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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Isaiah 24:19


    CHAPTERS: Isaiah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Isaiah 24:19

    ταραχη ταραχθησεται η 2228 1510 5753 3739 3588 γη 1093 και 2532 απορια 640 απορηθησεται η 2228 1510 5753 3739 3588 γη 1093

    Douay Rheims Bible

    With breaking shall the earth be broken, with
    crushing shall the earth be crushed, with trembling shall the earth be moved.

    King James Bible - Isaiah 24:19

    The earth is utterly broken down, the earth is clean dissolved, the earth is moved exceedingly.

    World English Bible

    The earth is utterly broken. The earth is torn apart. The earth is shaken violently.

    Early Church Father Links

    Npnf-109 v.iii Pg 58

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Isaiah 24:19

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 31.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iv Pg 3
    Ps. cii. 25–28. The cause of the difference in the numbering of the Psalms is that the Septuagint embraces in one psalm—the ninth—the two which form the ninth and tenth in the Hebrew text.

    pointing out plainly what things they are that pass away, and who it is that doth endure for ever—God, together with His servants. And in like manner Esaias says: “Lift up your eyes to the heavens, and look upon the earth beneath; for the heaven has been set together as smoke, and the earth shall wax old like a garment, and they who dwell therein shall die in like manner. But my salvation shall be for ever, and my righteousness shall not pass away.”3832

    3832


    Anf-03 v.v.xlv Pg 7
    Ps. cii. 25.

    wherewith “He hath meted out the heaven, and the earth with a span.”6598

    6598


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxiv Pg 8
    Ps. cii. 25, 26.

    Now to be changed is to fall from that primitive state which they lose whilst undergoing the change. “And the stars too shall fall from heaven, even as a fig-tree casteth her green figs6495

    6495 Acerba sua “grossos suos” (Rigalt.). So our marginal reading.

    when she is shaken of a mighty wind.”6496

    6496


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxiv Pg 8
    Ps. cii. 25, 26.

    Now to be changed is to fall from that primitive state which they lose whilst undergoing the change. “And the stars too shall fall from heaven, even as a fig-tree casteth her green figs6495

    6495 Acerba sua “grossos suos” (Rigalt.). So our marginal reading.

    when she is shaken of a mighty wind.”6496

    6496


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxvii Pg 8
    Jer. vii. 29, 30.

    And again in like manner does Jeremiah speak: “I set watchmen over you; hearken to the sound of the trumpet; and they said, We will not hearken. Therefore have the Gentiles heard, and they who feed the flocks in them.”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 9
    See Ps. xcvi. (xcv. in LXX.) 7, 8; and comp. xxix. (xxviii. in LXX.) 1, 2.

    For that it is not by earthly sacrifices, but by spiritual, that offering is to be made to God, we thus read, as it is written, An heart contribulate and humbled is a victim for God;”1204

    1204


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 9
    See Ps. xcvi. (xcv. in LXX.) 7, 8; and comp. xxix. (xxviii. in LXX.) 1, 2.

    For that it is not by earthly sacrifices, but by spiritual, that offering is to be made to God, we thus read, as it is written, An heart contribulate and humbled is a victim for God;”1204

    1204


    Anf-01 ii.ii.viii Pg 6
    Isa. i. 16–20.

    Desiring, therefore, that all His beloved should be partakers of repentance, He has, by His almighty will, established [these declarations].


    Anf-01 viii.ii.lxi Pg 4
    Isa. i. 16–20.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vi Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.x Pg 15.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 66
    Isa. i. 20.

    Whence we prove that the sword was Christ, by not hearing whom they perished; who, again, in the Psalm, demands of the Father their dispersion, saying, “Disperse them in Thy power;”1443

    1443


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiii Pg 10
    Isa. i. 20.

    has proved that it was Christ, for rebellion against whom they have perished. In the fifty-eighth Psalm He demands of the Father their dispersion:  “Scatter them in Thy power.”3424

