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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 18:18


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     
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    King James Bible - Acts 18:18

    And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while, and then took his leave of the brethren, and sailed thence into Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila; having shorn his head in Cenchrea: for he had a vow.

    World English Bible

    Paul, having stayed after this many more days, took his leave of the brothers, and sailed from there for Syria, together with Priscilla and Aquila. He
    shaved his head in Cenchreae, for he had a vow.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 18:18

    But Paul, when he had stayed yet many days, taking his leave of the brethren, sailed thence into Syria (and with him Priscilla and Aquila), having shorn his
    head in Cenchrae: for he had a vow.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while, and took his leave of the brethren, and sailed thence into Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila; having shorn his
    head in Cenchrea: for he had a vow.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ο
    3588 T-NSM δε 1161 CONJ παυλος 3972 N-NSM ετι 2089 ADV προσμεινας 4357 5660 V-AAP-NSM ημερας 2250 N-APF ικανας 2425 A-APF τοις 3588 T-DPM αδελφοις 80 N-DPM αποταξαμενος 657 5671 V-AMP-NSM εξεπλει 1602 5707 V-IAI-3S εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF συριαν 4947 N-ASF και 2532 CONJ συν 4862 PREP αυτω 846 P-DSM πρισκιλλα 4252 N-NSF και 2532 CONJ ακυλας 207 N-NSM κειραμενος 2751 5671 V-AMP-NSM την 3588 T-ASF κεφαλην 2776 N-ASF εν 1722 PREP κεγχρεαις 2747 N-DPF ειχεν 2192 5707 V-IAI-3S γαρ 1063 CONJ ευχην 2171 N-ASF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (18) -
    Ac 15:23,41; 21:3 Ga 1:21

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 18:18

    ¶ Mas Pablo habindose detenido aun allí muchos días, despus se despidi de los hermanos, y naveg a Siria, y con l Priscila y Aquila, habindose trasquilado la cabeza en Cencrea, porque tenía voto.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 18:18

    Verse 18. And Paul-tarried there yet a good while] The persecuting
    Jews plainly saw, from the manner in which the proconsul had conducted this business, that they could have no hope of raising a state persecution against the apostles; and the laws provided so amply for the personal safety of every Roman citizen that then were afraid to proceed any farther in their violence. It would not be unknown that Paul was possessed of the right of Roman citizenship; and therefore his person was sacred as long as he did nothing contrary to the laws.

    It is probable that at this time Paul stayed, on the whole, as Corinth, about two years.

    Having shorn his head in Cenchrea] But who was it that shore his head? Paul or Aquila? Some think the latter, who had bound himself by the Nazarite vow, probably before he became a Christian; and, being under that vow, his conscience would not permit him to disregard it. There is nothing in the text that absolutely obliges us to understand this action as belonging to St. Paul. It seems to have been the act of Aquila alone; and therefore both Paul and Priscilla are mentioned before Aquila; and it is natural to refer the vow to the latter. Yet there are certainly some weighty reasons why the vow should be referred to St. Paul, and not to Aquila; and interpreters are greatly divided on the subject. Chrysostom, Isidore of Seville, Grotius, Hammond, Zegerus, Erasmus, Baronius, Pearce, Wesley, and others, refer the vow to Aquila.-Jerome, Augustin, Bede, Calmet, Dodd, Rosenmuller, and others, refer it to St. Paul. Each party has its strong reasons-the matter is doubtful-the bare letter of the text determines nothing: yet I cannot help leaning to the latter opinion. Perhaps it was from feeling the difficulty of deciding which was under the vow that the AEthiopic and two Latin versions, instead of keiramenov, having shaved, in the singular, appear to have read keiramenoi, they shaved; and thus put both Paul and Aquila under the vow.

    Cenchrea. This was a port on the east side of the isthmus of Corinth, opposite to the Lecheum, which was the other port on the west.

    And it is likely that it was at Cenchrea that St. Paul took shipping for Syria, as it would be more convenient her him, and a shorter passage to embark at Cenchrea, in order to go by the AEgean Sea to Syria, than to embark at the Lecheum, and sail down into the Mediterranean. This isthmus is generally described now as dividing the Gulf of Lepanto, on the west, from the Gulf of Engia, or Eginaon, on the east.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 18. And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while , etc.] A year and a half, as in ( Acts 18:11) for this insurrection might follow immediately upon the vision the apostle had; and who by that was encouraged to continue in this city, notwithstanding the treatment he met with; he not doubting of the promise of God, and of his power and faithfulness to fulfil it, though this was a trial of his faith and constancy: and then took his leave of the brethren ; whom he had been instrumental in the conversion of, and had established and confirmed in the faith; and having now done his work in this place, at least for the time present, he takes his leave of them and departs: and sailed thence into Syria ; or towards Syria, for he took Ephesus by the way, which was in Asia, and stopped there a little while: and with him Priscilla and Aquila ; whom he had met with at Corinth, and with whom he had lodged and wrought at his trade, ( Acts 18:2,3) Having shorn his head in Cenchrea ; which some understand not of Paul, but of Aquila, who is the last person spoken of; and the Ethiopic version reads in the plural number, referring this to both Priscilla and Aquila, and they had shaved their heads, for they had a vow; and so it was read in a manuscript of Baronius, and Bede observes, that it was read in like manner in some copies in his time; but the more authentic reading is in the singular number, and is more generally understood of the Apostle Paul; who being about to go into Judea, to the Jew became a Jew, that he might gain some:

    Cenchrea, where this was done, was a sea port belonging to the Corinthians, on the east of the Isthmus, as Lechea was on the west; according to Pliny f935 , there were two gulfs, or bays, to the Isthmus, the one he calls the Corinthian bay, and others the Crissean and Alcyonian bay, and Golfo de Petras; the other the Saronic bay, now called Golfo de Engia; Lechea was in the Corinthian bay, and Cenchrea in the Saronic bay; and both belonged to Corinth, and were the bounds of the Straights; the space between them was the Isthmus, which consisted of about five miles; and so Pausanias says f936 , the Isthmus of the Corinthians is washed on both sides by the sea; on one side at Cenchrea, and on the other at Lechea, and this makes the island a continent; and likewise Philo giving an account of a voyage of Flaccus says, that passing over the Ionian gulf, he came to the sea (or shore) of Corinth - and going over the Isthmus from Lechea, to the opposite sea, he came down to Cenchrea, a seaport of the Corinthians; of which Apuleius gives this account: this town is a most noble colony of the Corinthians, it is washed by the Aegean and Saronic sea, where there is a port, a most safe receptacle for ships, and very populous.

    Hither the apostle came from Corinth to take shipping, and from hence he sailed to Syria, as before observed: it has its name either from millet, for Cenchros signifies millet; and Cenchrias is bread made of millet; or from the bird Cenchris, which is a kind of hawk; (see Gill on Romans 16:1). For he had a vow ; this, some think, could not be the vow of the Nazarites, for then he should have stayed till he came to Jerusalem, and have shaved his head at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation, and cast the hair into the fire, under the pot in which the peace offerings were boiled f939 ; though he that vowed in the country, was not obliged to this: others think it was such an one as the Jews in travelling used, that they would not shave till they came to such a place; and so the apostle had made a vow that he would shave at Cenchrea; and accordingly did; but this is not likely, that the apostle should make a vow upon so light an occasion: others that it refers to his going to Jerusalem, to keep the feast there, ( Acts 18:21) and so these think the words are a reason, not of his shaving of his head, but of his sailing to Syria; the first is most probable, that it was a Nazarites vow; (see Acts 21:24).


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 18-23 - While Paul found he laboured not in vain, he continued labouring. Ou times are in God's hand; we purpose, but he disposes; therefore we mus make all promises with submission to the will of God; not only i providence permits, but if God does not otherwise direct our motions. very good refreshment it is to a faithful minister, to have for awhil the society of his brethren. Disciples are compassed about with infirmity; ministers must do what they can to strengthen them, be directing them to Christ, who is their Strength. Let us earnestly seek in our several places, to promote the cause of Christ, forming plan that appear to us most proper, but relying on the Lord to bring them to pass if he sees good.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ο
    3588 T-NSM δε 1161 CONJ παυλος 3972 N-NSM ετι 2089 ADV προσμεινας 4357 5660 V-AAP-NSM ημερας 2250 N-APF ικανας 2425 A-APF τοις 3588 T-DPM αδελφοις 80 N-DPM αποταξαμενος 657 5671 V-AMP-NSM εξεπλει 1602 5707 V-IAI-3S εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF συριαν 4947 N-ASF και 2532 CONJ συν 4862 PREP αυτω 846 P-DSM πρισκιλλα 4252 N-NSF και 2532 CONJ ακυλας 207 N-NSM κειραμενος 2751 5671 V-AMP-NSM την 3588 T-ASF κεφαλην 2776 N-ASF εν 1722 PREP κεγχρεαις 2747 N-DPF ειχεν 2192 5707 V-IAI-3S γαρ 1063 CONJ ευχην 2171 N-ASF

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    18. Took his leave (apotazamenov). See on
    Luke ix. 61; Mark vi. 46. Priscilla and Aquila. They are named in the same order, Rom. xvi. 3; 2 Timothy iv. 19.

    Having shorn his head. Referring to Paul, and not to Aquila.

    He had a vow. A private vow, such as was often assumed by the Jews in consequence of some mercy received or of some deliverance from danger. Not the Nazarite vow, though similar in its obligations; for, in the case of that vow, the cutting of the hair, which marked the close of the period of obligation, could take place only in Jerusalem.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    18:18 {Having tarried after this yet many days} (eti prosmeinas hemeras hikanas). First aorist (constative) active participle of prosmenw, old verb, to remain besides (pros as in #1Ti 1:3) and that idea is expressed also in eti (yet). The accusative is extent of time. On Luke's frequent use of hikanos see #8:11. It is not certain that this period of "considerable days" which followed the trial before Gallio is included in the year and six months of verse #11 or is in addition to it which is most likely. Vindicated as Paul was, there was no reason for haste in leaving, though he usually left after such a crisis was passed. {Took his leave} (apotaxamenos). First aorist middle (direct), old verb, to separate oneself, to bid farewell (Vulgate _valefacio_), as in verse #21; Mr 6:46. {Sailed thence} (exeplei). Imperfect active of ekplew, old and common verb, inchoative imperfect, started to sail. Only Priscilla and Aquila are mentioned as his companions though others may have been in the party. {Having shorn his head} (keiramenos ten kefalen). First aorist middle (causative) of keirw, old verb to shear (sheep) and the hair as also in #1Co 11:6. The participle is masculine and so cannot refer to Priscilla. Aquila comes next to the participle, but since mention of Priscilla and Aquila is parenthetical and the two other participles (prosmeinas, apotaxamenos) refer to Paul it seems clear that this one does also. {For he had a vow} (eicen gar eucen). Imperfect active showing the continuance of the vow up till this time in Cenchreae, the port of Corinth when it expired. It was not a Nazarite vow which could be absolved only in Jerusalem. It is possible that the hair was only polled or trimmed, cut shorter, not "shaved" (xuraw as in #21:24) for there is a distinction as both verbs are contrasted in #1Co 11:6 (keirasqai e xurasqai). It is not clear what sort of a vow Paul had taken nor why he took it. It may have been a thank offering for the outcome at Corinth (Hackett). Paul as a Jew kept up his observance of the ceremonial law, but refused to impose it on the Gentiles.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

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