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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Exodus 9:29


    CHAPTERS: Exodus 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35

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    King James Bible - Exodus 9:29

    And Moses said unto him, As soon as I am gone out of the city, I will spread abroad my hands unto the LORD; and the thunder shall cease, neither shall there be any more hail; that thou mayest know how that the earth is the LORD's.

    World English Bible

    Moses said to him, "As soon as I have gone out of the city, I will spread abroad my hands to Yahweh. The thunders shall cease, neither shall there be any more hail; that you may know that the earth is Yahweh's.

    Douay-Rheims - Exodus 9:29

    Moses said: As soon as I am gone out of the city, I will stretch forth my hands to the Lord, and the thunders shall cease, and the hail shall be no more: that thou mayst know that the earth is the Lord's.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And
    Moses said to him, As soon as I am gone out of the city, I will spread abroad my hands to the LORD; and the thunder shall cease, neither shall there be any more hail; that thou mayest know how that the earth is the LORD'S.

    Original Hebrew

    ויאמר
    559 אליו 413 משׁה 4872 כצאתי 3318 את 853 העיר 5892 אפרשׂ 6566 את 853 כפי 3709 אל 413 יהוה 3068 הקלות 6963 יחדלון 2308 והברד 1259 לא 3808 יהיה 1961 עוד 5750 למען 4616 תדע 3045 כי 3588 ליהוה 3068 הארץ׃ 776

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (29) -
    :33 1Ki 8:22,38 2Ch 6:12,13 Ezr 9:5 Job 11:13 Ps 143:6

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 9:29

    Y le respondió Moisés: Saliendo yo de la ciudad extenderé mis manos al SEÑOR, y los truenos cesarán, y no habrá más granizo; para que sepas que del SEÑOR es la tierra.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Exodus 9:29

    Verse 29. I will spread abroad my
    hands] That is, I will make supplication to God that he may remove this plague. This may not be an improper place to make some observations on the ancient manner of approaching the Divine Being in prayer. Kneeling down, stretching out the hands, and lifting them up to heaven, were in frequent use among the Heb. in their religious worship. SOLOMON kneeled down on his knees, and spread forth his hands to heaven; 2 Chron. vi. 13. So DAVID, Psalm cxliii. 6: I stretch forth my hands unto thee. So Ezra: I fell upon my knees, and spread out my hands unto the Lord my God; Ezra ix. 5. See also Job Job xi. 13: If thou prepare thine heart, and stretch out thy hands towards him. Most nations who pretended to any kind of worship made use of the same means in approaching the objects of their adoration, viz., kneeling down and stretching out their hands; which custom it is very likely they borrowed from the people of God. Kneeling was ever considered to be the proper posture of supplication, as it expresses humility, contrition, and subjection. If the person to whom the supplication was addressed was within reach, the supplicant caught him by the knees; for as among the ancients the forehead was consecrated to genius, the ear to memory, and the right hand to faith, so the knees were consecrated to mercy. Hence those who entreated favour fell at and caught hold of the knees of the person whose kindness they supplicated. This mode of supplication is particularly referred to in the following passages in Homer: - twn nun min mnhsasa parezeo, kai labe gounwn.Iliad i., ver. 407.

    Now therefore, of these things reminding Jove, Embrace his knees.COWPER.

    To which the following answer is made:- kai totÆ epeita toi eimi diov poti calkobatev dw, kai min gounasomai, kai min peisesqai oiw.Iliad i., ver. 426.

    Then will I to Jove's brazen-floor'd abode, That I may clasp his knees; and much misdeem Of my endeavour, or my prayer shall speed. Id. See the issue of thus addressing Jove, Ibid., ver. 500-502, and ver. 511, &c.

    In the same manner we find our Lord accosted, Matt. xvii. 14: There came to him a certain man, kneeling down to him gonupetwn auton, falling down at his knees.

    As to the lifting up or stretching out of the hands, (often joined to kneeling,) of which we have seen already several instances, and of which we have a very remarkable one in this book, chap. xvii. 11, where the lifting up or stretching out of the hands of Moses was the means of Israel's prevailing over Amalek; we find many examples of both in ancient authors. Thus HOMER:- esqlon gar du ceirav anascemen, ai kÆ elehsh.Iliad xxiv., ver. 301.

    For right it is to spread abroad the hands To Jove for mercy.Also VIRGIL:- Corripio e stratis corpus, TENDOQUE SUPINAS AD COELUM cum voce MANUS, et munera libo AEneid iii., ver. 176.I started from my bed, and raised on high My hands and voice in rapture to the sky; And pour libations.PITT.

    Dixerat: et GENUA AMPLEXUS, genibusque volutans Haerebat. Ibid., ver. 607.

    Then kneel'd the wretch, and suppliant clung around My knees with tears, and grovell'd on the ground. Id.- media inter numina divum Multa Jovem Manibus SUPPLEX orasse SUPINIS. Ibid. iv., ver. 204.

    Amidst the statues of the gods he stands, And spreading forth to Jove his lifted hands. Id.

    Et DUPLICES cum voce MANUS ad sidera TENDIT. Ibid. x., ver. 667.

    And lifted both his hands and voice to heaven. In some cases the person petitioning came forward, and either sat in the dust or kneeled on the ground, placing his left hand on the knee of him from whom he expected the favour, while he touched the person's chin with his right. We have an instance of this also in HOMER: kai ra paroiqÆ autoio kaqezeto, kai labe gounwn skaih? dexiterh dÆ arÆ upÆ anqerewnov elousa.Iliad i., ver. 500.

    Suppliant the goddess stood: one hand she placed Beneath his chin, and one his knee embraced. POPE.

    When the supplicant could not approach the person to whom he prayed, as where a deity was the object of the prayer, he washed his hands, made an offering, and kneeling down, either stretched out both his hands to heaven, or laid them upon the offering or sacrifice, or upon the altar. Thus Homer represents the priest of Apollo praying:- cerniyanto dÆ epeita, kai oulocutav anelonto.

    toisin de crushv megalÆ euceto, ceirav anascwn.Iliad i., ver. 449.

    With water purify their hands, and take The sacred offering of the salted cake, While thus, with arms devoutly raised in air, And solemn voice, the priest directs his prayer.POPE.

    How necessary ablutions of the whole body, and of the hands particularly, accompanied with offerings and sacrifices were, under the law, every reader of the Bible knows: see especially chap. xxix. 1-4, where Aaron and his sons were commanded to be washed, previously to their performing the priest's office; and chap. xxx. 19-21, where it is said: "Aaron and his sons shall wash their hands - that they die not." See also Lev. xvii. 15.

    When the high priest among the Jews blessed the people, he lifted up his hands, Lev. ix. 22. And the Israelites, when they presented a sacrifice to God, lifted up their hands and placed them on the head of the victim: "If any man of you bring an offering unto the Lord-of the cattle of the herd, and of the flock] he shall put his hand upon the head of the burnt-offering, and it shall be accepted for him, to make atonement for him;" Lev. i. 2-4. To these circumstances the apostle alludes, 1 Tim. ii. 8: "I will therefore that men pray everywhere, lifting up holy hands, without wrath and doubting." In the apostle's word epairontav, lifting up, there is a manifest reference to stretching out the hands to place them either on the altar or on the head of the victim. Four things were signified by this lifting up of the hands. 1. It was the posture of supplication, and expressed a strong invitation-Come to my help; 2. It expressed the earnest desire of the person to lay hold on the help he required, by bringing him who was the object of his prayer to his assistance; 3. It showed the ardour of the person to receive the blessings he expected; and 4. By this act he designated and consecrated his offering or sacrifice to his God.

    From a great number of evidences and coincidences it is not unreasonable to conclude that the heathens borrowed all that was pure and rational, even in their mode of worship, from the ancient people of God; and that the preceding quotations are proofs of this.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 22-35 - Woful havoc this hail made: it killed both men and cattle; the cor above ground was destroyed, and that only preserved which as yet wa not come up. The land of Goshen was preserved. God causes rain or hai on one city and not on another, either in mercy or in judgment. Pharao humbled himself to Moses. No man could have spoken better: he own himself wrong; he owns that the Lord is righteous; and God must be justified when he speaks, though he speaks in thunder and lightning Yet his heart was hardened all this while. Moses pleads with God though he had reason to think Pharaoh would repent of his repentance and he told him so, yet he promises to be his friend. Moses went out of the city, notwithstanding the hail and lightning which kept Pharaoh an his servants within doors. Peace with God makes men thunder-proof Pharaoh was frightened by the tremendous judgment; but when that wa over, his fair promises were forgotten. Those that are not bettered by judgments and mercies, commonly become worse __________________________________________________________________


    Original Hebrew

    ויאמר 559 אליו 413 משׁה 4872 כצאתי 3318 את 853 העיר 5892 אפרשׂ 6566 את 853 כפי 3709 אל 413 יהוה 3068 הקלות 6963 יחדלון 2308 והברד 1259 לא 3808 יהיה 1961 עוד 5750 למען 4616 תדע 3045 כי 3588 ליהוה 3068 הארץ׃ 776


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35

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