 3361 γνοφω 1105 με 3165 εκτριψη πολλα 4183 δε 1161 μου 3450 τα 3588 συντριμματα πεποιηκεν 4160 5758 δια 1223 2203 κενης 2756

    Douay Rheims Bible

    For he shall crush me in a whirlwind, and multiply my wounds even without cause.

    King James Bible - Job 9:17

    For he breaketh me with a tempest, and multiplieth my wounds without cause.

    World English Bible

    For he breaks me with a storm, and multiplies my wounds without cause.

    Early Church Father Links

    Npnf-105 xiii.xxx Pg 3

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Job 9:17

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.iv Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.viii.lviii Pg 3
    Isa. xxxv. 10.

    Well, there is nothing eternal until after the resurrection. “And sorrow and sighing,” continues he, “shall flee away.”7729

    7729


    Anf-03 v.viii.lviii Pg 4
    Ver. 10.

    The angel echoes the same to John: “And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes;”7730

    7730


    Anf-01 vi.ii.x Pg 11
    Ps. i. 1.

    even as the fishes [referred to] go in darkness to the depths [of the sea]; “and hath not stood in the way of sinners,” even as those who profess to fear the Lord, but go astray like swine; “and hath not sat in the seat of scorners,”1585

    1585 Literally, “of the pestilent.”

    even as those birds that lie in wait for prey. Take a full and firm grasp of this spiritual1586


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xi Pg 95.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xv Pg 19.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 21.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 iv.v.iii Pg 4
    Ps. i. 1. [Kaye’s censure of this use of the text, (p. 366) seems to me gratuitous.]

    Though he seems to have predicted beforehand of that just man, that he took no part in the meetings and deliberations of the Jews, taking counsel about the slaying of our Lord, yet divine Scripture has ever far-reaching applications: after the immediate sense has been exhausted, in all directions it fortifies the practice of the religious life, so that here also you have an utterance which is not far from a plain interdicting of the shows. If he called those few Jews an assembly of the wicked, how much more will he so designate so vast a gathering of heathens! Are the heathens less impious, less sinners, less enemies of Christ, than the Jews were then? And see, too, how other things agree. For at the shows they also stand in the way. For they call the spaces between the seats going round the amphitheatre, and the passages which separate the people running down, ways. The place in the curve where the matrons sit is called a chair. Therefore, on the contrary, it holds, unblessed is he who has entered any council of wicked men, and has stood in any way of sinners, and has sat in any chair of scorners. We may understand a thing as spoken generally, even when it requires a certain special interpretation to be given to it. For some things spoken with a special reference contain in them general truth. When God admonishes the Israelites of their duty, or sharply reproves them, He has surely a reference to all men; when He threatens destruction to Egypt and Ethiopia, He surely pre-condemns every sinning nation, whatever. If, reasoning from species to genus, every nation that sins against them is an Egypt and Ethiopia; so also, reasoning from genus to species, with reference to the origin of shows, every show is an assembly of the wicked.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1.

    Where then?  “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity;”2934

    2934


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 46
    Ps. i. 1.



    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxvi Pg 5
    Ps. i. 3.

    Again, the righteous is said to flourish like the palm-tree. God appeared from a tree to Abraham, as it is written, near the oak in Mamre. The people found seventy willows and twelve springs after crossing the Jordan.2290

    2290


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 11
    Ps. i. 3–6.

    Mark how He has described at once both the water and the cross. For these words imply, Blessed are they who, placing their trust in the cross, have gone down into the water; for, says He, they shall receive their reward in due time: then He declares, I will recompense them. But now He saith,1601

    1601 Cod. Sin. has, “what meaneth?”

    “Their leaves shall not fade.” This meaneth, that every word which proceedeth out of your mouth in faith and love shall tend to bring conversion and hope to many. Again, another prophet saith, “And the land of Jacob shall be extolled above every land.”1602

    1602


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 19.1


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 17
    Ps. i. 3.

    “He that hath clean hands and a pure heart, who hath not taken God’s name in vain, nor sworn deceitfully to his neighbour, he shall receive blessing from the Lord, and mercy from the God of his salvation.”2937

    2937


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-01 v.ii.ix Pg 10
    Ps. cxix. 1.

    Now the way is unerring, namely, Jesus Christ. For, says He, “I am the way and the life.”550

    550


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xiii Pg 2
    Jer. ix. 23, 24; 1 Cor. i. 31; 2 Cor. x. 17.

    ), being especially mindful of the words of the Lord Jesus which He spake, teaching us meekness and long-suffering. For thus He spoke: “Be ye merciful, that ye may obtain mercy; forgive, that it may be forgiven to you; as ye do, so shall it be done unto you; as ye judge, so shall ye be judged; as ye are kind, so shall kindness be shown to you; with what measure ye mete, with the same it shall be measured to you.”56

    56


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 16
    Jer. ix. 24.

    He adds, “For in these things I delight, says the Lord,” but not in sacrifices, nor in holocausts, nor in oblations. For the people did not receive these precepts as of primary importance (principaliter), but as secondary, and for the reason already alleged, as Isaiah again says: “Thou hast not [brought to] Me the sheep of thy holocaust, nor in thy sacrifices hast thou glorified Me: thou hast not served Me in sacrifices, nor in [the matter of] frankincense hast thou done anything laboriously; neither hast thou bought for Me incense with money, nor have I desired the fat of thy sacrifices; but thou hast stood before Me in thy sins and in thine iniquities.”4020

    4020


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xi Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 36
    Jer. ix. 23, 24.

    Similarly against the daughters of Sion does He inveigh by Isaiah, when they were haughty through their pomp and the abundance of their riches,4016

    4016


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.v Pg 42
    By Jeremiah, chap. ix. 23, 24.

    Unless, forsooth, the Creator enjoined us to glory in the god of Marcion.


    ecf19Oz104z74; 139:10-12


    Anf-01 viii.i Pg 6
    He quotes Plato’s reference, e.g., to the X.; but the Orientals delighted in such conceits. Compare the Hebrew critics on the ה (in Gen. i. 4), on which see Nordheimer, Gram., vol. i. p. 7, New York, 1838.

    If Plato had left us nothing but the Timæus, a Renan would doubtless have reproached him as of feeble intellectual power. So a dancing-master might criticise the movements of an athlete, or the writhings of St. Sebastian shot with arrows. The practical wisdom of Justin using the rhetoric of his times, and discomfiting false philosophy with its own weapons, is not appreciated by the fastidious Parisian. But the manly and heroic pleadings of the man, for a despised people with whom he had boldly identified himself; the intrepidity with which he defends them before despots, whose mere caprice might punish him with death; above all, the undaunted spirit with which he exposes the shame and absurdity of their inveterate superstition and reproaches the memory of Hadrian whom Antoninus had deified, as he had deified Antinous of loathsome history,—these are characteristics which every instinct of the unvitiated soul delights to honour. Justin cannot be refuted by a sneer.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xli Pg 3
    Isa. xlv. 7.

    thus making peace and friendship with those who repent and turn to Him, and bringing [them to] unity, but preparing for the impenitent, those who shun the light, eternal fire and outer darkness, which are evils indeed to those persons who fall into them.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.ii Pg 7
    Isa. xlv. 7.

    inasmuch as he had already concluded from other arguments, which are satisfactory to every perverted mind, that God is the author of evil, so he now applied to the Creator the figure of the corrupt tree bringing forth evil fruit, that is, moral evil,2353

    2353 Mala.

    and then presumed that there ought to be another god, after the analogy of the good tree producing its good fruit.  Accordingly, finding in Christ a different disposition, as it were—one of a simple and pure benevolence2354

    2354 [This purely good or goodish divinity is an idea of the Stoics. De Præscript. chap. 7.]

    —differing from the Creator, he readily argued that in his Christ had been revealed a new and strange2355

    2355 Hospitam.

    divinity; and then with a little leaven he leavened the whole lump of the faith, flavouring it with the acidity of his own heresy.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xvi Pg 8
    “I make peace, and create evil,” Isa. xlv. 7.