    3424


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    They will have it, moreover, that he spoke of the second Tetrad, the offspring of the first, in this way—by naming an abyss and darkness, in which were also water, and the Spirit moving upon the water. Then, proceeding to mention the Decad, he names light, day, night, the firmament, the evening, the morning, dry land, sea, plants, and, in the tenth place, trees. Thus, by means of these ten names, he indicated the ten Æons. The power of the Duodecad, again, was shadowed forth by him thus:—He names the sun, moon, stars, seasons, years, whales, fishes, reptiles, birds, quadrupeds, wild beasts, and after all these, in the twelfth place, man. Thus they teach that the Triacontad was spoken of through Moses by the Spirit. Moreover, man also, being formed after the image of the power above, had in himself that ability which flows from the one source. This ability was seated in the region of the brain, from which four faculties proceed, after the image of the Tetrad above, and these are called: the first, sight, the second, hearing, the third, smell, and the fourth,2881

    2881 One of the senses was thus capriciously cancelled by these heretics.

    taste. And they say that the Ogdoad is indicated by man in this way: that he possesses two ears, the like number of eyes, also two nostrils, and a twofold taste, namely, of bitter and sweet. Moreover, they teach that the whole man contains the entire image of the Triacontad as follows: In his hands, by means of his fingers, he bears the Decad; and in his whole body the Duodecad, inasmuch as his body is divided into twelve members; for they portion that out, as the body of Truth is divided by them—a point of which we have already spoken.2882

    2882 See above, chap. xiv. 2.

    But the Ogdoad, as being unspeakable and invisible, is understood as hidden in the viscera.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvi Pg 11
    Gen. i. 2.

    Whose kingdom shall I wish to come—his, of whom I never heard as the king of glory; or His, in whose hand are even the hearts of kings? Who shall give me my daily4537

    4537


    Anf-03 v.v.xxiii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    For he resolves6350

    6350 Redigit in.

    the word earth into Matter, because that which is made out of it is the earth.  And to the word was he gives the same direction, as if it pointed to what had always existed unbegotten and unmade. It was without form, moreover, and void, because he will have Matter to have existed shapeless and confused, and without the finish of a maker’s hand.6351

    6351 Inconditam: we have combined the two senses of the word.

    Now these opinions of his I will refute singly; but first I wish to say to him, by way of general answer: We are of opinion that Matter is pointed at in these terms. But yet does the Scripture intimate that, because Matter was in existence before all, anything of like condition6352

    6352 Tale aliquid.

    was even formed out of it? Nothing of the kind. Matter might have had existence, if it so pleased—or rather if Hermogenes so pleased. It might, I say, have existed, and yet God might not have made anything out of it, either as it was unsuitable to Him to have required the aid of anything, or at least because He is not shown to have made anything out of Matter. Its existence must therefore be without a cause, you will say. Oh, no! certainly6353

    6353 Plane: ironical.

    not without cause. For even if the world were not made out of it, yet a heresy has been hatched there from; and a specially impudent one too, because it is not Matter which has produced the heresy, but the heresy has rather made Matter itself.


    Anf-03 v.v.xxv Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    Of course, if I were to ask, to which of the two earths the name earth is best suited,6361

    6361 Quæ cui nomen terræ accommodare debeat. This is literally a double question, asking about the fitness of the name, and to which earth it is best adapted.

    I shall be told that the earth which was made derived the appellation from that of which it was made, on the ground that it is more likely that the offspring should get its name from the original, than the original from the offspring. This being the case, another question presents itself to us, whether it is right and proper that this earth which God made should have derived its name from that out of which He made it? For I find from Hermogenes and the rest of the Materialist heretics,6362

    6362 He means those who have gone wrong on the eternity of matter.

    that while the one earth was indeed “without form, and void,” this one of ours obtained from God in an equal degree6363

    6363 Proinde.

    both form, and beauty, and symmetry; and therefore that the earth which was created was a different thing from that out of which it was created. Now, having become a different thing, it could not possibly have shared with the other in its name, after it had declined from its condition. If earth was the proper name of the (original) Matter, this world of ours, which is not Matter, because it has become another thing, is unfit to bear the name of earth, seeing that that name belongs to something else, and is a stranger to its nature. But (you will tell me) Matter which has undergone creation, that is, our earth, had with its original a community of name no less than of kind. By no means. For although the pitcher is formed out of the clay, I shall no longer call it clay, but a pitcher; so likewise, although electrum6364

