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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Isaiah 24:7


    CHAPTERS: Isaiah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Isaiah 24:7

    πενθησει οινος 3631 πενθησει αμπελος 288 στεναξουσιν παντες 3956 οι 3588 ευφραινομενοι την 3588 ψυχην 5590

    Douay Rheims Bible

    The vintage hath mourned, the vine hath languished away, all the merryhearted have sighed.

    King James Bible - Isaiah 24:7

    The new
    wine mourneth, the vine languisheth, all the merryhearted do sigh.

    World English Bible

    The new
    wine mourns. The vine languishes. All the merry-hearted sigh.

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Isaiah 24:7

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxvii Pg 4
    Isa. iii. 16.

    For they are all gone aside,’ He exclaims, ‘they are all become useless. There is none that understands, there is not so much as one. With their tongues they have practised deceit, their throat is an open sepulchre, the poison of asps is under their lips, destruction and misery are in their paths, and the way of peace they have not known.’2018

    2018


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xi Pg 75.2


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 37
    Isa. iii. 16–24.

    just as in another passage He utters His threats against the proud and noble: “Hell hath enlarged herself, and opened her mouth, and down to it shall descend the illustrious, and the great, and the rich (this shall be Christ’s ‘woe to the rich’); and man4017

    4017 Homo: “the mean man,” A.V.

    shall be humbled,” even he that exalts himself with riches; “and the mighty man4018

    4018 Vir.

    shall be dishonoured,” even he who is mighty from his wealth.4019

    4019


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.i Pg 20.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xix Pg 3
    Isa. xxxii. 9, 10. Quoted as usual, from the LXX.: Γυναῖκες πλούσιαι ἀνάστητε, καὶ ἀκούσατε τῆς φωνῆς μου· θυγατέρες ἐν ἐλπίδι εἰσακούσατε λόγους μου. ῾Ημέρας ἐνιαυτοῦ μνείαν ποιήσασθε ἐν ὀδύνῃ μετ᾽ ἐλπίδος.

    —that He might prove4185

    4185 Ostenderet.

    them first as disciples, and then as assistants and helpers: “Daughters, hear my words in hope; this day of the year cherish the memory of, in labour with hope.” For it was “in labour” that they followed Him, and “with hope” did they minister to Him.  On the subject of parables, let it suffice that it has been once for all shown that this kind of language4186

    4186 Eloquii.

    was with equal distinctness promised by the Creator. But there is that direct mode of His speaking4187

    4187 Pronunciatio.

    to the people—“Ye shall hear with the ear, but ye shall not understand”4188

    4188


    Anf-01 ix.vi.v Pg 9
    Isa. i. 8.

    And when shall these things be left behind? Is it not when the fruit shall be taken away, and the leaves alone shall be left, which now have no power of producing fruit?


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 7
    Isa. i. 7, 8. See c. xiii. sub fin.

    Why so?  Because the subsequent discourse of the prophet reproaches them, saying, “Sons have I begotten and upraised, but they have reprobated me;”1167

    1167


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 65
    See Isa. i. 7, 8; 4.

    So, again, we find a conditional threat of the sword: “If ye shall have been unwilling, and shall not have been obedient, the glaive shall eat you up.”1442

    1442


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiii Pg 8
    Isa. i. 7, 8.

    ever since the time when “Israel acknowledged not the Lord, and the people understood Him not, but forsook Him, and provoked the Holy One of Israel unto anger.”3422

    3422


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 42
    When the vintage was gathered, Isa. i. 8.

    See, then, whether there be not here a confirmation of the prophet’s word, when he rebukes that ignorance of man toward God which continued to the days of the Son of man. For it was on this account that he inserted the clause that the Father is known by him to whom the Son has revealed Him, because it was even He who was announced as set by the Father to be a light to the Gentiles, who of course required to be enlightened concerning God, as well as to Israel, even by imparting to it a fuller knowledge of God. Arguments, therefore, will be of no use for belief in the rival god which may be suitable4505

    4505 Quæ competere possunt.

    for the Creator, because it is only such as are unfit for the Creator which will be able to advance belief in His rival.  If you look also into the next words, “Blessed are the eyes which see the things which ye see, for I tell you that prophets have not seen the things which ye see,”4506

    4506


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxi Pg 32
    Isa. i. 8.