    And verily, if the invisible creatures are greater than the visible, which are in their own sphere great, so also is it fitting that the greater should be His to whom the great belong; because neither the great, nor indeed the greater, can be suitable property for one who seems to possess not even the smallest things.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxiv Pg 16
    Isa. xlv. 7.

    and, “I frame evil against you;”3002

    3002


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xiv Pg 4
    See Isa. xlv. 7.

    —so that from these very (contrasts of His providence) I may get an answer to the heretics. Behold, they say, how He acknowledges Himself to be the creator of evil in the passage, “It is I who create evil.” They take a word whose one form reduces to confusion and ambiguity two kinds of evils (because both sins and punishments are called evils), and will have Him in every passage to be understood as the creator of all evil things, in order that He may be designated the author of evil. We, on the contrary, distinguish between the two meanings of the word in question, and, by separating evils of sin from penal evils, mala culpæ from mala pœnæ, confine to each of the two classes its own author,—the devil as the author of the sinful evils (culpæ), and God as the creator of penal evils (pœnæ); so that the one class shall be accounted as morally bad, and the other be classed as the operations of justice passing penal sentences against the evils of sin.  Of the latter class of evils which are compatible with justice, God is therefore avowedly the creator. They are, no doubt, evil to those by whom they are endured, but still on their own account good, as being just and defensive of good and hostile to sin. In this respect they are, moreover, worthy of God. Else prove them to be unjust, in order to show them deserving of a place in the sinful class, that is to say, evils of injustice; because if they turn out to belong to justice, they will be no longer evil things, but good—evil only to the bad, by whom even directly good things are condemned as evil. In this case, you must decide that man, although the wilful contemner of the divine law, unjustly bore the doom which he would like to have escaped; that the wickedness of those days was unjustly smitten by the deluge, afterwards by the fire (of Sodom); that Egypt, although most depraved and superstitious, and, worse still, the harasser of its guest-population,2869

    2869 Hospitis populi conflictatricem.

    was unjustly stricken with the chastisement of its ten plagues. God hardens the heart of Pharaoh. He deserved, however, to be influenced2870

    2870 Subministrari. In Apol. ii., the verb ministrare is used to indicate Satan’s power in influencing men. [The translator here corrects his own word seduced and I have substituted his better word influenced. The Lord gave him over to Satan’s influence.]

    to his destruction, who had already denied God, already in his pride so often rejected His ambassadors, accumulated heavy burdens on His people, and (to sum up all) as an Egyptian, had long been guilty before God of Gentile idolatry, worshipping the ibis and the crocodile in preference to the living God. Even His own people did God visit in their ingratitude.2871

    2871


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.i Pg 35
    Isa. xlv. 7.

    from which you are used even to censure Him with the imputation of fickleness and inconstancy, as if He forbade what He commanded, and commanded what He forbade. Why, then, have you not reckoned up the Antitheses also which occur in the natural works of the Creator, who is for ever contrary to Himself? You have not been able, unless I am misinformed, to recognise the fact,3510

    3510 Recogitare.

    that the world, at all events,3511

    3511 Saltim.

    even amongst your people of Pontus, is made up of a diversity of elements which are hostile to one another.3512

    3512 Æmularum invicem.

    It was therefore your bounden duty first to have determined that the god of the light was one being, and the god of darkness was another, in such wise that you might have been able to have distinctly asserted one of them to be the god of the law and the other the god of the gospel. It is, however, the settled conviction already3513

    3513 Præjudicatum est.

    of my mind from manifest proofs, that, as His works and plans3514

    3514 In the external world.

    exist in the way of Antitheses, so also by the same rule exist the mysteries of His religion.3515

    3515 Sacramenta.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 7
    Isa. xlv. 7.

    Of the wind6461

    6461 92:10 112:9


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 9

    VERSE 	(17) - 

    Job 16:14 Ps 29:5; 42:7; 83:15 Isa 28:17 Jer 23:19 Eze 13:13


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