    6364 A mixed metal, of the colour of amber.

    is compounded of gold and silver, I shall yet not call it either gold or silver, but electrum. When there is a departure from the nature of any thing, there is likewise a relinquishment of its name—with a propriety which is alike demanded by the designation and the condition. How great a change indeed from the condition of that earth, which is Matter, has come over this earth of ours, is plain even from the fact that the latter has received this testimony to its goodness in Genesis, “And God saw that it was good;”6365

    6365


    Anf-03 v.v.xxx Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    as if these blended6427

    6427 Confusæ.

    substances, presented us with arguments for his massive pile of Matter.6428

    6428 Massalis illius molis.

    Now, so discriminating an enumeration of certain and distinct elements (as we have in this passage), which severally designates “darkness,” “the deep,” “the Spirit of God,” “the waters,” forbids the inference that anything confused or (from such confusion) uncertain is meant. Still more, when He ascribed to them their own places,6429

    6429 Situs.

    darkness on the face of the deep,” “the Spirit upon the face of the waters,” He repudiated all confusion in the substances; and by demonstrating their separate position,6430

    6430 Dispositionem.

    He demonstrated also their distinction.  Most absurd, indeed, would it be that Matter, which is introduced to our view as “without form,” should have its “formless” condition maintained by so many words indicative of form,6431

    6431 Tot formarum vocabulis.

    without any intimation of what that confused body6432

    6432 Corpus confusionis.

    is, which must of course be supposed to be unique,6433

    6433 Unicum.

    since it is without form.6434

    6434 Informe.

    For that which is without form is uniform; but even6435

    6435 Autem.

    that which is without form, when it is blended together6436

    6436 Confusum.

    from various component parts,6437

    6437 Ex varietate.

    must necessarily have one outward appearance;6438

    6438 Unam speciem.

    and it has not any appearance, until it has the one appearance (which comes) from many parts combined.6439

    6439 Unam ex multis speciem.

    Now Matter either had those specific parts6440

    6440 Istas species.

    within itself, from the words indicative of which it had to be understood—I mean “darkness,” and “the deep,” and “the Spirit,” and “the waters”—or it had them not. If it had them, how is it introduced as being “without form?”6441

    6441 Non habens formas.

    If it had them not, how does it become known?6442

    6442 Agnoscitur.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 8
    De spiritu. This shows that Tertullian took the spirit of Gen. i. 2 in the inferior sense.

    also Amos says, “He that strengtheneth the thunder6462

    6462 So also the Septuagint.

    , and createth the wind, and declareth His Christ6463

    6463 So also the Septuagint.

    unto men;”6464

    6464


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 19
    Gen. i. 2.

    refers to Matter, as indeed do all those other Scriptures here and there,6473

    6473 In disperso.

    which demonstrate that the separate parts were made out of Matter. It must follow, then,6474

    6474 Ergo: Tertullian’s answer.

    that as earth consisted of earth, so also depth consisted of depth, and darkness of darkness, and the wind and waters of wind and waters. And, as we said above,6475

    6475 Ch. xxx., towards the end.

    Matter could not have been without form, since it had specific parts, which were formed out of it—although as separate things6476

    6476 Ut et aliæ.

    —unless, indeed, they were not separate, but were the very same with those out of which they came. For it is really impossible that those specific things, which are set forth under the same names, should have been diverse; because in that case6477

    6477 Jam.

    the operation of God might seem to be useless,6478

    6478 Otiosa.

    if it made things which existed already; since that alone would be a creation,6479

    6479 Generatio: creation in the highest sense of matter issuing from the maker. Another reading has “generosiora essent,” for our “generatio sola esset,” meaning that, “those things would be nobler which had not been made,” which is obviously quite opposed to Tertullian’s argument.

    when things came into being, which had not been (previously) made. Therefore, to conclude, either Moses then pointed to Matter when he wrote the words: “And darkness was on the face of the deep, and the spirit of God moved on the face of the waters;” or else, inasmuch as these specific parts of creation are afterwards shown in other passages to have been made by God, they ought to have been with equal explicitness6480

    6480 Æque.

    shown to have been made out of the Matter which, according to you, Moses had previously mentioned;6481

    6481 Præmiserat.

    or else, finally, if Moses pointed to those specific parts, and not to Matter, I want to know where Matter has been pointed out at all.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 40
    1 Kings xix. 11, 12.

    For by such means was the prophet—very indignant, because of the transgression of the people and the slaughter of the prophets—both taught to act in a more gentle manner; and the Lord’s advent as a man was pointed out, that it should be subsequent to that law which was given by Moses, mild and tranquil, in which He would neither break the bruised reed, nor quench the smoking flax.4093

    4093


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxxi Pg 3
    1 Kings xix. 11, 12.

    But these things pious men must understand in a higher sense with profound and meditative insight. But Plato, not attending to the words with the suitable insight, said that God exists in a fiery substance.


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 31.2


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 31.3


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxvii Pg 8
    Jer. vii. 29, 30.

    And again in like manner does Jeremiah speak: “I set watchmen over you; hearken to the sound of the trumpet; and they said, We will not hearken. Therefore have the Gentiles heard, and they who feed the flocks in them.”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 9
    See Ps. xcvi. (xcv. in LXX.) 7, 8; and comp. xxix. (xxviii. in LXX.) 1, 2.

    For that it is not by earthly sacrifices, but by spiritual, that offering is to be made to God, we thus read, as it is written, An heart contribulate and humbled is a victim for God;”1204

    1204


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 9
    See Ps. xcvi. (xcv. in LXX.) 7, 8; and comp. xxix. (xxviii. in LXX.) 1, 2.

    For that it is not by earthly sacrifices, but by spiritual, that offering is to be made to God, we thus read, as it is written, An heart contribulate and humbled is a victim for God;”1204

    1204


    Anf-01 ii.ii.viii Pg 6
    Isa. i. 16–20.

    Desiring, therefore, that all His beloved should be partakers of repentance, He has, by His almighty will, established [these declarations].


    Anf-01 viii.ii.lxi Pg 4
    Isa. i. 16–20.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vi Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.x Pg 15.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 66
    Isa. i. 20.

    Whence we prove that the sword was Christ, by not hearing whom they perished; who, again, in the Psalm, demands of the Father their dispersion, saying, “Disperse them in Thy power;”1443

    1443


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiii Pg 10
    Isa. i. 20.

    has proved that it was Christ, for rebellion against whom they have perished. In the fifty-eighth Psalm He demands of the Father their dispersion:  “Scatter them in Thy power.”3424

    3424


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xlii Pg 13
    Jer. v. 8.

    And Isaiah, when preaching in Judea, and reasoning with Israel, termed them “rulers of Sodom” and “people of Gomorrah;”4446

    4446


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 20.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.x Pg 12.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 238.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 247.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.iii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxvi Pg 10
    Jer. ix. 2. [A “remote dwelling-place” rather (σταθμὸν ἔσχατον according to LXX.) to square with the argument.]

    in order that both the sower and the reaper may rejoice together in the kingdom of Christ, who is present with all those who were from the beginning approved by God, who granted them His Word to be present with them.4148

    4148 [The touching words which conclude the former paragraph are illustrated by the noble sentence which begins this paragraph. The childlike spirit of these Fathers recognises Christ everywhere, in the Old Testament, prefigured by countless images and tokens in paternal and legal (ceremonial) forms.]



    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-01 vi.ii.ix Pg 4
    Jer. iv. 4.

    And again He says, “Hear, O Israel, for these things saith the Lord thy God.”1551

    1551


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 11
    Jer. iv. 3, 4. In Eng. ver., “break up your fallow ground;” but comp. de Pu. c. vi. ad init.

    and in another place he says, “Behold, days shall come, saith the Lord, and I will draw up, for the house of Judah and for the house of Jacob,1171

    1171 So Tertullian. In Jer. ibid.Israel and…Judah.”

    a new testament; not such as I once gave their fathers in the day wherein I led them out from the land of Egypt.”1172

    1172


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.i Pg 27
    Altered version of Jer. iv. 3, 4.

    And in another passage: “Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, that I will make a new covenant with the house of Jacob, and with the house of Judah; not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day when I arrested their dispensation, in order to bring them out of the land of Egypt.”3502

    3502


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iv Pg 41
    Jer. iv. 4.

    as Moses likewise had enjoined, “Circumcise your hard hearts5360

    5360


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xx Pg 11
    Jer. iv. 4.

