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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Psalms 29:8


    CHAPTERS: Psalms 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 148, 149, 150     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB


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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Psalms 28:9

    φωνη 5456 κυριου 2962 καταρτιζομενου ελαφους και 2532 αποκαλυψει 601 5692 δρυμους και 2532 εν 1722 1520 τω 3588 ναω 3485 αυτου 847 πας 3956 τις 5100 5101 λεγει 3004 5719 δοξαν 1391

    Douay Rheims Bible

    The
    voice of the Lord prepareth the stags: and he will discover the thick woods: and in his temple all shall speak his glory.

    King James Bible - Psalms 29:9

    The
    voice of the LORD maketh the hinds to calve, and discovereth the forests: and in his temple doth every one speak of his glory.

    World English Bible

    Yahweh's
    voice makes the deer calve, and strips the forests bare. In his temple everything says, "Glory!"

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-07 ix.iii.vii Pg 8, Anf-07 ix.ix.iv Pg 45, Npnf-108 ii.XXVIII Pg 1, Npnf-108 ii.XXVIII Pg 17, Npnf-113 iii.iv.vii Pg 16, Npnf-208 vi.ii.iii Pg 14, Npnf-208 vi.ii.iii Pg 8

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Psalms 28:9

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 15


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iv Pg 3
    Ps. cii. 25–28. The cause of the difference in the numbering of the Psalms is that the Septuagint embraces in one psalm—the ninth—the two which form the ninth and tenth in the Hebrew text.

    pointing out plainly what things they are that pass away, and who it is that doth endure for ever—God, together with His servants. And in like manner Esaias says: “Lift up your eyes to the heavens, and look upon the earth beneath; for the heaven has been set together as smoke, and the earth shall wax old like a garment, and they who dwell therein shall die in like manner. But my salvation shall be for ever, and my righteousness shall not pass away.”3832

    3832


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 5
    There is, if the text be genuine, some confusion here.  Melchizedek does not appear to have been, in any sense, “subsequent” to Abraham, for he probably was senior to him; and, moreover, Abraham does not appear to have been “already circumcised” carnally when Melchizedek met him. Comp. Gen. xiv. with Gen. xvii.

    “But again,” (you say) “the son of Moses would upon one occasion have been choked by an angel, if Zipporah,1165

    1165


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxii Pg 5
    Gen. xxii. 17, Gen. xxviii. 4.

    All these, therefore, were highly honoured, and made great, not for their own sake, or for their own works, or for the righteousness which they wrought, but through the operation of His will. And we, too, being called by His will in Christ Jesus, are not justified by ourselves, nor by our own wisdom, or understanding, or godliness, or works which we have wrought in holiness of heart; but by that faith through which, from the beginning, Almighty God has justified all men; to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xx Pg 25
    Gen. xxii. 17.

    Therefore “one star differeth from another star in glory.”6119

    6119


    Anf-03 iv.ix.i Pg 11
    See Gen. xxii. 18; and comp. Gal. iii. 16, and the reference in both places.

    and that1130

    1130


    Anf-01 vi.ii.vi Pg 34
    Gen. i. 28.

    Who then is able to govern the beasts, or the fishes, or the fowls of heaven? For we ought to perceive that to govern implies authority, so that one should command and rule. If, therefore, this does not exist at present, yet still He has promised it to us. When? When we ourselves also have been made perfect [so as] to become heirs of the covenant of the Lord.1526

    1526 These are specimens of the “Gnosis,” or faculty of bringing out the hidden spiritual meaning of Scripture referred to before. Many more such interpretations follow.



    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxiii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 28.

    We see,138

    138 Or, “let us consider.”

    then, how all righteous men have been adorned with good works, and how the Lord Himself, adorning Himself with His works, rejoiced. Having therefore such an example, let us without delay accede to His will, and let us work the work of righteousness with our whole strength.


    Anf-01 vi.ii.vi Pg 21
    Gen. i. 28.

    These things [were spoken] to the Son. Again, I will show thee how, in respect to us,1513

    1513 Cod. Sin. inserts, “the Lord says.”

    He has accomplished a second fashioning in these last days. The Lord says, “Behold, I will make1514

    1514 Cod. Sin. has “I make.”

    the last like the first.”1515

    1515


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 26; 28.

    And that you may not change the [force of the] words just quoted, and repeat what your teachers assert,—either that God said to Himself, ‘Let Us make,’ just as we, when about to do something, oftentimes say to ourselves, ‘Let us make;’ or that God spoke to the elements, to wit, the earth and other similar substances of which we believe man was formed, ‘Let Us make,’—I shall quote again the words narrated by Moses himself, from which we can indisputably learn that [God] conversed with some one who was numerically distinct from Himself, and also a rational Being. These are the words: ‘And God said, Behold, Adam has become as one of us, to know good and evil.’2175

    2175


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 28.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xxiii Pg 7.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 53.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 232.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 270.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxix Pg 10
    Gen. i. 28.

    but also, “Thou shalt not commit adultery,” and, “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s wife;”2681

    2681


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xxvii Pg 6
    Gen. i. 28.

    Excess, however, has He cursed, in adulteries, and wantonness, and chambering.1698

    1698 Lupanaria.

    Well, now, in this usual function of the sexes which brings together the male and the female in their common intercourse, we know that both the soul and the flesh discharge a duty together: the soul supplies desire, the flesh contributes the gratification of it; the soul furnishes the instigation, the flesh affords the realization. The entire man being excited by the one effort of both natures, his seminal substance is discharged, deriving its fluidity from the body, and its warmth from the soul. Now if the soul in Greek is a word which is synonymous with cold,1699

    1699 See above, c. xxv. p. 206.

    how does it come to pass that the body grows cold after the soul has quitted it? Indeed (if I run the risk of offending modesty even, in my desire to prove the truth), I cannot help asking, whether we do not, in that very heat of extreme gratification when the generative fluid is ejected, feel that somewhat of our soul has gone from us? And do we not experience a faintness and prostration along with a dimness of sight?  This, then, must be the soul-producing seed, which arises at once from the out-drip of the soul, just as that fluid is the body-producing seed which proceeds from the drainage of the flesh.  Most true are the examples of the first creation. Adam’s flesh was formed of clay. Now what is clay but an excellent moisture, whence should spring the generating fluid?  From the breath of God first came the soul. But what else is the breath of God than the vapour of the spirit, whence should spring that which we breathe out through the generative fluid? Forasmuch, therefore, as these two different and separate substances, the clay and the breath, combined at the first creation in forming the individual man, they then both amalgamated and mixed their proper seminal rudiments in one, and ever afterwards communicated to the human race the normal mode of its propagation, so that even now the two substances, although diverse from each other, flow forth simultaneously in a united channel; and finding their way together into their appointed seed-plot, they fertilize with their combined vigour the human fruit out of their respective natures.  And inherent in this human product is his own seed, according to the process which has been ordained for every creature endowed with the functions of generation. Accordingly from the one (primeval) man comes the entire outflow and redundance of men’s soulsnature proving herself true to the commandment of God, “Be fruitful, and multiply.”1700

    1700


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xxvii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 28.

    For in the very preamble of this one production, “Let us make man,”1701

    1701


    Anf-03 v.v.i Pg 15
    Quoting Gen. i. 28, “Be fruitful and multiply” (Rigalt.).

    and yet despises it in respect of his art.6137

    6137 Disregarding the law when it forbids the representation of idols.  (Rigalt.).

    He falsifies by a twofold process—with his cautery and his pen.6138

    6138 Et cauterio et stilo. The former instrument was used by the encaustic painters for burning in the wax colours into the ground of their pictures (Westropp’s Handbook of Archæology, p. 219).  Tertullian charges Hermogenes with using his encaustic art to the injury of the scriptures, by practically violating their precepts in his artistic works; and with using his pen (stilus) in corrupting the doctrine thereof by his heresy.

    He is a thorough adulterer, both doctrinally and carnally, since he is rank indeed with the contagion of your marriage-hacks,6139

    6139 By the nubentium contagium, Tertullian, in his Montanist rigour, censures those who married more than once.

    and has also failed in cleaving to the rule of faith as much as the apostle’s own Hermogenes.6140

    6140


    Anf-03 v.viii.xlv Pg 5
    Gen. i. 28.

    the flesh and the soul have had a simultaneous birth, without any calculable difference in time; so that the two have been even generated together in the womb, as we have shown in our Treatise on the Soul.7583

    7583 See ch. xxvii.

    Contemporaneous in the womb, they are also temporally identical in their birth. The two are no doubt produced by human parents7584

    7584 We treat “homines” as a nominative, after Oehler.

    of two substances, but not at two different periods; rather they are so entirely one, that neither is before the other in point of time. It is more correct (to say), that we are either entirely the old man or entirely the new, for we cannot tell how we can possibly be anything else. But the apostle mentions a very clear mark of the old man. For “put off,” says he, “concerning the former conversation, the old man;”7585

    7585


    Anf-03 vi.ii.ii Pg 3
    Or, “while these things continue, those which respect the Lord rejoice in purity along with them—Wisdom,” etc.

    For He hath revealed to us by all the prophets that He needs neither sacrifices, nor burnt-offerings, nor oblations, saying thus, “What is the multitude of your sacrifices unto Me, saith the Lord? I am full of burnt-offerings, and desire not the fat of lambs, and the blood of bulls and goats, not when ye come to appear before Me: for who hath required these things at your hands? Tread no more My courts, not though ye bring with you fine flour. Incense is a vain abomination unto Me, and your new moons and sabbaths I cannot endure.”1458

    1458


    Anf-01 ix.iv.x Pg 2
    Gen. xv. 5.

    and Him who, by His Son Christ Jesus, has called us to the knowledge of Himself, from the worship of stones, so that those who were not a people were made a people, and she beloved who was not beloved3374

    3374


    Anf-01 ix.vi.viii Pg 8
    Gen. xv. 5.

    as John the Baptist says: “For God is able from these stones to raise up children unto Abraham.”3873

    3873


    Anf-01 ii.ii.x Pg 5
    Gen. xv. 5, 6; Rom. iv. 3.

    On account of his faith and hospitality, a son was given him in his old age; and in the exercise of obedience, he offered him as a sacrifice to God on one of the mountains which He showed him.49

    49 138:4,5


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxx Pg 2
    Deut. xxxii. 43.

    and I added what follows of the passage: “ ‘Rejoice, O ye nations, with His people, and let all the angels of God be strengthened in Him: for the blood of His sons He avenges, and will avenge, and will recompense His enemies with vengeance, and will recompense those that hate Him; and the Lord will purify the land of His people.’ And by these words He declares that we, the nations, rejoice with His people, —to wit, Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and the prophets, and, in short, all of that people who are well-pleasing to God, according to what has been already agreed on between us. But we will not receive it of all your nation; since we know from Isaiah2459

    2459 Isa. lxvi. 24.

    that the members of those who have transgressed shall be consumed by the worm and unquenchable fire, remaining immortal; so that they become a spectacle to all flesh. <index subject1="Israel applied to Chirst" title="265" id="viii.iv.cxxx-p3.2"/>But in addition to these, I wish, sirs,” said I, “to add some other passages from the very words of Moses, from which you may understand that God has from of old dispersed all men according to their kindreds and tongues; and out of all kindreds has taken to Himself your kindred, a useless, disobedient, and faithless generation; and has shown that those who were selected out of every nation have obeyed His will through Christ,—whom He calls also Jacob, and names Israel, —and these, then, as I mentioned fully previously, must be Jacob and Israel. For when He says, ‘Rejoice, O ye nations, with His people,’ He allots the same inheritance to them, and does not call them by the same name;2460

    2460 The reading is, “and calls them by the same name.” But the whole argument shows that the Jews and Gentiles are distinguished by name. [But that Gentiles are also called (Israel) by the same name is the point here.]

    but when He says that they as Gentiles rejoice with His people, He calls them Gentiles to reproach you. For even as you provoked Him to anger by your idolatry, so also He has deemed those who were idolaters worthy of knowing His will, and of inheriting His inheritance.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.x Pg 5
    Isa. xlii. 10, quoted from memory.

    And Jeremiah says: “Behold, I will make a new covenant, not as I made with your fathers”3903

    3903


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 22.1


    Anf-01 viii.ii.liii Pg 2
    Isa. liv. 1.

    For all the Gentiles were “desolate” of the true God, serving the works of their hands; but the Jews and Samaritans, having the word of God delivered to them by the prophets, and always expecting the Christ, did not recognise Him when He came, except some few, of whom the Spirit of prophecy by Isaiah had predicted that they should be saved. He spoke as from their person: “Except the Lord had left us a seed, we should have been as Sodom and Gomorrah.”1880

    1880


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xi Pg 15
    Isa. liv. 1; Gal. iv. 27.

    For in reference to these points, and others of a like nature, the apostle exclaims: “Oh! the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God; how unsearchable are His judgments, and His ways past finding out!”2798

    2798


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.vi Pg 10.1


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxv Pg 21
    Isa. liv. 11–14.

    And yet again does he say the same thing: “Behold, I make Jerusalem a rejoicing, and my people [a joy]; for the voice of weeping shall be no more heard in her, nor the voice of crying. Also there shall not be there any immature [one], nor an old man who does not fulfil his time: for the youth shall be of a hundred years; and the sinner shall die a hundred years old, yet shall be accursed. And they shall build houses, and inhabit them themselves; and shall plant vineyards, and eat the fruit of them themselves, and shall drink wine. And they shall not build, and others inhabit; neither shall they prepare the vineyard, and others eat. For as the days of the tree of life shall be the days of the people in thee; for the works of their hands shall endure.”4764

    4764


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 157


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 51
    Comp. Num. xii. 5–8.

    For God the Father none ever saw, and lived.1295

    1295 148:1-14 150:6


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 5
    Deut. xxxi. 16–18.

    ‘This people [shall go a whoring after other gods], and shall forsake Me, and shall break my covenant which I made with them in that day; and I will forsake them, and will turn away My face from them; and they shall be devoured,2228

    2228 Literally, “for food.”

    and many evils and afflictions shall find them out; and they shall say in that day, Because the Lord my God is not amongst us, these misfortunes have found us out. And I shall certainly turn away My face from them in that day, on account of all the evils which they have committed, in that they have turned to other gods.’2229

    2229 The first conference seems to have ended hereabout. [It occupied two days. But the student must consult the learned note of Kaye (Justin Martyr, p. 20. Rivingtons, London. 1853).]



    Anf-03 iv.iv.xx Pg 8
    Because Scripture calls idolsvanities” and “vain things.” See 2 Kings xvii. 15, Ps. xxiv. 4, Isa. lix. 4, Deut. xxxii. 21, etc.

    Whoever, therefore, honours an idol with the name of God, has fallen into idolatry.  But if I speak of them as gods, something must be added to make it appear that I do not call them gods. For even the Scripture names “gods,” but adds “their,” viz. “of the nations:” just as David does when he had named “gods,” where he says, “But the gods of the nations are demons.”328

    328


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 97
    Jer. xxxi. 31, 32.

    with men, not such as that which He made with the fathers at Mount Horeb, and would give to men a new heart and a new spirit;4335

    4335


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xi Pg 4
    Jer. xxxi. 31, 32.

    ). If, therefore, God proclaimed a new covenant which was to be instituted, and this for a light of the nations, we see and are persuaded that men approach God, leaving their idols and other unrighteousness, through the name of Him who was crucified, Jesus Christ, and abide by their confession even unto death, and maintain piety. Moreover, by the works and by the attendant miracles, it is possible for all to understand that He is the new law, and the new covenant, and the expectation of those who out of every people wait for the good things of God. For the true spiritual Israel, and descendants of Judah, Jacob, Isaac, and Abraham (who in uncircumcision was approved of and blessed by God on account of his faith, and called the father of many nations), are we who have been led to God through this crucified Christ, as shall be demonstrated while we proceed.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.v Pg 9.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 13
    Jer. xxxi. 31, 32 (in LXX. ibid. xxxviii. 31, 32); comp. Heb. viii. 8–13.

    Whence we understand that the coming cessation of the former circumcision then given, and the coming procession of a new law (not such as He had already given to the fathers), are announced: just as Isaiah foretold, saying that in the last days the mount of the Lord and the house of God were to be manifest above the tops of the mounts: “And it shall be exalted,” he says, “above the hills; and there shall come over it all nations; and many shall walk, and say, Come, ascend we unto the mount of the Lord, and unto the house of the God of Jacob,”1173

    1173


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.i Pg 28
    Jer. xxxi. 31, 32, with slight change.

    He thus shows that the ancient covenant is temporary only, when He indicates its change; also when He promises that it shall be followed by an eternal one. For by Isaiah He says: “Hear me, and ye shall live; and I will make an everlasting covenant with you,” adding “the sure mercies of David,”3503

    3503


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xx Pg 10
    This quotation, however, is from Jer. xxxi. 32.

    In like manner by Jeremiah: Make to yourselves a new covenant, “circumcise yourselves to the Lord, and take away the foreskins of your heart.”2561

    2561


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xv Pg 7
    Ps. xii. 3–5.



    Anf-01 v.iii.ix Pg 14
    Ps. vi., Ps. xii. (inscrip.). [N.B.—The reference is to the title of these two psalms, as rendered by the LXX. Εἰς τὸ τέλος ὑπὲρ τῆς ὀγδόης.]

    on which our life both sprang up again, and the victory over death was obtained in Christ, whom the children of perdition, the enemies of the Saviour, deny, “whose god is their belly, who mind earthly things,”692

    692


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.v Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.i Pg 10.1


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lix Pg 3
    Ex. ii. 23.

    and so on until, ‘Go and gather the elders of Israel, and thou shalt say unto them, The Lord God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath appeared to me, saying, I am surely beholding you, and the things which have befallen you in Egypt.’ ”2163

    2163


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xiv Pg 11
    Isa. xlii. 6, 7.

    Ye perceive,1651

    1651 Cod. Sin. has, “we know.”

    then, whence we have been redeemed. And again, the prophet says, “Behold, I have appointed Thee as a light to the nations, that Thou mightest be for salvation even to the ends of the earth, saith the Lord God that redeemeth thee.”1652

    1652


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxvi Pg 2
    Isa. xlii. 6, 7.

    And again: ‘Lift up a standard2014

    2014 συσσεισμόν, “a shaking,” is the original reading; but LXX has σύσσημον, a standard or signal, and this most edd. adopt.

    for the people; for, lo, the Lord has made it heard unto the end of the earth. Say ye to the daughters of Zion, Behold, thy Saviour has come; having His reward, and His work before His face: and He shall call it a holy nation, redeemed by the Lord. And thou shalt be called a city sought out, and not forsaken. Who is this that cometh from Edom? in red garments from Bosor? This that is beautiful in apparel, going up with great strength? I speak righteousness, and the judgment of salvation. Why are Thy garments red, and Thine apparel as from the trodden wine-press? Thou art full of the trodden grape. I have trodden the wine-press all alone, and of the people there is no man with Me; and I have trampled them in fury, and crushed them to the ground, and spilled their blood on the earth. For the day of retribution has come upon them, and the year of redemption is present. And I looked, and there was none to help; and I considered, and none assisted: and My arm delivered; and My fury came on them, and I trampled them in My fury, and spilled their blood on the earth.’ ”2015

    2015


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xii Pg 5
    Isa. xlii. 6, 7, comp. lxi. 1; Luke iv. 14–18.

    —of ignorance, to wit. And if these blessings accrue through Christ, they will not have been prophesied of another than Him through whom we consider them to have been accomplished.1382

    1382


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xx Pg 7
    Isa. xlii. 6, 7.

    If these things are accomplished through Christ, they would not have been designed in prophecy for any other than Him through whom they have their accomplishment.  In another passage He also says:  “Behold, I have set Him as a testimony to the nations, a prince and commander to the nations; nations which know Thee not shall invoke Thee, and peoples shall run together unto Thee.”3376

    3376


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xvii Pg 18
    Isa. l. 10.

    And likewise as a healer: “For,” says he, “He hath taken away our infirmities, and carried our sorrows.”3342

    3342


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 34
    Isa. l. 10, according to the Septuagint.

    When therefore He here presents Him with the words, “This is my (beloved) Son,” this clause is of course understood, “whom I have promised.” For if He once promised, and then afterwards says, “This is He,” it is suitable conduct for one who accomplishes His purpose4351

    4351 Ejus est exhibentis.

    that He should utter His voice in proof of the promise which He had formerly made; but unsuitable in one who is amenable to the retort, Can you, indeed, have a right to say, “This is my son,” concerning whom you have given us no previous information,4352

    4352 Non præmisisti. Oehler suggests promisisti, “have given us no promise.”

    any more than you have favoured us with a revelation about your own prior existence? “Hear ye Him,” therefore, whom from the beginning (the Creator) had declared entitled to be heard in the name of a prophet, since it was as a prophet that He had to be regarded by the people. “A prophet,” says Moses, “shall the Lord your God raise up unto you, of your sons” (that is, of course, after a carnal descent4353

    4353 Censum: Some read sensum, “sense.”

    ); “unto Him shall ye hearken, as unto me.”4354

    4354


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 41
    Isa. l. 10.

    This voice the Father was going Himself to recommend. For, says he,4358

    4358


    Anf-01 vi.ii.iii Pg 4
    Isa. lviii. 6–10.

    To this end, therefore, brethren, He is long-suffering, foreseeing how the people whom He has prepared shall with guilelessness believe in His Beloved. For He revealed all these things to us beforehand, that we should not rush forward as rash acceptors of their laws.1467

    1467 The Greek is here unintelligible: the Latin has, “that we should not rush on, as if proselytes to their law.”



    Anf-03 v.viii.xxxi Pg 3
    Mal. iv. 2, 3.

    And again, (Isaiah says): “Your heart shall rejoice, and your bones shall spring up like the grass,”7491

    7491


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxiii Pg 6
    Isa. v. 12.

    But, according to the language [used by the prophet], they ought to be combined, and the day of retribution to follow the [acceptable] year. For the words are, “to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord, and the day of retribution.” This present time, therefore, in which men are called and saved by the Lord, is properly understood to be denoted by “the acceptable year of the Lord;” and there follows on this “the day of retribution,” that is, the judgment. And the time thus referred to is not called “a year” only, but is also named “a day” both by the prophet and by Paul, of whom the apostle, calling to mind the Scripture, says in the Epistle addressed to the Romans, “As it is written, for thy sake we are killed all the day long, we are counted as sheep for the slaughter.”3125

    3125


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iii Pg 15
    Isa. v. 12.

    Lest, therefore, we should incur the same punishment as these men, the Lord reveals [to us] their end; showing at the same time, that if they obeyed Moses and the prophets, they would believe in Him whom these had preached, the Son of God, who rose from the dead, and bestows life upon us; and He shows that all are from one essence, that is, Abraham, and Moses, and the prophets, and also the Lord Himself, who rose from the dead, in whom many believe who are of the circumcision, who do also hear Moses and the prophets announcing the coming of the Son of God. But those who scoff [at the truth] assert that these men were from another essence, and they do not know the first-begotten from the dead; understanding Christ as a distinct being, who continued as if He were impassible, and Jesus, who suffered, as being altogether separate [from Him].


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xviii Pg 27
    Isa. v. 11, 12.

    Now, when I find to what God belong these precepts, whether in their germ or their development, I have no difficulty in knowing to whom the apostle also belongs.  But he declares that “wives ought to be in subjection to their husbands:”6028

    6028


    Anf-03 iv.vi.ix Pg 4
    Isa. v. 12.

    would have added “with crowns,” if this practice had ever had place in the things of God.


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xx Pg 9
    Ps. xcvi. 5. The LXX. in whose version ed. Tisch. it is Ps. xcv. read δαιμόνια, like Tertullian. Our version has “idols.”

    But this has been laid by me rather as a foundation for ensuing observations.  However, it is a defect of custom to say, “By Hercules, So help me the god of faith;”329

    329 Mehercule. Medius Fidius. I have given the rendering of the latter, which seems preferred by Paley (Ov. Fast. vi. 213, note), who considers it = me dius (i.e., Deus) fidius juvet.  Smith (Lat. Dict. s.v.) agrees with him, and explains it, me deus fidius servet. White and Riddle (s.v.) take the me (which appears to be short) as a “demonstrative” particle or prefix, and explain, “By the God of truth!” “As true as heaven,” “Most certainly.”

    while to the custom is added the ignorance of some, who are ignorant that it is an oath by Hercules. Further, what will an oath be, in the name of gods whom you have forsworn, but a collusion of faith with idolatry? For who does not honour them in whose name he swears?


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xx Pg 9
    Ps. xcvi. 5. The LXX. in whose version ed. Tisch. it is Ps. xcv. read δαιμόνια, like Tertullian. Our version has “idols.”

    But this has been laid by me rather as a foundation for ensuing observations.  However, it is a defect of custom to say, “By Hercules, So help me the god of faith;”329

    329 Mehercule. Medius Fidius. I have given the rendering of the latter, which seems preferred by Paley (Ov. Fast. vi. 213, note), who considers it = me dius (i.e., Deus) fidius juvet.  Smith (Lat. Dict. s.v.) agrees with him, and explains it, me deus fidius servet. White and Riddle (s.v.) take the me (which appears to be short) as a “demonstrative” particle or prefix, and explain, “By the God of truth!” “As true as heaven,” “Most certainly.”

    while to the custom is added the ignorance of some, who are ignorant that it is an oath by Hercules. Further, what will an oath be, in the name of gods whom you have forsworn, but a collusion of faith with idolatry? For who does not honour them in whose name he swears?


    Anf-02 vi.ii.ix Pg 11.1
    1558 Cod. Sin. has, “that we might hear the word, and not only believe,” plainly a corrupt text.

    For He declared that circumcision was not of the flesh, but they transgressed because an evil angel deluded them.1559

    1559 Cod. Sin., at first hand, has “slew them,” but is corrected as above.

    He saith to them, “These things saith the Lord your God”—(here1560


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xx Pg 9
    Ps. xcvi. 5. The LXX. in whose version ed. Tisch. it is Ps. xcv. read δαιμόνια, like Tertullian. Our version has “idols.”

    But this has been laid by me rather as a foundation for ensuing observations.  However, it is a defect of custom to say, “By Hercules, So help me the god of faith;”329

    329 Mehercule. Medius Fidius. I have given the rendering of the latter, which seems preferred by Paley (Ov. Fast. vi. 213, note), who considers it = me dius (i.e., Deus) fidius juvet.  Smith (Lat. Dict. s.v.) agrees with him, and explains it, me deus fidius servet. White and Riddle (s.v.) take the me (which appears to be short) as a “demonstrative” particle or prefix, and explain, “By the God of truth!” “As true as heaven,” “Most certainly.”

    while to the custom is added the ignorance of some, who are ignorant that it is an oath by Hercules. Further, what will an oath be, in the name of gods whom you have forsworn, but a collusion of faith with idolatry? For who does not honour them in whose name he swears?


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xii Pg 14
    This evidently refers to 1 Kings xviii. 36, where Elijah invokes God as the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, etc.

    as he does himself confess. John, therefore, having been sent by the founder and maker of this world, how could he testify of that Light, which came down from things unspeakable and invisible? For all the heretics have decided that the Demiurge was ignorant of that Power above him, whose witness and herald John is found to be. Wherefore the Lord said that He deemed him “more than a prophet.”3439

    3439


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 25
    1 Kings xviii. 36.


    Anf-01 ix.iv.ix Pg 11
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    But that He did Himself make all things freely, and as He pleased, again David says, “But our God is in the heavens above, and in the earth; He hath made all things whatsoever He pleased.”3372

    3372


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxiii Pg 3
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    And again, “All things were made by Him, and without Him was nothing made.”2931

    2931


    Anf-02 iv.ii.i.vii Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.iv Pg 39.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.v.xlv Pg 5
    Spiritu Ipsius: “by His Spirit.” See Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    He is the Lord’s right hand,6596

    6596


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 14
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    —that is to say, by the Spirit (or Divine Nature) which was in the Word: thus is it evident that it is one and the same power which is in one place described under the name of Wisdom, and in another passage under the appellation of the Word, which was initiated for the works of God7835

    7835


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 9
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    Now this Word, the Power of God and the Wisdom of God, must be the very Son of God.  So that, if (He did) all things by the Son, He must have stretched out the heavens by the Son, and so not have stretched them out alone, except in the sense in which He is “alone” (and apart) from all other gods. Accordingly He says, concerning the Son, immediately afterwards: “Who else is it that frustrateth the tokens of the liars, and maketh diviners mad, turning wise men backward, and making their knowledge foolish, and confirming the words7996

    7996


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 14
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    Inasmuch, then, as the heaven was prepared when Wisdom was present in the Word, and since all things were made by the Word, it is quite correct to say that even the Son stretched out the heaven alone, because He alone ministered to the Father’s work. It must also be He who says, “I am the First, and to all futurity I AM.”8001

    8001


    Anf-01 ix.iv.ix Pg 11
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    But that He did Himself make all things freely, and as He pleased, again David says, “But our God is in the heavens above, and in the earth; He hath made all things whatsoever He pleased.”3372

    3372


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxiii Pg 3
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    And again, “All things were made by Him, and without Him was nothing made.”2931

    2931


    Anf-02 iv.ii.i.vii Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.iv Pg 39.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.v.xlv Pg 5
    Spiritu Ipsius: “by His Spirit.” See Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    He is the Lord’s right hand,6596

    6596


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 14
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    —that is to say, by the Spirit (or Divine Nature) which was in the Word: thus is it evident that it is one and the same power which is in one place described under the name of Wisdom, and in another passage under the appellation of the Word, which was initiated for the works of God7835

    7835


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 9
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    Now this Word, the Power of God and the Wisdom of God, must be the very Son of God.  So that, if (He did) all things by the Son, He must have stretched out the heavens by the Son, and so not have stretched them out alone, except in the sense in which He is “alone” (and apart) from all other gods. Accordingly He says, concerning the Son, immediately afterwards: “Who else is it that frustrateth the tokens of the liars, and maketh diviners mad, turning wise men backward, and making their knowledge foolish, and confirming the words7996

    7996


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 14
    Ps. xxxiii. 6.

    Inasmuch, then, as the heaven was prepared when Wisdom was present in the Word, and since all things were made by the Word, it is quite correct to say that even the Son stretched out the heaven alone, because He alone ministered to the Father’s work. It must also be He who says, “I am the First, and to all futurity I AM.”8001

    8001


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 11
    Ps. xxxiii. 9, Ps. cxlviii. 5.

    Whom, therefore, shall we believe as to the creation of the world—these heretics who have been mentioned that prate so foolishly and inconsistently on the subject, or the disciples of the Lord, and Moses, who was both a faithful servant of God and a prophet? He at first narrated the formation of the world in these words: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth,”2996

    2996


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xvi Pg 4.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.ii Pg 14


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 60


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xx Pg 9
    Ps. xcvi. 5. The LXX. in whose version ed. Tisch. it is Ps. xcv. read δαιμόνια, like Tertullian. Our version has “idols.”

    But this has been laid by me rather as a foundation for ensuing observations.  However, it is a defect of custom to say, “By Hercules, So help me the god of faith;”329

    329 Mehercule. Medius Fidius. I have given the rendering of the latter, which seems preferred by Paley (Ov. Fast. vi. 213, note), who considers it = me dius (i.e., Deus) fidius juvet.  Smith (Lat. Dict. s.v.) agrees with him, and explains it, me deus fidius servet. White and Riddle (s.v.) take the me (which appears to be short) as a “demonstrative” particle or prefix, and explain, “By the God of truth!” “As true as heaven,” “Most certainly.”

    while to the custom is added the ignorance of some, who are ignorant that it is an oath by Hercules. Further, what will an oath be, in the name of gods whom you have forsworn, but a collusion of faith with idolatry? For who does not honour them in whose name he swears?


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    and all other things in succession; but neither gods nor angels [had any share in the work].


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxviii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    then the sun, and the moon, and the stars. For having learned this in Egypt, and having been much taken with what Moses had written in the Genesis of the world, he fabled that Vulcan had made in the shield of Achilles a kind of representation of the creation of the world. For he wrote thus:2568

    2568 Iliad, xviii. 483.

    “There he described the earth, the heaven, the sea, The sun that rests not, and the moon full-orb’d; There also, all the stars which round about, As with a radiant frontlet, bind the skies.”


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 2
    Gen. i. 1.

    for, as they maintain, by naming these four,—God, beginning, heaven, and earth,—he set forth their Tetrad. Indicating also its invisible and hidden nature, he said, “Now the earth was invisible and unformed.”2880

    2880


    Anf-02 iii.ii.v Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 17.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.iii Pg 11
    Gen. i. 1.

    and as long as He continued making, one after the other, those things of which He was to be the Lord, it merely mentions God.  “And God said,” “and God made,” “and God saw;”6160

    6160


    Anf-03 v.v.xix Pg 6
    Gen. i. 1.

    just as it would have said, “At last God made the heaven and the earth,” if God had created these after all the rest.  Now, if the beginning is a substance, the end must also be material. No doubt, a substantial thing6320

    6320 Substantivum aliquid.

    may be the beginning of some other thing which may be formed out of it; thus the clay is the beginning of the vessel, and the seed is the beginning of the plant. But when we employ the word beginning in this sense of origin, and not in that of order, we do not omit to mention also the name of that particular thing which we regard as the origin of the other. On the other hand,6321

    6321 De cetero.

    if we were to make such a statement as this, for example, “In the beginning the potter made a basin or a water-jug,” the word beginning will not here indicate a material substance (for I have not mentioned the clay, which is the beginning in this sense, but only the order of the work, meaning that the potter made the basin and the jug first, before anything else—intending afterwards to make the rest. It is, then, to the order of the works that the word beginning has reference, not to the origin of their substances. I might also explain this word beginning in another way, which would not, however, be inapposite.6322

    6322 Non ab re tamen.

    The Greek term for beginning, which is ἀρχή, admits the sense not only of priority of order, but of power as well; whence princes and magistrates are called ἀρχοντες. Therefore in this sense too, beginning may be taken for princely authority and power. It was, indeed, in His transcendent authority and power, that God made the heaven and the earth.


    Anf-03 v.v.xx Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    —“and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  All things were made by Him, and without Him nothing was made.”6333

    6333


    Anf-03 v.v.xxii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 1.

    I revere6345

    6345 Adoro: reverently admire.

    the fulness of His Scripture, in which He manifests to me both the Creator and the creation. In the gospel, moreover, I discover a Minister and Witness of the Creator, even His Word.6346

    6346


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 3
    Gen. i. 1.

    The Scripture, which at its very outset proposes to run through the order thereof tells us as its first information that it was created; it next proceeds to set forth what sort of earth it was.6367

    6367 Qualitatem ejus: unless this means “how He made it,” like the “qualiter fecerit” below.

    In like manner with respect to the heaven, it informs us first of its creation—“In the beginning God made the heaven:”6368

    6368


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    it then goes on to introduce its arrangement; how that God both separated “the water which was below the firmament from that which was above the firmament,”6369

    6369


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 29
    Cum cælo separavit: Gen. i. 1.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    They will have it, moreover, that he spoke of the second Tetrad, the offspring of the first, in this way—by naming an abyss and darkness, in which were also water, and the Spirit moving upon the water. Then, proceeding to mention the Decad, he names light, day, night, the firmament, the evening, the morning, dry land, sea, plants, and, in the tenth place, trees. Thus, by means of these ten names, he indicated the ten Æons. The power of the Duodecad, again, was shadowed forth by him thus:—He names the sun, moon, stars, seasons, years, whales, fishes, reptiles, birds, quadrupeds, wild beasts, and after all these, in the twelfth place, man. Thus they teach that the Triacontad was spoken of through Moses by the Spirit. Moreover, man also, being formed after the image of the power above, had in himself that ability which flows from the one source. This ability was seated in the region of the brain, from which four faculties proceed, after the image of the Tetrad above, and these are called: the first, sight, the second, hearing, the third, smell, and the fourth,2881

    2881 One of the senses was thus capriciously cancelled by these heretics.

    taste. And they say that the Ogdoad is indicated by man in this way: that he possesses two ears, the like number of eyes, also two nostrils, and a twofold taste, namely, of bitter and sweet. Moreover, they teach that the whole man contains the entire image of the Triacontad as follows: In his hands, by means of his fingers, he bears the Decad; and in his whole body the Duodecad, inasmuch as his body is divided into twelve members; for they portion that out, as the body of Truth is divided by them—a point of which we have already spoken.2882

    2882 See above, chap. xiv. 2.

    But the Ogdoad, as being unspeakable and invisible, is understood as hidden in the viscera.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvi Pg 11
    Gen. i. 2.

    Whose kingdom shall I wish to come—his, of whom I never heard as the king of glory; or His, in whose hand are even the hearts of kings? Who shall give me my daily4537

    4537


    Anf-03 v.v.xxiii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    For he resolves6350

    6350 Redigit in.

    the word earth into Matter, because that which is made out of it is the earth.  And to the word was he gives the same direction, as if it pointed to what had always existed unbegotten and unmade. It was without form, moreover, and void, because he will have Matter to have existed shapeless and confused, and without the finish of a maker’s hand.6351

    6351 Inconditam: we have combined the two senses of the word.

    Now these opinions of his I will refute singly; but first I wish to say to him, by way of general answer: We are of opinion that Matter is pointed at in these terms. But yet does the Scripture intimate that, because Matter was in existence before all, anything of like condition6352

    6352 Tale aliquid.

    was even formed out of it? Nothing of the kind. Matter might have had existence, if it so pleased—or rather if Hermogenes so pleased. It might, I say, have existed, and yet God might not have made anything out of it, either as it was unsuitable to Him to have required the aid of anything, or at least because He is not shown to have made anything out of Matter. Its existence must therefore be without a cause, you will say. Oh, no! certainly6353

    6353 Plane: ironical.

    not without cause. For even if the world were not made out of it, yet a heresy has been hatched there from; and a specially impudent one too, because it is not Matter which has produced the heresy, but the heresy has rather made Matter itself.


    Anf-03 v.v.xxv Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    Of course, if I were to ask, to which of the two earths the name earth is best suited,6361

    6361 Quæ cui nomen terræ accommodare debeat. This is literally a double question, asking about the fitness of the name, and to which earth it is best adapted.

    I shall be told that the earth which was made derived the appellation from that of which it was made, on the ground that it is more likely that the offspring should get its name from the original, than the original from the offspring. This being the case, another question presents itself to us, whether it is right and proper that this earth which God made should have derived its name from that out of which He made it? For I find from Hermogenes and the rest of the Materialist heretics,6362

    6362 He means those who have gone wrong on the eternity of matter.

    that while the one earth was indeed “without form, and void,” this one of ours obtained from God in an equal degree6363

    6363 Proinde.

    both form, and beauty, and symmetry; and therefore that the earth which was created was a different thing from that out of which it was created. Now, having become a different thing, it could not possibly have shared with the other in its name, after it had declined from its condition. If earth was the proper name of the (original) Matter, this world of ours, which is not Matter, because it has become another thing, is unfit to bear the name of earth, seeing that that name belongs to something else, and is a stranger to its nature. But (you will tell me) Matter which has undergone creation, that is, our earth, had with its original a community of name no less than of kind. By no means. For although the pitcher is formed out of the clay, I shall no longer call it clay, but a pitcher; so likewise, although electrum6364

    6364 A mixed metal, of the colour of amber.

    is compounded of gold and silver, I shall yet not call it either gold or silver, but electrum. When there is a departure from the nature of any thing, there is likewise a relinquishment of its name—with a propriety which is alike demanded by the designation and the condition. How great a change indeed from the condition of that earth, which is Matter, has come over this earth of ours, is plain even from the fact that the latter has received this testimony to its goodness in Genesis, “And God saw that it was good;”6365

    6365


    Anf-03 v.v.xxx Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    as if these blended6427

    6427 Confusæ.

    substances, presented us with arguments for his massive pile of Matter.6428

    6428 Massalis illius molis.

    Now, so discriminating an enumeration of certain and distinct elements (as we have in this passage), which severally designates “darkness,” “the deep,” “the Spirit of God,” “the waters,” forbids the inference that anything confused or (from such confusion) uncertain is meant. Still more, when He ascribed to them their own places,6429

    6429 Situs.

    darkness on the face of the deep,” “the Spirit upon the face of the waters,” He repudiated all confusion in the substances; and by demonstrating their separate position,6430

    6430 Dispositionem.

    He demonstrated also their distinction.  Most absurd, indeed, would it be that Matter, which is introduced to our view as “without form,” should have its “formless” condition maintained by so many words indicative of form,6431

    6431 Tot formarum vocabulis.

    without any intimation of what that confused body6432

    6432 Corpus confusionis.

    is, which must of course be supposed to be unique,6433

    6433 Unicum.

    since it is without form.6434

    6434 Informe.

    For that which is without form is uniform; but even6435

    6435 Autem.

    that which is without form, when it is blended together6436

    6436 Confusum.

    from various component parts,6437

    6437 Ex varietate.

    must necessarily have one outward appearance;6438

    6438 Unam speciem.

    and it has not any appearance, until it has the one appearance (which comes) from many parts combined.6439

    6439 Unam ex multis speciem.

    Now Matter either had those specific parts6440

    6440 Istas species.

    within itself, from the words indicative of which it had to be understood—I mean “darkness,” and “the deep,” and “the Spirit,” and “the waters”—or it had them not. If it had them, how is it introduced as being “without form?”6441

    6441 Non habens formas.

    If it had them not, how does it become known?6442

    6442 Agnoscitur.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 8
    De spiritu. This shows that Tertullian took the spirit of Gen. i. 2 in the inferior sense.

    also Amos says, “He that strengtheneth the thunder6462

    6462 So also the Septuagint.

    , and createth the wind, and declareth His Christ6463

    6463 So also the Septuagint.

    unto men;”6464

    6464


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 19
    Gen. i. 2.

    refers to Matter, as indeed do all those other Scriptures here and there,6473

    6473 In disperso.

    which demonstrate that the separate parts were made out of Matter. It must follow, then,6474

    6474 Ergo: Tertullian’s answer.

    that as earth consisted of earth, so also depth consisted of depth, and darkness of darkness, and the wind and waters of wind and waters. And, as we said above,6475

    6475 Ch. xxx., towards the end.

    Matter could not have been without form, since it had specific parts, which were formed out of it—although as separate things6476

    6476 Ut et aliæ.

    —unless, indeed, they were not separate, but were the very same with those out of which they came. For it is really impossible that those specific things, which are set forth under the same names, should have been diverse; because in that case6477

    6477 Jam.

    the operation of God might seem to be useless,6478

    6478 Otiosa.

    if it made things which existed already; since that alone would be a creation,6479

    6479 Generatio: creation in the highest sense of matter issuing from the maker. Another reading has “generosiora essent,” for our “generatio sola esset,” meaning that, “those things would be nobler which had not been made,” which is obviously quite opposed to Tertullian’s argument.

    when things came into being, which had not been (previously) made. Therefore, to conclude, either Moses then pointed to Matter when he wrote the words: “And darkness was on the face of the deep, and the spirit of God moved on the face of the waters;” or else, inasmuch as these specific parts of creation are afterwards shown in other passages to have been made by God, they ought to have been with equal explicitness6480

    6480 Æque.

    shown to have been made out of the Matter which, according to you, Moses had previously mentioned;6481

    6481 Præmiserat.

    or else, finally, if Moses pointed to those specific parts, and not to Matter, I want to know where Matter has been pointed out at all.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.ix.xii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 6, 7.

    and God also said, “Let there be lights (in the firmament); and so God made a greater and a lesser light.”7901

    7901


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 10
    Gen. i. 6, 7, 8.

    the suspension of “the dry land” He accomplished by “separating the waters.” After the world had been hereupon set in order through its elements, when inhabitants were given it, “the waters” were the first to receive the precept “to bring forth living creatures.”8559

    8559 Animas.

    Water was the first to produce that which had life, that it might be no wonder in baptism if waters know how to give life.8560

    8560 Animare.

    For was not the work of fashioning man himself also achieved with the aid of waters?  Suitable material is found in the earth, yet not apt for the purpose unless it be moist and juicy; which (earth) “the waters,” separated the fourth day before into their own place, temper with their remaining moisture to a clayey consistency. If, from that time onward, I go forward in recounting universally, or at more length, the evidences of the “authority” of this element which I can adduce to show how great is its power or its grace; how many ingenious devices, how many functions, how useful an instrumentality, it affords the world, I fear I may seem to have collected rather the praises of water than the reasons of baptism; although I should thereby teach all the more fully, that it is not to be doubted that God has made the material substance which He has disposed throughout all His products8561

    8561 Rebus.

    and works, obey Him also in His own peculiar sacraments; that the material substance which governs terrestrial life acts as agent likewise in the celestial.


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 20
    Jer. x. 11.

    For, from the fact of his having subjoined their destruction, he shows them to be no gods at all. Elias, too, when all Israel was assembled at Mount Carmel, wishing to turn them from idolatry, says to them, “How long halt ye between two opinions?3346

    3346 Literally, “In both houghs,” in ambabus suffraginibus.

    If the Lord be God,3347

    3347 The old Latin translation has, “Si unus est Dominus Deus”—If the Lord God is one; which is supposed by the critics to have occurred through carelessness of the translator.

    follow Him.”3348

    3348


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 8.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiv Pg 35
    Amos ix. 6.

    certainly not for Himself alone, but for His people also, who will be with Him. “And Thou shalt bind them about Thee,” says he, “like the adornment of a bride.”3468

    3468


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 48
    Ascensum in cœlum: Sept. ἀνάβασιν εἰς τὸν οὐρανόν, Amos ix. 6. See on this passage the article Heaven in Kitto’s Cyclopædia (3d edit.), vol. ii. p. 245, where the present writer has discussed the probable meaning of the verse.

    which Christ “builds”—of course for His people.  There also is that everlasting abode of which Isaiah asks, “Who shall declare unto you the eternal place, but He (that is, of course, Christ) who walketh in righteousness, speaketh of the straight path, hateth injustice and iniquity?”4849

    4849


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 55
    See Isa. lii. 7, xxxiii. 14 (Sept.), and Amos ix. 6.

    Down in hell, however, it was said concerning them: “They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them!”—even those who did not believe them or at least did not sincerely4856

    4856 Omnino.

    believe that after death there were punishments for the arrogance of wealth and the glory of luxury, announced indeed by Moses and the prophets, but decreed by that God, who deposes princes from their thrones, and raiseth up the poor from dunghills.4857

    4857 119:90,91


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xx Pg 3
    Job xxxviii. 11.

    The ocean, impassable to man, and the worlds beyond it, are regulated by the same enactments of the Lord. The seasons of spring, summer, autumn, and winter, peacefully give place to one another. The winds in their several quarters89

    89 Or, “stations.”

    fulfil, at the proper time, their service without hindrance. The ever-flowing fountains, formed both for enjoyment and health, furnish without fail their breasts for the life of men. The very smallest of living beings meet together in peace and concord. All these the great Creator and Lord of all has appointed to exist in peace and harmony; while He does good to all, but most abundantly to us who have fled for refuge to His compassions through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom be glory and majesty for ever and ever. Amen.


    Anf-01 v.xiv.vi Pg 3
    Prov. viii. 27; 30.

    And how could a mere man be addressed in such words as these: “Sit Thou at My right hand?”1198

    1198


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxvi Pg 9
    Justin puts “sun and moon” instead of “Lucifer.” [Ps. cx. 3, Sept, compounded with Prov. viii. 27.] Maranus says, David did predict, not that Christ would be born of Mary before sun and moon, but that it would happen before sun and moon that He would be born of a virgin.

    according to the Father’s will, and made Him known, being Christ, as God strong and to be worshipped.”


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 15
    Prov. viii. 27–31.


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.vii Pg 8
    Ver. 27.

    Thus does He make Him equal to Him: for by proceeding from Himself He became His first-begotten Son, because begotten before all things;7829

    7829


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 3
    Prov. viii. 27.

    —even though the apostle asks, “Who hath known the mind of the Lord, or who hath been His counsellor?”7990

    7990


    Anf-03 v.ix.vi Pg 7
    Prov. viii. 27–30.

    Now, as soon as it pleased God to put forth into their respective substances and forms the things which He had planned and ordered within Himself, in conjunction with His Wisdom’s Reason and Word, He first put forth the Word Himself, having within Him His own inseparable Reason and Wisdom, in order that all things might be made through Him through whom they had been planned and disposed, yea, and already made, so far forth as (they were) in the mind and intelligence of God. This, however, was still wanting to them, that they should also be openly known, and kept permanently in their proper forms and substances.


    Anf-03 v.v.xviii Pg 11
    Prov. viii. 27–31.

    Now, who would not rather approve of6300

    6300 Commendet.

    this as the fountain and origin of all things—of this as, in very deed, the Matter of all Matter, not liable to any end,6301

    6301 “Non fini subditam” is Oehler’s better reading than the old “sibi subditam.”

    not diverse in condition, not restless in motion, not ungraceful in form, but natural, and proper, and duly proportioned, and beautiful, such truly as even God might well have required, who requires His own and not another’s? Indeed, as soon as He perceived It to be necessary for His creation of the world, He immediately creates It, and generates It in Himself. “The Lord,” says the Scripture, “possessed6302

    6302 Condidit: created.

    me, the beginning of His ways for the creation of His works. Before the worlds He founded me; before He made the earth, before the mountains were settled in their places; moreover, before the hills He generated me, and prior to the depths was I begotten.”6303

    6303


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxxviii Pg 2
    Isa. liv. 9 comes nearer to these words than any other passage; but still the exact quotation is not in Isaiah, or in any other part of Scripture. [It is quite probable that Isa. liv. 9 was thus misunderstood by the Jews, as Trypho seems to acquiesce.]

    By this which God said was meant that the mystery of saved men appeared in the deluge. For righteous Noah, along with the other mortals at the deluge, i.e., with his own wife, his three sons and their wives, being eight in number, were a symbol of the eighth day, wherein Christ appeared when He rose from the dead, for ever the first in power. For Christ, being the first-born of every creature, became again the chief of another race regenerated by Himself through water, and faith, and wood, containing the mystery of the cross; even as Noah was saved by wood when he rode over the waters with his household. Accordingly, when the prophet says, ‘I saved thee in the times of Noah,’ as I have already remarked, he addresses the people who are equally faithful to God, and possess the same signs. For when Moses had the rod in his hands, he led your nation through the sea. And you believe that this was spoken to your nation only, or to the land. But the whole earth, as the Scripture says, was inundated, and the water rose in height fifteen cubits above all the mountains: so that it is evident this was not spoken to the land, but to the people who obeyed Him: for whom also He had before prepared a resting-place in Jerusalem, as was previously demonstrated by all the symbols of the deluge; I mean, that by water, faith, and wood, those who are afore-prepared, and who repent of the sins which they have committed, shall escape from the impending judgment of God.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxxviii Pg 2
    Isa. liv. 9 comes nearer to these words than any other passage; but still the exact quotation is not in Isaiah, or in any other part of Scripture. [It is quite probable that Isa. liv. 9 was thus misunderstood by the Jews, as Trypho seems to acquiesce.]

    By this which God said was meant that the mystery of saved men appeared in the deluge. For righteous Noah, along with the other mortals at the deluge, i.e., with his own wife, his three sons and their wives, being eight in number, were a symbol of the eighth day, wherein Christ appeared when He rose from the dead, for ever the first in power. For Christ, being the first-born of every creature, became again the chief of another race regenerated by Himself through water, and faith, and wood, containing the mystery of the cross; even as Noah was saved by wood when he rode over the waters with his household. Accordingly, when the prophet says, ‘I saved thee in the times of Noah,’ as I have already remarked, he addresses the people who are equally faithful to God, and possess the same signs. For when Moses had the rod in his hands, he led your nation through the sea. And you believe that this was spoken to your nation only, or to the land. But the whole earth, as the Scripture says, was inundated, and the water rose in height fifteen cubits above all the mountains: so that it is evident this was not spoken to the land, but to the people who obeyed Him: for whom also He had before prepared a resting-place in Jerusalem, as was previously demonstrated by all the symbols of the deluge; I mean, that by water, faith, and wood, those who are afore-prepared, and who repent of the sins which they have committed, shall escape from the impending judgment of God.


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    and all other things in succession; but neither gods nor angels [had any share in the work].


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxviii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    then the sun, and the moon, and the stars. For having learned this in Egypt, and having been much taken with what Moses had written in the Genesis of the world, he fabled that Vulcan had made in the shield of Achilles a kind of representation of the creation of the world. For he wrote thus:2568

    2568 Iliad, xviii. 483.

    “There he described the earth, the heaven, the sea, The sun that rests not, and the moon full-orb’d; There also, all the stars which round about, As with a radiant frontlet, bind the skies.”


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 2
    Gen. i. 1.

    for, as they maintain, by naming these four,—God, beginning, heaven, and earth,—he set forth their Tetrad. Indicating also its invisible and hidden nature, he said, “Now the earth was invisible and unformed.”2880

    2880


    Anf-02 iii.ii.v Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 17.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.iii Pg 11
    Gen. i. 1.

    and as long as He continued making, one after the other, those things of which He was to be the Lord, it merely mentions God.  “And God said,” “and God made,” “and God saw;”6160

    6160


    Anf-03 v.v.xix Pg 6
    Gen. i. 1.

    just as it would have said, “At last God made the heaven and the earth,” if God had created these after all the rest.  Now, if the beginning is a substance, the end must also be material. No doubt, a substantial thing6320

    6320 Substantivum aliquid.

    may be the beginning of some other thing which may be formed out of it; thus the clay is the beginning of the vessel, and the seed is the beginning of the plant. But when we employ the word beginning in this sense of origin, and not in that of order, we do not omit to mention also the name of that particular thing which we regard as the origin of the other. On the other hand,6321

    6321 De cetero.

    if we were to make such a statement as this, for example, “In the beginning the potter made a basin or a water-jug,” the word beginning will not here indicate a material substance (for I have not mentioned the clay, which is the beginning in this sense, but only the order of the work, meaning that the potter made the basin and the jug first, before anything else—intending afterwards to make the rest. It is, then, to the order of the works that the word beginning has reference, not to the origin of their substances. I might also explain this word beginning in another way, which would not, however, be inapposite.6322

    6322 Non ab re tamen.

    The Greek term for beginning, which is ἀρχή, admits the sense not only of priority of order, but of power as well; whence princes and magistrates are called ἀρχοντες. Therefore in this sense too, beginning may be taken for princely authority and power. It was, indeed, in His transcendent authority and power, that God made the heaven and the earth.


    Anf-03 v.v.xx Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    —“and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  All things were made by Him, and without Him nothing was made.”6333

    6333


    Anf-03 v.v.xxii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 1.

    I revere6345

    6345 Adoro: reverently admire.

    the fulness of His Scripture, in which He manifests to me both the Creator and the creation. In the gospel, moreover, I discover a Minister and Witness of the Creator, even His Word.6346

    6346


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 3
    Gen. i. 1.

    The Scripture, which at its very outset proposes to run through the order thereof tells us as its first information that it was created; it next proceeds to set forth what sort of earth it was.6367

    6367 Qualitatem ejus: unless this means “how He made it,” like the “qualiter fecerit” below.

    In like manner with respect to the heaven, it informs us first of its creation—“In the beginning God made the heaven:”6368

    6368


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    it then goes on to introduce its arrangement; how that God both separated “the water which was below the firmament from that which was above the firmament,”6369

    6369


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 29
    Cum cælo separavit: Gen. i. 1.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 20
    Jer. x. 11.

    For, from the fact of his having subjoined their destruction, he shows them to be no gods at all. Elias, too, when all Israel was assembled at Mount Carmel, wishing to turn them from idolatry, says to them, “How long halt ye between two opinions?3346

    3346 Literally, “In both houghs,” in ambabus suffraginibus.

    If the Lord be God,3347

    3347 The old Latin translation has, “Si unus est Dominus Deus”—If the Lord God is one; which is supposed by the critics to have occurred through carelessness of the translator.

    follow Him.”3348

    3348


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 25.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 153.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 8.1


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxi Pg 26
    Joel iii. 16; Amos i. 2.

    And that it is from that region which is towards the south of the inheritance of Judah that the Son of God shall come, who is God, and who was from Bethlehem, where the Lord was born [and] will send out His praise through all the earth, thus3705

    3705 As Massuet observes, we must either expunge “sciut” altogether, or read “sic” as above.

    says the prophet Habakkuk: “God shall come from the south, and the Holy One from Mount Effrem. His power covered the heavens over, and the earth is full of His praise. Before His face shall go forth the Word, and His feet shall advance in the plains.”3706

    3706


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 65
    Joel iii. 16.

    and, “In Judah is God known;”4306

    4306


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 28

    VERSE 	(8) - 

    Ps 18:7; 46:3 Job 9:6 Isa 13:13 Joe 3:16 Hag 2:6,21 Heb 12:26


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET