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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Isaiah 3:16


    CHAPTERS: Isaiah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

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    King James Bible - Isaiah 3:16

    Moreover the LORD saith, Because the daughters of Zion are haughty, and walk with stretched forth necks and wanton eyes, walking and mincing as they go, and making a tinkling with their feet:

    World English Bible

    Moreover Yahweh said, "Because the daughters of Zion are haughty, and walk with outstretched necks and flirting
    eyes, walking to trip as they go, jingling ornaments on their feet;

    Douay-Rheims - Isaiah 3:16

    And the Lord said: Because the daughters of Sion are haughty, and have walked with stretched out necks, and wanton glances of their
    eyes, and made a noise as they walked with their feet and moved in a set pace:

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Moreover the LORD saith, Because the daughters of Zion are haughty, and walk with extended necks and wanton
    eyes, walking and mincing as they go, and making a tinkling with their feet:

    Original Hebrew

    ויאמר
    559 יהוה 3069 יען 3282 כי 3588 גבהו 1361 בנות 1323 ציון 6726 ותלכנה 1980 נטוות 5186 גרון 1627 ומשׂקרות 8265 עינים 5869 הלוך 1980 וטפף 2952 תלכנה 1980 וברגליהם 7272 תעכסנה׃ 5913

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (16) -
    Isa 1:8; 4:4 Mt 21:5 Lu 23:28

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 3:16

    ¶ Asimismo dice el SEOR: Por cuanto las hijas de Sion se ensoberbecen, y andan con cuello erguido y los ojos descompuestos; y cuando andan, van como danzando, y haciendo son con los pies;

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Isaiah 3:16

    Verse 16. And
    wanton eyes "And falsely setting off their eyes with paint"] Hebrew, falsifying their eyes. I take this to be the true meaning and literal rendering of the word; from rq shakar. The Masoretes have pointed it, as if it were from rq sakar, a different word. This arose, as I imagine, from their supposing that the word was the same with rqs sakar, Chaldee, "intueri, innuere oculis; " or that it had an affinity with the noun arqys sikra, which the Chaldeans, or the rabbins at least, use for stibium, the mineral which was commonly used in colouring the eyes. See Jarchi's comment on the place. Though the colouring of the eyes with stibium be not particularly here expressed, yet I suppose it to be implied; and so the Chaldee paraphrase explains it; stibio linitis oculis, "with eyes dressed with stibium." This fashion seems to have prevailed very generally among the Eastern people in ancient times; and they retain the very same to this day.

    Pietro delta Valle, giving a description of his wife, an Assyrian lady born in Mesopotamia, and educated at Bagdad, whom he married in that country, (Viaggi, Tom. I., Lettera 17,) says, "Her eyelashes, which are long, and, according to the custom of the East, dressed with stibium, (as we often read in the Holy Scriptures of the Hebrew women of old, Jer. iv. 30; Ezekiel xxiii. 40; and in Xenophon, of Astyages the grandfather of Cyrus, and of the Medes of that time, Cyropaed. lib. i.,) give a dark, and at the same time a majestic, shade to the eyes."Great eyes," says Sandys, Travels, p. 67, speaking of the Turkish women, "they have in principal repute; and of those the blacker they be the more amiable; insomuch that they put between the eyelids and the eye a certain black powder with a fine long pencil, made of a mineral, brought from the kingdom of Fez, and called Alcohole; which by the not disagreeable staining of the lids doth better set forth the whiteness of the eye; and though it be troublesome for a time, yet it comforteth the sight, and repelleth ill humours." Vis ejus (stibii) astringe ac refrigerare, principalis autem circa oculos; namque ideo etiam plerique Platyophthalmon id appellavere, quoniam in calliblepharis mulierum dilatat oculos; et fluxiones inhibet oculorum exulcerationesque. "It is astringent in its virtue, and refrigerant, and to be chiefly employed about the eyes, and it is called Platyophthalmon, for being put into those ointments with which women beautify their eyes, it dilates them, removes defluxions, and heals any ulcerations that may be about the eyelids."-Pliny, Nat. Hist. xxxiii. 6.

    Ille supercilium madida fuligine tactum Obliqua producit acu, pingitque trementes Attollens oculos Juv. Sat. ii. 93.

    One his eyebrows, tinged with black soot, Lengthens with an oblique bodkin, and paints, Lifting up his winking eyes.

    "But none of those [Moorish] ladies," says Dr. Shaw, Travels, p. 294, fol., "take themselves to be completely dressed, till they have tinged the hair and edges of their eyelids with alkahol, the powder of lead ore. This operation is performed by dipping first into the powder a small wooden bodkin of the thickness of a quill; and then drawing it afterwards through the eyelids, over the ball of the eye." Ezekiel, chap. xxiii. 40, uses the same word in the form of a verb, yn[ tljk cachalt eynayik, "thou didst dress thine eyes with alcahol;" which the Septuagint render estibizou touv, ofqalmouv sou, "thou didst dress thine eyes with stibium;" just as they do when the word wp phuch is employed: compare 2 Kings ix. 30; Jer. iv. 30. They supposed, therefore, that wp phuch and ljk cachal, or in the Arabic form, alcahol, meant the same thing; and probably the mineral used of old for this purpose was the same that is used now; which Dr. Shaw (ibid. note) says is "a rich lead ore, pounded into an impalpable powder." Alcoholados; the word twrqm meshakkeroth in this place is thus rendered in an old Spanish translation. - Sanctius. See also Russell's Nat. Hist. of Aleppo, p. 102.

    The following inventory, as one may call it, of the wardrobe of a Hebrew lady, must, from its antiquity, and the nature of the subject, have been very obscure even to the most ancient interpreters which we have of it; and from its obscurity must have been also peculiarly liable to the mistakes of transcribers. However, it is rather matter of curiosity than of importance; and is indeed, upon the whole, more intelligible and less corrupted than one might have reasonably expected. Clemens Alexandrinus, Paedag. lib. ii., c. 12, and Julius Pollux, lib. vii., c. 22, have each of them preserved from a comedy of Aristophanes, now lost, a similar catalogue of the several parts of the dress and ornaments of a Grecian lady; which, though much more capable of illustration from other writers, though of later date, and quoted and transmitted down to us by two different authors, yet seems to be much less intelligible, and considerably more corrupted, than this passage of Isaiah. Salmasius has endeavoured, by comparing the two quotations, and by much critical conjecture and learned disquisition, to restore the true reading, and to explain the particulars; with what success, I leave to the determination of the learned reader, whose curiosity shall lead him to compare the passage of the comedian with this of the prophet, and to examine the critic's learned labours upon it. Exercit. Plinian, p. 1148; or see Clem. Ales. as cited above, edit. Potter, where the passage, as corrected by Salmasius, is given.

    Nich. Guel. Schroederus, professor of oriental languages in the University of Marpurg, has published a very learned and judicious treatise upon this passage of Isaiah. The title of it is, "Commentarius Philologico-Criti cus de Vestitu Mulierum Hebraearum ad Iesai iii. ver. 16-24. Lugd. Bat. 1745." 4to. As I think no one has handled this subject with so much judgment and ability as this author, I have for the most part followed him, in giving the explanation of the several terms denoting the different parts of dress, of which this passage consists; signifying the reasons of my dissent, where he does not give me full satisfaction.

    Bishop Lowth's translation of these verses is the following:- 18. In that day will the Lord take from them the ornaments, Of the feet-rings, and the net-works, and the crescents; 19. The pendants, and the bracelets, and the veils; 20. The tires, and the fetters, and the zones, And the perfume-boxes, and the amulets; 21. The rings, and the jewels of the nostrils; 22. The embroidered robes, and the tunics, And the cloaks, and the little purses, 23. The transparent garments, and the fine linen vests, And the turbans, and the mantles.

    24. And there shall be instead of perfume, a putrid ulcer; And instead of well-girt raiment, rags; And instead of high- dressed hair, baldness; And instead of a zone, a girdle of sackcloth; And sun-burnt skin, instead of beauty.

    The daughters of Zion-walk] What is meant by these several kinds of action and articles of dress cannot be well conjectured. How our ancestors understood them will appear from the following, which is the translation of these verses in my old MS. Bible:- 16. The doughteris of Syon wenteh with strught out necks, and ib beckes (winking) of eegen, geeden and flappeden with hondis for joye, and geeden: and with theire feet in curyous goying geeden;-17. the Lord schall fully make ballid the top of the boughtris of Syon: and the Lord the her of hem schal naken. And for ournemente schal be schenschip.

    18. In that day, the Lord schal don awey the ournement of Schoon and hoosis: 19. and beegis, and brochis, and armeerclis, and mytris; 20. and coombis, and rybanys and reversis at the hemmys, and oynment boris and ereringis; 21. and ryngis and jemmys in the frount hongynge; 22. and chaunginge clothis, and litil pallis, and scheetis, and prynys; 23. and scheweris, and neche hercheuys, and flyetis, and roketis; 24. and ther schal be for swot smel, stynke, and for gyrdil, a litl coord; and for crisp her, ballidnesse; and for brest boond and heyr.

    Some of these things are hard to be understood, though I think this version as good as that of the very learned bishop: but there is little doubt that articles of clothing and dress bore these names in the fourteenth century.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    The calamities about to come upon the land. (Is. 3:1-9) The wickednes of the people. (Is. 3:10-15) The distress of the proud, luxurious wome of Zion. (Is. 3:16-26)

    Is. 3:1-9 God was about to deprive Judah of every stay and support. The city and the land were to be made desolate, because their words an works had been rebellious against the Lord; even at his holy temple. I men do not stay themselves upon God, he will soon remove all othe supports, and then they must sink. Christ is the Bread of life and the Water of life; if he be our Stay, we shall find that is a good part no to be taken away, John 6:27. Here note, 1. That the condition of sinners is exceedingly woful. 2. It is the soul that is damaged by sin 3. Whatever evil befals sinners, be sure that they bring it of themselves.

    Is. 3:10-15 The rule was certain; however there might be nationa prosperity or trouble, it would be well with the righteous and ill with the wicked. Blessed be God, there is abundant encouragement to the righteous to trust in him, and for sinners to repent and return to him It was time for the Lord to show his might. He will call men to strict account for all the wealth and power intrusted to and abused by them. If it is sinful to disregard the necessities of the poor, ho odious and wicked a part do they act, who bring men into poverty, an then oppress them!

    Is. 3:16-26 The prophet reproves and warns the daughters of Zion of the sufferings coming upon them. Let them know that God notices the foll and vanity of proud women, even of their dress. The punishment threatened answered the sin. Loathsome diseases often are the jus punishment of pride. It is not material to ask what sort of ornament they wore; many of these things, if they had not been in fashion, woul have been ridiculed then as now. Their fashions differed much from those of our times, but human nature is the same. Wasting time an money, to the neglect of piety, charity, and even of justice, displeas the Lord. Many professors at the present day, seem to think there is n harm in worldly finery; but were it not a great evil, would the Holy Spirit have taught the prophet to expose it so fully? The Jews being overcome, Jerusalem would be levelled with the ground; which i represented under the idea of a desolate female seated upon the earth And when the Romans had destroyed Jerusalem, they struck a medal, of which was represented a woman sitting on the ground in a posture of grief. If sin be harboured within the walls, lamentation and mournin are near the gates __________________________________________________________________


    Original Hebrew

    ויאמר 559 יהוה 3069 יען 3282 כי 3588 גבהו 1361 בנות 1323 ציון 6726 ותלכנה 1980 נטוות 5186 גרון 1627 ומשׂקרות 8265 עינים 5869 הלוך 1980 וטפף 2952 תלכנה 1980 וברגליהם 7272 תעכסנה׃ 5913


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

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