    since the nation rejected the latest invitation to Christ. (Now, I ask,) after going through all this course of the Creator’s dispensation and prophecies, what there is in it which can possibly be assigned to him who has done all his work at one hasty stroke,4756

    4756 Semel.

    and possesses neither the Creator’s4757

    4757 This is probably the meaning of a very involved sentence: “Quid ex hoc ordine secundum dispensationem et prædicationes Creatoris recensendo competit illi, cujus (“Creatoris”—Oehler) nec ordinem habet nec dispositionem ad parabolæ conspirationem qui totum opus semel facit?”

    course nor His dispensation in harmony with the parable? Or, again in what will consist his first invitation,4758

    4758 “By the fathers.” See above.

    and what his admonition4759

    4759 “By the prophets.” See also above.

    at the second stage? Some at first would surely decline; others afterwards must have accepted.”4760

    4760 An obscure sentence, which thus runs in the original: “Ante debent alii excusare, postea alii convenisse.”

    But now he comes to invite both parties promiscuously out of the city,4761

    4761 The Jews.

    out of the hedges,4762

    4762 The Gentiles.

    contrary to the drift4763

    4763 Speculum.

    of the parable. It is impossible for him now to condemn as scorners of his invitation4764

    4764 Fastidiosos.

    those whom he has never yet invited, and whom he is approaching with so much earnestness. If, however, he condemns them beforehand as about to reject his call, then beforehand he also predicts4765

    4765 Portendit.

    the election of the Gentiles in their stead.  Certainly4766

    4766 Plane: This is a Marcionite position (Oehler).

    he means to come the second time for the very purpose of preaching to the heathen. But even if he does mean to come again, I imagine it will not be with the intention of any longer inviting guests, but of giving to them their places.  Meanwhile, you who interpret the call to this supper as an invitation to a heavenly banquet of spiritual satiety and pleasure, must remember that the earthly promises also of wine and oil and corn, and even of the city, are equally employed by the Creator as figures of spiritual things.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 32
    Isa. i. 8.

    With what constancy has He also, in Psalm xxx., laboured to present to us the very Christ! He calls with a loud voice to the Father, “Into Thine hands I commend my spirit,”5151

    5151


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxvii Pg 4
    Isa. iii. 16.

    For they are all gone aside,’ He exclaims, ‘they are all become useless. There is none that understands, there is not so much as one. With their tongues they have practised deceit, their throat is an open sepulchre, the poison of asps is under their lips, destruction and misery are in their paths, and the way of peace they have not known.’2018

    2018


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xi Pg 75.2


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 37
    Isa. iii. 16–24.

    just as in another passage He utters His threats against the proud and noble: “Hell hath enlarged herself, and opened her mouth, and down to it shall descend the illustrious, and the great, and the rich (this shall be Christ’s ‘woe to the rich’); and man4017

    4017 Homo: “the mean man,” A.V.

    shall be humbled,” even he that exalts himself with riches; “and the mighty man4018

    4018 Vir.

    shall be dishonoured,” even he who is mighty from his wealth.4019

    4019


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xi Pg 75.2


    Npnf-201 iii.xiii.ii Pg 15


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 47.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 20.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.iii.xi Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 126.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.xv Pg 6
    i.e., as Rigaltius (referred to by Oehler), explains, after the two visions of angels who appeared to him and said, “Arise and eat.” See 1 Kings xix. 4–13. [It was the fourth, but our author having mentioned two, inadvertently calls it the third, referring to the “still small voice,” in which Elijah saw His manifestation.]

    For where God is, there too is His foster-child, namely Patience. When God’s Spirit descends, then Patience accompanies Him indivisibly. If we do not give admission to her together with the Spirit, will (He) always tarry with us? Nay, I know not whether He would remain any longer. Without His companion and handmaid, He must of necessity be straitened in every place and at every time. Whatever blow His enemy may inflict He will be unable to endure alone, being without the instrumental means of enduring.


    Anf-03 v.x.vii Pg 6
    Zech. xiii. 9.

    Certainly by the means of torture which fires and punishments supply, by the testing martyrdoms of faith. The apostle also knows what kind of God he has ascribed to us, when he writes: “If God spared not His own Son, but gave Him up for us, how did He not with Him also give us all things?”8261

    8261


    Anf-02 ii.iv.vii Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xviii Pg 36
    Luke vii. 26, 27, and Mal. iii. 1–; 3.

    He graciously4171

    4171 Eleganter.

    adduced the prophecy in the superior sense of the alternative mentioned by the perplexed John, in order that, by affirming that His own precursor was already come in the person of John, He might quench the doubt4172

    4172 Scrupulum.

    which lurked in his question: “Art thou He that should come, or look we for another?”  Now that the forerunner had fulfilled his mission, and the way of the Lord was prepared, He ought now to be acknowledged as that (Christ) for whom the forerunner had made ready the way. That forerunner was indeed “greater than all of women born;”4173

    4173


    Anf-01 ix.iv.ix Pg 12
    Ps. cxv. 3.

    But the things established are distinct from Him who has established them, and what have been made from Him who has made them. For He is Himself uncreated, both without beginning and end, and lacking nothing. He is Himself sufficient for Himself; and still further, He grants to all others this very thing, existence; but the things which have been made by Him have received a beginning. But whatever things had a beginning, and are liable to dissolution, and are subject to and stand in need of Him who made them, must necessarily in all respects have a different term [applied to them], even by those who have but a moderate capacity for discerning such things; so that He indeed who made all things can alone, together with His Word, properly be termed God and Lord: but the things which have been made cannot have this term applied to them, neither should they justly assume that appellation which belongs to the Creator.


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 11
    Gen. vi. 6.

    tempting Abraham, as if ignorant of what was in man; offended with persons, and then reconciled to them; and whatever other (weaknesses and imperfections) the heretics lay hold of (in their assumptions) as unworthy of God, in order to discredit the Creator, not considering that these circumstances are suitable enough for the Son, who was one day to experience even human sufferings—hunger and thirst, and tears, and actual birth and real death, and in respect of such a dispensation “made by the Father a little less than the angels.”7970

    7970


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 58
    Comp. Isa. v. 2 in LXX. and Lowth.

    —the clouds being celestial benefits, which were commanded not to be forthcoming to the house of Israel; for it “had borne thorns”—whereof that house of Israel had wrought a crown for Christ—and not “righteousness, but a clamour,”—the clamour whereby it had extorted His surrender to the cross.1435

    1435


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 59
    Comp. Isa. v. 6, 7, with Matt. xxvii. 20–25, Mark xv. 8–15, Luke xxiii. 13–25, John xix. 12–16.

    And thus, the former gifts of grace being withdrawn, “the law and the prophets were until John,”1436

    1436


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiii Pg 5
    Isa. v. 6, 7.

    And so in this manner the law and the prophets were until John, but the dews of divine grace were withdrawn from the nation. After his time their madness still continued, and the name of the Lord was blasphemed by them, as saith the Scripture: “Because of you my name is continually blasphemed amongst the nations3419

    3419


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 56
    Isa. v. 7.

    (of oppression). The same God who had taught them to act as He commanded them,4705

    4705 Ex præcepto.

    was now requiring that they should act of their own accord.4706

    4706 Ex arbitrio.

    He who had sown the precept, was now pressing to an abundant harvest from it. But how absurd, that he should now be commanding them to judge righteously, who was destroying God the righteous Judge! For the Judge, who commits to prison, and allows no release out of it without the payment of “the very last mite,”4707

    4707


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-02 ii.iv.viii Pg 5.3


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvi Pg 19.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 11
    Gen. vi. 6.

    tempting Abraham, as if ignorant of what was in man; offended with persons, and then reconciled to them; and whatever other (weaknesses and imperfections) the heretics lay hold of (in their assumptions) as unworthy of God, in order to discredit the Creator, not considering that these circumstances are suitable enough for the Son, who was one day to experience even human sufferings—hunger and thirst, and tears, and actual birth and real death, and in respect of such a dispensation “made by the Father a little less than the angels.”7970

    7970


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 58
    Comp. Isa. v. 2 in LXX. and Lowth.

    —the clouds being celestial benefits, which were commanded not to be forthcoming to the house of Israel; for it “had borne thorns”—whereof that house of Israel had wrought a crown for Christ—and not “righteousness, but a clamour,”—the clamour whereby it had extorted His surrender to the cross.1435

    1435


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 59
    Comp. Isa. v. 6, 7, with Matt. xxvii. 20–25, Mark xv. 8–15, Luke xxiii. 13–25, John xix. 12–16.

    And thus, the former gifts of grace being withdrawn, “the law and the prophets were until John,”1436

    1436


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiii Pg 5
    Isa. v. 6, 7.

    And so in this manner the law and the prophets were until John, but the dews of divine grace were withdrawn from the nation. After his time their madness still continued, and the name of the Lord was blasphemed by them, as saith the Scripture: “Because of you my name is continually blasphemed amongst the nations3419

    3419


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 56
    Isa. v. 7.

    (of oppression). The same God who had taught them to act as He commanded them,4705

    4705 Ex præcepto.

    was now requiring that they should act of their own accord.4706

    4706 Ex arbitrio.

    He who had sown the precept, was now pressing to an abundant harvest from it. But how absurd, that he should now be commanding them to judge righteously, who was destroying God the righteous Judge! For the Judge, who commits to prison, and allows no release out of it without the payment of “the very last mite,”4707

    4707


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 58
    Comp. Isa. v. 2 in LXX. and Lowth.

    —the clouds being celestial benefits, which were commanded not to be forthcoming to the house of Israel; for it “had borne thorns”—whereof that house of Israel had wrought a crown for Christ—and not “righteousness, but a clamour,”—the clamour whereby it had extorted His surrender to the cross.1435

    1435


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 55
    Tertullian calls by a proper name the vineyard which Isaiah (in his chap. v.) designates “the vineyard of the Lord of hosts,” and interprets to be “the house of Israel” (ver. 7). The designation comes from ver. 2, where the original clause ירשֹ והע[טָיִּוַ is translated in the Septuagint, Καὶ ἐφύτευσα ἄμπελον Σωρήκ. Tertullian is most frequently in close agreement with the LXX.

    that when “He looked for righteousness therefrom, there was only a cry4704

    4704


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 55.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.ii Pg 18


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xix Pg 40
    Deut. xxxii. 4.

    But if, not having been made flesh, He did appear as if flesh, His work was not a true one. But what He did appear, that He also was: God recapitulated in Himself the ancient formation of man, that He might kill sin, deprive death of its power, and vivify man; and therefore His works are true.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvi Pg 12.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 55.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.ii Pg 18


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 19.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iv Pg 7


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxx Pg 9
    Ex. xx. 5; Isa. xlv. 5, 6.

    Such are the falsehoods which these people invent.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.viii Pg 37.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 20.1


    Npnf-201 iii.xii.xi Pg 25


    Anf-01 ii.ii.iv Pg 7
    Num. xvi. 33.

    Through envy, David underwent the hatred not only of foreigners, but was also persecuted by Saul king of Israel.24

    24


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxvii Pg 14
    Num. xvi. 33.

    <index subject1="Separatists to be shunned" title="497" id="ix.vi.xxvii-p14.2"/>But those who cleave asunder, and separate the unity of the Church, [shall] receive from God the same punishment as Jeroboam did.4161

    4161


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xiii Pg 4
    Ps. cix. 8.

    —thus leading to the completion of the apostles, according to the words spoken by David. Again, when the Holy Ghost had descended upon the disciples, that they all might prophesy and speak with tongues, and some mocked them, as if drunken with new wine, Peter said that they were not drunken, for it was the third hour of the day; but that this was what had been spoken by the prophet: “It shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh, and they shall prophesy.”3469

    3469


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxi Pg 4
    Acts i. 20, from Ps. cix. 8.

    They ought therefore to maintain that the twelfth Æon was cast out of the Pleroma, and that another was produced, or sent forth to fill her place; if, that is to say, she is pointed at in Judas. Moreover, they tell us that it was the Æon herself who suffered, but Judas was the betrayer, [and not the sufferer.] Even they themselves acknowledge that it was the suffering Christ, and not Judas, who came to [the endurance of] passion. How, then, could Judas, the betrayer of Him who had to suffer for our salvation, be the type and image of that Æon who suffered?


    Anf-03 v.iii.xx Pg 5
    Ps. cix. 8; comp. with Acts i. 15–20.

    chosen Matthias by lot as the twelfth, into the place of Judas, they obtained the promised power of the Holy Ghost for the gift of miracles and of utterance; and after first bearing witness to the faith in Jesus Christ throughout Judæa, and founding churches (there), they next went forth into the world and preached the same doctrine of the same faith to the nations. They then in like manner founded churches in every city, from which all the other churches, one after another, derived the tradition of the faith,2054

    2054 Traducem fidei.

    and the seeds of doctrine, and are every day deriving them,2055

    2055 Mutuantur “borrowing.”

    that they may become churches. Indeed, it is on this account only that they will be able to deem themselves apostolic, as being the offspring of apostolic churches.  Every sort of thing2056

    2056 Omne genus.

    must necessarily revert to its original for its classification.2057

    2057 Censeatur or, “for its origin.”

    Therefore the churches, although they are so many and so great, comprise but the one primitive church, (founded) by the apostles, from which they all (spring).  In this way all are primitive, and all are apostolic, whilst they are all proved to be one, in (unbroken) unity, by their peaceful communion,2058

    2058 Communicatio pacis.

    and title of brotherhood, and bond2059

    2059


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiii Pg 23
    Jer. xvii. 10, in sense but not in letter.

    he magnified the power of that God who declared Himself to be as a lamp, “searching the reins and the heart.”4793

    4793


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xiv Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vii Pg 5
    Ps. vii. 9.

    From Him also shall “praise be had by every man,”5475

    5475


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xii Pg 5.1


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xv Pg 7
    Ps. cxxxix. 23.

    “Why think ye evil in your hearts?”1588

    1588


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.vii Pg 40.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 4.3


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 9
    Literally, “in hope of His faith.”

    <index subject1="Purification" title="139" id="vi.ii.iv-p9.1"/>Now, being desirous to write many things to you, not as your teacher, but as becometh one who loves you, I have taken care not to fail to write to you from what I myself possess, with a view to your purification.1476

    1476 The Greek is here incorrect and unintelligible; and as the Latin omits the clause, our translation is merely conjectural. Hilgenfeld’s text, if we give a somewhat peculiar meaning to ἐλλιπεῖν, may be translated: “but as it is becoming in one who loves you not to fail in giving you what we have, I, though the very offscouring of you, have been eager to write to you.”

    We take earnest1477

    1477


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiii Pg 23
    Jer. xvii. 10, in sense but not in letter.

    he magnified the power of that God who declared Himself to be as a lamp, “searching the reins and the heart.”4793

    4793


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xiv Pg 3.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vii Pg 5
    Ps. vii. 9.

    From Him also shall “praise be had by every man,”5475

    5475


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xii Pg 5.1


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xv Pg 7
    Ps. cxxxix. 23.

    “Why think ye evil in your hearts?”1588

    1588


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xx Pg 15
    Ps. lxix. 21.

    that He was despised among the people, and humbled Himself even to death and that He is the holy Lord, the Wonderful, the Counsellor, the Beautiful in appearance, and the Mighty God,3678

    3678


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 78
    Ps. lxix. 21.

    and that He should be forsaken by His friends and those nearest to Him;4318

    4318


    Anf-03 iv.ix.x Pg 10
    Ps. lxix. 21 (lxviii. 5 in LXX.).

    “Upon my vesture they did cast (the) lot;”1321

    1321


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 18
    Ps. xxii. 16, 17 (xxi. 17, 18, in LXX.); and lxix. 21 (lxviii. 22 in LXX.).

    These things David did not suffer, so as to seem justly to have spoken of himself; but the Christ who was crucified.  Moreover, the “hands and feet,” are not “exterminated,”1397

    1397 i.e., displaced, dislocated.

    except His who is suspended on a “tree.”  Whence, again, David said that “the Lord would reign from the tree:”1398

    1398 See c. x. above.

    for elsewhere, too, the prophet predicts the fruit of this “tree,” saying “The earth hath given her blessings,”1399

    1399


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xv Pg 7
    Ps. xii. 3–5.



    Anf-01 v.iii.ix Pg 14
    Ps. vi., Ps. xii. (inscrip.). [N.B.—The reference is to the title of these two psalms, as rendered by the LXX. Εἰς τὸ τέλος ὑπὲρ τῆς ὀγδόης.]

    on which our life both sprang up again, and the victory over death was obtained in Christ, whom the children of perdition, the enemies of the Saviour, deny, “whose god is their belly, who mind earthly things,”692

    692


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.v Pg 28.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.



    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.


    *marg:


    Anf-01 vi.ii.iv Pg 5
    Dan. vii. 7, 8, also very inaccurately cited.

    Ye ought therefore to understand. And this also I further beg of you, as being one of you, and loving you both individually and collectively more than my own soul, to take heed now to yourselves, and not to be like some, adding largely to your sins, and saying, “The covenant is both theirs and ours.”1472

    1472 We here follow the Latin text in preference to the Greek, which reads merely, “the covenant is ours.” What follows seems to show the correctness of the Latin, as the author proceeds to deny that the Jews had any further interest in the promises.

    But they thus finally lost it, after Moses had already received it. For the Scripture saith, “And Moses was fasting in the mount forty days and forty nights, and received the covenant from the Lord, tables of stone written with the finger of the hand of the Lord;”1473

    1473


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxvi Pg 5
    Dan. vii. 8, etc.

    Then, further on, in the interpretation of the vision, there was said to him: “The fourth beast shall be the fourth kingdom upon earth, which shall excel all other kingdoms, and devour the whole earth, and tread it down, and cut it in pieces. And its ten horns are ten kings which shall arise; and after them shall arise another, who shall surpass in evil deeds all that were before him, and shall overthrow three kings; and he shall speak words against the most high God, and wear out the saints of the most high God, and shall purpose to change times and laws; and [everything] shall be given into his hand until a time of times and a half time,”4666

    4666


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xvi Pg 7
    Comp. Isa. v., Jer. xxv.; but the words do not occur in Scripture.

    And it so happened as the Lord had spoken. <index subject1="Temple" subject2="the true" title="147" id="vi.ii.xvi-p7.3"/>Let us inquire, then, if there still is a temple of God. There is—where He himself declared He would make and finish it. For it is written, “And it shall come to pass, when the week is completed, the temple of God shall be built in glory in the name of the Lord.”1678

    1678


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 5
    Comp. Isa. xvi. 1, 2.

    And again saith the prophet, “I will go before thee and make level the mountains, and will break the brazen gates, and bruise in pieces the iron bars; and I will give thee the secret,1595

    1595 Literally, “dark.” Cod. Sin. has, “of darkness.”

    hidden, invisible treasures, that they may know that I am the Lord God.”1596

    1596


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxii Pg 2
    Amos v. 18 to end, Amos vi. 1–7.

    And again by Jeremiah: ‘Collect your flesh, and sacrifices, and eat: for concerning neither sacrifices nor libations did I command your fathers in the day in which I took them by the hand to lead them out of Egypt.’2002

    2002


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxv Pg 34
    Amos vi. 1.

    vouchsafing now to restore that very region, purposely requests the men “to go and show themselves to the priests,” because these were to be found only there where the temple was; submitting4892

    4892 Subiciens: or “subjecting.”

    the Samaritan to the Jew, inasmuch as “salvation was of the Jews,”4893

    4893


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 45
    Amos vi. 1–6.

    Therefore, even if I could do nothing else than show that the Creator dissuades men from riches, without at the same time first condemning the rich, in the very same terms in which Christ also did, no one could doubt that, from the same authority, there was added a commination against the rich in that woe of Christ, from whom also had first proceeded the dissuasion against the material sin of these persons, that is, their riches. For such commination is the necessary sequel to such a dissuasive.  He inflicts a woe also on “the full, because they shall hunger; on those too which laugh now, because they shall mourn.”4025

    4025


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.ii Pg 42.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 45
    Amos vi. 1–6.

    Therefore, even if I could do nothing else than show that the Creator dissuades men from riches, without at the same time first condemning the rich, in the very same terms in which Christ also did, no one could doubt that, from the same authority, there was added a commination against the rich in that woe of Christ, from whom also had first proceeded the dissuasion against the material sin of these persons, that is, their riches. For such commination is the necessary sequel to such a dissuasive.  He inflicts a woe also on “the full, because they shall hunger; on those too which laugh now, because they shall mourn.”4025

    4025


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxv Pg 12
    Isa. vi. 11.

    Then Daniel also says this very thing: “And the kingdom and dominion, and the greatness of those under the heaven, is given to the saints of the Most High God, whose kingdom is everlasting, and all dominions shall serve and obey Him.”4757

    4757


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxvi Pg 2
    Isa. vi. 11.

    “For, behold,” says Isaiah, “the day of the Lord cometh past remedy, full of fury and wrath, to lay waste the city of the earth, and to root sinners out of it.”4766

    4766


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 24

    VERSE 	(7) - 

    Isa 16:8,10; 32:9-13 Ho 9:1,2 Joe 1:10-12


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET