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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 12:20


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    King James Bible - Acts 12:20

    And Herod was highly displeased with them of Tyre and Sidon: but they came with one accord to him, and, having made Blastus the king's chamberlain their friend, desired peace; because their country was nourished by the king's country.

    World English Bible

    Now Herod was very angry with the people of Tyre and Sidon. They came with one accord to him, and, having made Blastus, the king's
    personal aide, their friend, they asked for peace, because their country depended on the king's country for food.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 12:20

    And he was angry with the Tyrians and the Sidonians. But they with one accord came to him, and having gained Blastus, who was the king's chamberlain, they desired peace, because their countries were nourished by him.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And Herod was highly displeased with them of Tyre and Sidon. But they came with one accord to him, and having made Blastus the king's chamberlain their friend, desired peace, because their
    country was nourished by the king's country.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ην
    2258 5713 V-IXI-3S δε 1161 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM ηρωδης 2264 N-NSM θυμομαχων 2371 5723 V-PAP-NSM τυριοις 5183 N-DPM και 2532 CONJ σιδωνιοις 4606 A-DPF ομοθυμαδον 3661 ADV δε 1161 CONJ παρησαν 3918 5713 V-IXI-3P προς 4314 PREP αυτον 846 P-ASM και 2532 CONJ πεισαντες 3982 5660 V-AAP-NPM βλαστον 986 N-ASM τον 3588 T-ASM επι 1909 PREP του 3588 T-GSM κοιτωνος 2846 N-GSM του 3588 T-GSM βασιλεως 935 N-GSM ητουντο 154 5710 V-IMI-3P ειρηνην 1515 N-ASF δια 1223 PREP το 3588 T-ASN τρεφεσθαι 5142 5745 V-PPN αυτων 846 P-GPM την 3588 T-ASF χωραν 5561 N-ASF απο 575 PREP της 3588 T-GSF βασιλικης 937 A-GSF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (20) -
    Pr 17:14; 20:18; 25:8 Ec 10:4 Isa 27:4,5 Lu 14:31,32

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 12:20

    ¶ Y Herodes estaba enojado contra los de Tiro y los de Sidn; pero ellos vinieron concordes a l, y sobornado Blasto, que era el camarero del rey, pedían paz; porque las tierras de ellos eran abastecidas por las del rey.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 12:20

    Verse 20. Highly displeased with them of
    Tyre] On what account Herod was thus displeased is not related by any historian, as far as I have been able to ascertain. Josephus, who speaks of this journey of Herod to Caesarea, says nothing of it; and it is useless for us to conjecture.

    Having made Blastus-their friend] Blastus was probably a eunuch, and had considerable influence over his master Herod; and, to reach the master, it is likely they bribed the chamberlain.

    Desired peace] The Tyrians and Sidonians being equally subjects of the Roman government with the inhabitants of Galilee, Herod could not go to war with them; but, being irritated against them, he might prevent their supplies: they therefore endeavoured to be on peaceable, i.e. friendly, terms with him.

    Their country was nourished by the king's country.] That is, they had all their supplies from Galilee; for Tyre and Sidon, being places of trade and commerce, with little territory, were obliged to have all their provisions from the countries under Herod's jurisdiction. This had been the case even from the days of Solomon, as we learn from 1 Kings v. 11; where it is said that Solomon gave Hiram twenty thousand measures of wheat, for food to his household; and twenty measures of pure oil: thus gave Solomon to Hiram year by year. See also Ezek. xxvii. 17.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 20. And Herod was highly displeased with them of Tyre and Sidon , etc.] Two cities on the sea coast, in the land of Phoenicia; with the inhabitants of which Herod was so enraged, that though he had not declared war against them, yet he had meditated it in his mind, and intended to do it at a proper time: what gave him this offence is not certain; that it should be for entertaining and concealing of Peter, when he made his escape, is without any foundation; and nothing but this following on that account, could ever occasion such a thought: but they came with one accord to him; the ambassadors from both cities united in an address to him, and joined in ways and means to reconcile him to them: and having made Blastus the kings chamberlain their friend ; not merely by arguments, entreaties, and good works, but very likely by gifts, by making presents to him: persons in such an office had usually very great interest in the princes they served f592 , as Blastus doubtless had with Herod; Commodus the emperor did every thing at the instances of his chamberlains, and so other princes; for these officers had access when others could not, the kings bedchamber next to sacred; and therefore the Tyrians and Sidonians privately applied to him first: desired peace ; either of Herod himself, to whom, by the means of Blastus, they were introduced; and in their address to him, entreated he would forgive the offence, and be at peace with them; or else of Blastus, whom by some means or another they made their friend; and therefore entreated of him, that he would use his interest with the king, and procure peace for them: and this sense the Arabic version inclines to, which renders the words thus, and they prayed him that he would take care of reconciliation and peace; though the former seems to be the true sense: because their country was nourished by the kings country. These cities were seaports, and the inhabitants of them were much concerned in sending ships to sea, and in merchandise; and it was in Judea and Galilee, which were under Herods jurisdiction, where they vented the goods they imported, and from whence they were supplied with wheat, honey, and oil, both for their own use, and perhaps to export abroad; (see 1 Kings 5:1,11) ( Ezekiel 27:3,17), etc. And it looks as if Herod had forbid all commerce with them, which if it had been continued, would have been the ruin of them.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 20-25 - Many
    heathen princes claimed and received Divine honours, but it wa far more horrible impiety in Herod, who knew the word and worship of the living God, to accept such idolatrous honours without rebuking the blasphemy. And such men as Herod, when puffed with pride and vanity are ripening fast for signal vengeance. God is very jealous for his ow honour, and will be glorified upon those whom he is not glorified by See what vile bodies we carry about with us; they have in them the seeds of their own dissolution, by which they will soon be destroyed whenever God does but speak the word. We may learn wisdom from the people of Tyre and Sidon, for we have offended the Lord with our sins We depend on him for life, and breath, and all things; it surely the behoves us to humble ourselves before him, that through the appointe Mediator, who is ever ready to befriend us, we may be reconciled to him, lest wrath come upon us to the utmost __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ην
    2258 5713 V-IXI-3S δε 1161 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM ηρωδης 2264 N-NSM θυμομαχων 2371 5723 V-PAP-NSM τυριοις 5183 N-DPM και 2532 CONJ σιδωνιοις 4606 A-DPF ομοθυμαδον 3661 ADV δε 1161 CONJ παρησαν 3918 5713 V-IXI-3P προς 4314 PREP αυτον 846 P-ASM και 2532 CONJ πεισαντες 3982 5660 V-AAP-NPM βλαστον 986 N-ASM τον 3588 T-ASM επι 1909 PREP του 3588 T-GSM κοιτωνος 2846 N-GSM του 3588 T-GSM βασιλεως 935 N-GSM ητουντο 154 5710 V-IMI-3P ειρηνην 1515 N-ASF δια 1223 PREP το 3588 T-ASN τρεφεσθαι 5142 5745 V-PPN αυτων 846 P-GPM την 3588 T-ASF χωραν 5561 N-ASF απο 575 PREP της 3588 T-GSF βασιλικης 937 A-GSF

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    20. Highly displeased (qumomacwn). Originally, to
    fight desperately: but as there is no record of any war of Herod with the Tyrians and Sidonians, the word is to be taken in the sense of the A.V. Only here in New Testament.

    Chamberlain (ton epi tou koitwnov). Lit., the one over the bedchamber.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    12:20 {Was highly displeased} (en qumomacwn). Periphrastic imperfect active of qumomacew, late compound of qumos (passionate heat) and macomai, to fight. Only here in the N.T., to fight desperately, to have a hot quarrel. Whether it was open war with the Phoenicians or just violent hostility we do not know, save that Phoenicia belonged to Syria and Herod Agrippa had no authority there. The quarrel may have been over commercial matters. {They came with one accord} (homoqumadon paresan). The representatives of Tyre and Sidon. See on 1:14 for homoqumadon. Tyre was a colony of Sidon and had become one of the chief commercial cities of the world by reason of the Phoenician ships. {The king's chamberlain} (ton epi tou koitwnos tou basileos). The one over the bedchamber (koitwnos, late word from koite, bed, here only in the N.T.). {Made their friend} (peisantes). First aorist active participle of peiqw, to persuade. Having persuaded (probably with bribes as in #Mt 28:14). {They asked for peace} (eitounto eirenen). Imperfect middle of aitew, kept on asking for peace. {Because their country was fed} (dia to trefesqai autwn ten coran). Causal sentence with dia and the articular infinitive (present passive of trefw, to nourish or feed) and the accusative of general reference, "because of the being fed as to their country." Tyre and Sidon as large commercial cities on the coast received large supplies of grain and fruits from Palestine. Herod had cut off the supplies and that brought the two cities to action.


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