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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Isaiah 18:1


    CHAPTERS: Isaiah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

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    King James Bible - Isaiah 18:1

    Woe to the land shadowing with wings, which is beyond the rivers of Ethiopia:

    World English Bible

    Ah, the
    land of the rustling of wings, which is beyond the rivers of Ethiopia;

    Douay-Rheims - Isaiah 18:1

    WOE to the
    land, the winged cymbal, which is beyond the rivers of Ethiopia,

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Woe to the
    land shadowing with wings, which is beyond the rivers of Cush:

    Original Hebrew

    הוי
    1945 ארץ 776 צלצל 6767 כנפים 3671 אשׁר 834 מעבר 5676 לנהרי 5104 כושׁ׃ 3568

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    Isa 20:3-6; 30:2,3; 31:1

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 18:1

    ¶ ¡Ay de la tierra que hace sombra con las alas, que est tras los ríos de Etiopía!

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Isaiah 18:1

    Verse 1. Wo to the
    land] ra ywh hoi arets! This interjection should be translated ho! for it is properly a particle of calling: Ho, land! Attend! Give ear! Shadowing with wings "The winged cymbal] ypnk lxlx tsiltsal kenaphayim. I adopt this as the most probable of the many interpretations that have been given of these words. It is Bochart's: see Phaleg, iv. 2. The Egyptian sistrum is expressed by a periphrasis; the Hebrews had no name for it in their language, not having in use the instrument itself. The cymbal they had was an instrument in its use and sound not much unlike the sistrum; and to distinguish it from the sistrum, they called it the cymbal with wings. The cymbal was a round hollow piece of metal, which, being struck against another, gave a ringing sound: the sistrum was a round instrument, consisting of a broad rim of metal, through which from side to side ran several loose laminae or small rods of metal, which being shaken, gave a like sound. These, projecting on each side, had somewhat the appearance of wings; or might be very properly expressed by the same word which the Hebrews used for wings, or for the extremity, or a part of any thing projecting. The sistrum is given in a medal of Adrian, as the proper attribute of Egypt. See Addison on Medals, Series iii. No. 4; where the figure of it may be seen. The frame of the sistrum was in shape rather like the ancient lyre; it was not round.

    If we translate shadowing with wings, it may allude to the multitude of its vessels, whose sails may be represented under the notion of wings. The second verse seems to support this interpretation. Vessels of bulrushes, amg gome, or rather the flag papyrus, so much celebrated as the substance on which people wrote in ancient times, and from which our paper is denominated. The sails might have been made of this flag: but whole canoes were constructed from it. Mat sails are used to the present day in China. The Vulgate fully understood the meaning of the word, and has accordingly translated, in vasis papyri, "in vessels of papyrus." Reshi vesselis. - Old MS. Bib. This interpretation does not please Bp. Lowth, and for his dissent he gives the following reasons:- In opposition to other interpretations of these words which have prevailed, it may be briefly observed that lxlx tsiltsel is never used to signify shadow, nor is Pnk canaph applied to the sails of ships. If, therefore, the words are rightly interpreted the winged cymbal, meaning the sistrum, Egypt must be the country to which the prophecy is addressed. And upon this hypothesis the version and explanation must proceed. I farther suppose, that the prophecy was delivered before Sennacherib's return from his Egyptian expedition, which took up three years; and that it was designed to give to the Jews, and perhaps likewise to the Egyptians, an intimation of God's counsels in regard to the destruction of their great and powerful enemy.

    Which is beyond the rivers of Ethiopia "Which borders on the rivers of Cush"] What are the rivers of Cush? whether the eastern branches of the lower Nile, the boundary of Egypt towards Arabia, or the parts of the upper Nile towards Ethiopia, it is not easy to determine. The word rb[m meeber signifies either on this side or on the farther side: I have made use of the same kind of ambiguous expression in the translation.


    Matthew Henry Commentary
    God's care for his people; and the increase of the church.

    This chapter is one of the most obscure in Scripture, though more of i probably was understood by those for whose use it was first intended than by us now. Swift messengers are sent by water to a nation marke by Providence, and measured out, trodden under foot. God's people ar trampled on; but whoever thinks to swallow them up, finds they are cas down, yet not deserted, not destroyed. All the dwellers on earth mus watch the motions of the Divine Providence, and wait upon the directions of the Divine will. God gives assurance to his prophet, an by him to be given to his people. Zion is his rest for ever, and he will look after it. He will suit to their case the comforts an refreshments he provides for them; they will be acceptable, becaus seasonable. He will reckon with his and their enemies; and as God' people are protected at all seasons of the year, so their enemies ar exposed at all seasons. A tribute of praise should be brought to God from all this. What is offered to God, must be offered in the way he has appointed; and we may expect him to meet us where he records his name. Thus shall the nations of the earth be convinced that Jehovah is the God, and Israel is his people, and shall unite in presentin spiritual sacrifices to his glory. Happy are those who take warning by his judgment on others, and hasten to join him and his people. Whateve land or people may be intended, we are here taught not to think tha God takes no care of his church, and has no respect to the affairs of men, because he permits the wicked to triumph for a season. He has wis reasons for so doing, which we cannot now understand, but which wil appear at the great day of his coming, when he will bring every wor into judgment, and reward every man according to his works __________________________________________________________________


    Original Hebrew

    הוי 1945 ארץ 776 צלצל 6767 כנפים 3671 אשׁר 834 מעבר 5676 לנהרי 5104 כושׁ׃ 3568


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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