    It is this circumcision, therefore, and this renewal, which the apostle insisted on, when he forbade those ancient ceremonies concerning which their very founder announced that they were one day to cease; thus by Hosea: “I will also cause all her mirth to cease, her feast-days, her new moons, and her Sabbaths, and all her solemn feasts.”2562

    2562


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiii Pg 26
    Jer. iv. 4.

    and even of Moses: “Circumcise, therefore, the hardness of your heart,”5809

    5809


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 138


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxvii Pg 8
    Jer. vii. 29, 30.

    And again in like manner does Jeremiah speak: “I set watchmen over you; hearken to the sound of the trumpet; and they said, We will not hearken. Therefore have the Gentiles heard, and they who feed the flocks in them.”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 9
    See Ps. xcvi. (xcv. in LXX.) 7, 8; and comp. xxix. (xxviii. in LXX.) 1, 2.

    For that it is not by earthly sacrifices, but by spiritual, that offering is to be made to God, we thus read, as it is written, An heart contribulate and humbled is a victim for God;”1204

    1204


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiii Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxiv Pg 0


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 9
    See Ps. xcvi. (xcv. in LXX.) 7, 8; and comp. xxix. (xxviii. in LXX.) 1, 2.

    For that it is not by earthly sacrifices, but by spiritual, that offering is to be made to God, we thus read, as it is written, An heart contribulate and humbled is a victim for God;”1204

    1204


    Anf-01 ii.ii.viii Pg 6
    Isa. i. 16–20.

    Desiring, therefore, that all His beloved should be partakers of repentance, He has, by His almighty will, established [these declarations].


    Anf-01 viii.ii.lxi Pg 4
    Isa. i. 16–20.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vi Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.x Pg 15.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 66
    Isa. i. 20.

    Whence we prove that the sword was Christ, by not hearing whom they perished; who, again, in the Psalm, demands of the Father their dispersion, saying, “Disperse them in Thy power;”1443

    1443


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiii Pg 10
    Isa. i. 20.

    has proved that it was Christ, for rebellion against whom they have perished. In the fifty-eighth Psalm He demands of the Father their dispersion:  “Scatter them in Thy power.”3424

    3424


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    They will have it, moreover, that he spoke of the second Tetrad, the offspring of the first, in this way—by naming an abyss and darkness, in which were also water, and the Spirit moving upon the water. Then, proceeding to mention the Decad, he names light, day, night, the firmament, the evening, the morning, dry land, sea, plants, and, in the tenth place, trees. Thus, by means of these ten names, he indicated the ten Æons. The power of the Duodecad, again, was shadowed forth by him thus:—He names the sun, moon, stars, seasons, years, whales, fishes, reptiles, birds, quadrupeds, wild beasts, and after all these, in the twelfth place, man. Thus they teach that the Triacontad was spoken of through Moses by the Spirit. Moreover, man also, being formed after the image of the power above, had in himself that ability which flows from the one source. This ability was seated in the region of the brain, from which four faculties proceed, after the image of the Tetrad above, and these are called: the first, sight, the second, hearing, the third, smell, and the fourth,2881

    2881 One of the senses was thus capriciously cancelled by these heretics.

    taste. And they say that the Ogdoad is indicated by man in this way: that he possesses two ears, the like number of eyes, also two nostrils, and a twofold taste, namely, of bitter and sweet. Moreover, they teach that the whole man contains the entire image of the Triacontad as follows: In his hands, by means of his fingers, he bears the Decad; and in his whole body the Duodecad, inasmuch as his body is divided into twelve members; for they portion that out, as the body of Truth is divided by them—a point of which we have already spoken.2882

    2882 See above, chap. xiv. 2.

    But the Ogdoad, as being unspeakable and invisible, is understood as hidden in the viscera.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvi Pg 11
    Gen. i. 2.

    Whose kingdom shall I wish to come—his, of whom I never heard as the king of glory; or His, in whose hand are even the hearts of kings? Who shall give me my daily4537

    4537


    Anf-03 v.v.xxiii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    For he resolves6350

    6350 Redigit in.

    the word earth into Matter, because that which is made out of it is the earth.  And to the word was he gives the same direction, as if it pointed to what had always existed unbegotten and unmade. It was without form, moreover, and void, because he will have Matter to have existed shapeless and confused, and without the finish of a maker’s hand.6351

    6351 Inconditam: we have combined the two senses of the word.

    Now these opinions of his I will refute singly; but first I wish to say to him, by way of general answer: We are of opinion that Matter is pointed at in these terms. But yet does the Scripture intimate that, because Matter was in existence before all, anything of like condition6352

    6352 Tale aliquid.

    was even formed out of it? Nothing of the kind. Matter might have had existence, if it so pleased—or rather if Hermogenes so pleased. It might, I say, have existed, and yet God might not have made anything out of it, either as it was unsuitable to Him to have required the aid of anything, or at least because He is not shown to have made anything out of Matter. Its existence must therefore be without a cause, you will say. Oh, no! certainly6353

    6353 Plane: ironical.

    not without cause. For even if the world were not made out of it, yet a heresy has been hatched there from; and a specially impudent one too, because it is not Matter which has produced the heresy, but the heresy has rather made Matter itself.


    Anf-03 v.v.xxv Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    Of course, if I were to ask, to which of the two earths the name earth is best suited,6361

    6361 Quæ cui nomen terræ accommodare debeat. This is literally a double question, asking about the fitness of the name, and to which earth it is best adapted.

    I shall be told that the earth which was made derived the appellation from that of which it was made, on the ground that it is more likely that the offspring should get its name from the original, than the original from the offspring. This being the case, another question presents itself to us, whether it is right and proper that this earth which God made should have derived its name from that out of which He made it? For I find from Hermogenes and the rest of the Materialist heretics,6362

    6362 He means those who have gone wrong on the eternity of matter.

    that while the one earth was indeed “without form, and void,” this one of ours obtained from God in an equal degree6363

    6363 Proinde.

    both form, and beauty, and symmetry; and therefore that the earth which was created was a different thing from that out of which it was created. Now, having become a different thing, it could not possibly have shared with the other in its name, after it had declined from its condition. If earth was the proper name of the (original) Matter, this world of ours, which is not Matter, because it has become another thing, is unfit to bear the name of earth, seeing that that name belongs to something else, and is a stranger to its nature. But (you will tell me) Matter which has undergone creation, that is, our earth, had with its original a community of name no less than of kind. By no means. For although the pitcher is formed out of the clay, I shall no longer call it clay, but a pitcher; so likewise, although electrum6364

    6364 A mixed metal, of the colour of amber.

    is compounded of gold and silver, I shall yet not call it either gold or silver, but electrum. When there is a departure from the nature of any thing, there is likewise a relinquishment of its name—with a propriety which is alike demanded by the designation and the condition. How great a change indeed from the condition of that earth, which is Matter, has come over this earth of ours, is plain even from the fact that the latter has received this testimony to its goodness in Genesis, “And God saw that it was good;”6365

    6365


    Anf-03 v.v.xxx Pg 3
    Gen. i. 2.

    as if these blended6427

    6427 Confusæ.

    substances, presented us with arguments for his massive pile of Matter.6428

    6428 Massalis illius molis.

    Now, so discriminating an enumeration of certain and distinct elements (as we have in this passage), which severally designates “darkness,” “the deep,” “the Spirit of God,” “the waters,” forbids the inference that anything confused or (from such confusion) uncertain is meant. Still more, when He ascribed to them their own places,6429

    6429 Situs.

    darkness on the face of the deep,” “the Spirit upon the face of the waters,” He repudiated all confusion in the substances; and by demonstrating their separate position,6430

    6430 Dispositionem.

    He demonstrated also their distinction.  Most absurd, indeed, would it be that Matter, which is introduced to our view as “without form,” should have its “formless” condition maintained by so many words indicative of form,6431

    6431 Tot formarum vocabulis.

    without any intimation of what that confused body6432

    6432 Corpus confusionis.

    is, which must of course be supposed to be unique,6433

    6433 Unicum.

    since it is without form.6434

    6434 Informe.

    For that which is without form is uniform; but even6435

    6435 Autem.

    that which is without form, when it is blended together6436

    6436 Confusum.

    from various component parts,6437

    6437 Ex varietate.

    must necessarily have one outward appearance;6438

    6438 Unam speciem.

    and it has not any appearance, until it has the one appearance (which comes) from many parts combined.6439

    6439 Unam ex multis speciem.

    Now Matter either had those specific parts6440

    6440 Istas species.

    within itself, from the words indicative of which it had to be understood—I mean “darkness,” and “the deep,” and “the Spirit,” and “the waters”—or it had them not. If it had them, how is it introduced as being “without form?”6441

    6441 Non habens formas.

    If it had them not, how does it become known?6442

    6442 Agnoscitur.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 8
    De spiritu. This shows that Tertullian took the spirit of Gen. i. 2 in the inferior sense.

    also Amos says, “He that strengtheneth the thunder6462

    6462 So also the Septuagint.

    , and createth the wind, and declareth His Christ6463

    6463 So also the Septuagint.

    unto men;”6464

    6464


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 19
    Gen. i. 2.

    refers to Matter, as indeed do all those other Scriptures here and there,6473

    6473 In disperso.

    which demonstrate that the separate parts were made out of Matter. It must follow, then,6474

    6474 Ergo: Tertullian’s answer.

    that as earth consisted of earth, so also depth consisted of depth, and darkness of darkness, and the wind and waters of wind and waters. And, as we said above,6475

    6475 Ch. xxx., towards the end.

    Matter could not have been without form, since it had specific parts, which were formed out of it—although as separate things6476

    6476 Ut et aliæ.

    —unless, indeed, they were not separate, but were the very same with those out of which they came. For it is really impossible that those specific things, which are set forth under the same names, should have been diverse; because in that case6477

    6477 Jam.

    the operation of God might seem to be useless,6478

    6478 Otiosa.

    if it made things which existed already; since that alone would be a creation,6479

    6479 Generatio: creation in the highest sense of matter issuing from the maker. Another reading has “generosiora essent,” for our “generatio sola esset,” meaning that, “those things would be nobler which had not been made,” which is obviously quite opposed to Tertullian’s argument.

    when things came into being, which had not been (previously) made. Therefore, to conclude, either Moses then pointed to Matter when he wrote the words: “And darkness was on the face of the deep, and the spirit of God moved on the face of the waters;” or else, inasmuch as these specific parts of creation are afterwards shown in other passages to have been made by God, they ought to have been with equal explicitness6480

    6480 Æque.

    shown to have been made out of the Matter which, according to you, Moses had previously mentioned;6481

    6481 Præmiserat.

    or else, finally, if Moses pointed to those specific parts, and not to Matter, I want to know where Matter has been pointed out at all.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xlii Pg 13
    Jer. v. 8.

    And Isaiah, when preaching in Judea, and reasoning with Israel, termed them “rulers of Sodom” and “people of Gomorrah;”4446

    4446


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 20.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.x Pg 12.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 238.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 247.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.iii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxvi Pg 10
    Jer. ix. 2. [A “remote dwelling-place” rather (σταθμὸν ἔσχατον according to LXX.) to square with the argument.]

    in order that both the sower and the reaper may rejoice together in the kingdom of Christ, who is present with all those who were from the beginning approved by God, who granted them His Word to be present with them.4148

    4148 [The touching words which conclude the former paragraph are illustrated by the noble sentence which begins this paragraph. The childlike spirit of these Fathers recognises Christ everywhere, in the Old Testament, prefigured by countless images and tokens in paternal and legal (ceremonial) forms.]



    Anf-01 ix.vi.xlii Pg 13
    Jer. v. 8.

    And Isaiah, when preaching in Judea, and reasoning with Israel, termed them “rulers of Sodom” and “people of Gomorrah;”4446

    4446


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 20.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.x Pg 12.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 238.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 247.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.iii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxvi Pg 10
    Jer. ix. 2. [A “remote dwelling-place” rather (σταθμὸν ἔσχατον according to LXX.) to square with the argument.]

    in order that both the sower and the reaper may rejoice together in the kingdom of Christ, who is present with all those who were from the beginning approved by God, who granted them His Word to be present with them.4148

    4148 [The touching words which conclude the former paragraph are illustrated by the noble sentence which begins this paragraph. The childlike spirit of these Fathers recognises Christ everywhere, in the Old Testament, prefigured by countless images and tokens in paternal and legal (ceremonial) forms.]



    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 24

    VERSE 	(19) - 

    :1-5; 34:4-10 Jer 4:23-28 Na 1:5 Hab 3:6 Mt 24:3 Re 20:11


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET