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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Job 20:19


    CHAPTERS: Job 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Job 20:19

    πολλων 4183 γαρ 1063 αδυνατων 102 οικους 3624 εθλασεν διαιταν δε 1161 ηρπασεν 726 5656 και 2532 ουκ 3756 εστησεν 2476 5656

    Douay Rheims Bible

    Because he broke in and stripped the poor: he hath violently taken away a house which he did not build.

    King James Bible - Job 20:19

    Because he hath oppressed and hath forsaken the poor; because he hath violently taken away an house which he builded not;

    World English Bible

    For he has oppressed and forsaken the poor. He has violently taken away a house, and he shall not build it up.

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Job 20:19

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxix Pg 6
    Job iv. 16–18, Job xv. 15, Job iv. 19–21, Job v. 1–5.


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 19


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xi Pg 13
    Or rather in Deuteronomy. See xxviii. 65 sqq.

    saying, “Ye shall be ejected from the land into which ye shall enter; and in those nations ye shall not be able to rest:  and there shall be instability of the print1375

    1375 Or, “sole.”

    of thy foot: and God shall give thee a wearying heart, and a pining soul, and failing eyes, that they see not: and thy life shall hang on the tree1376

    1376


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xvi Pg 35
    Deut. xv. 7, 8.

    Loans are not usually given, except to such as ask for them. On this subject of lending,4068

    4068 De fenore.

    however, more hereafter.4069

    4069 Below, in the next chapter.

    Now, should any one wish to argue that the Creator’s precepts extended only to a man’s brethren, but Christ’s to all that ask, so as to make the latter a new and different precept, (I have to reply) that one rule only can be made out of those principles, which show the law of the Creator to be repeated in Christ.4070

    4070 This obscure passage runs thus: “Immo unum erit ex his per quæ lex Creatoris erit in Christo.”

    For that is not a different thing which Christ enjoined to be done towards all men, from that which the Creator prescribed in favour of a man’s brethren.  For although that is a greater charity, which is shown to strangers, it is yet not preferable to that4071

    4071 Prior ea.

    which was previously due to one’s neighbours.  For what man will be able to bestow the love (which proceeds from knowledge of character,4072

    4072 This is the idea, apparently, of Tertullian’s question: “Quis enim poterit diligere extraneos?” But a different turn is given to the sense in the older reading of the passage: Quis enim non diligens proximos poterit diligere extraneos? “For who that loveth not his neighbours will be able to love strangers?” The inserted words, however, were inserted conjecturally by Fulvius Ursinus without ms. authority.

    upon strangers? Since, however, the second step4073

    4073 Gradus.

    in charity is towards strangers, while the first is towards one’s neighbours, the second step will belong to him to whom the first also belongs, more fitly than the second will belong to him who owned no first.4074

    4074 Cujus non extitit primus.

    Accordingly, the Creator, when following the course of nature, taught in the first instance kindness to neighbours,4075

    4075 In proximos.

    intending afterwards to enjoin it towards strangers; and when following the method of His dispensation, He limited charity first to the Jews, but afterwards extended it to the whole race of mankind. So long, therefore, as the mystery of His government4076

    4076 Sacramentum.

    was confined to Israel, He properly commanded that pity should be shown only to a man’s brethren; but when Christ had given to Him “the Gentiles for His heritage, and the ends of the earth for His possession,” then began to be accomplished what was said by Hosea: “Ye are not my people, who were my people; ye have not obtained mercy, who once obtained mercy4077

    4077


    Anf-03 iv.ix.i Pg 12
    This promise may be said to have been given “to Abraham,” because (of course) he was still living at the time; as we see by comparing Gen. xxi. 5 with xxv. 7 and 26. See, too, Heb. xi. 9.

    out of the womb of Rebecca “two peoples and two nations were about to proceed,”1131

    1131 Or, “nor did He make, by grace, a distinction.”

    —of course those of the Jews, that is, of Israel; and of the Gentiles, that is ours. Each, then, was called a people and a nation; lest, from the nuncupative appellation, any should dare to claim for himself the privilege of grace.  For God ordained “two peoples and two nations” as about to proceed out of the womb of one woman: nor did grace1132

    1132 Or, “nor did He make, by grace, a distinction.”

    make distinction in the nuncupative appellation, but in the order of birth; to the effect that, which ever was to be prior in proceeding from the womb, should be subjected to “the less,” that is, the posterior. For thus unto Rebecca did God speak: “Two nations are in thy womb, and two peoples shall be divided from thy bowels; and people shall overcome people, and the greater shall serve the less.”1133

    1133


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xiii Pg 3
    Gen. xxv. 21.

    Furthermore also, Rebecca went forth to inquire of the Lord; and the Lord said to her, “Two nations are in thy womb, and two peoples in thy belly; and the one people shall surpass the other, and the elder shall serve the younger.”1632

    1632


    Anf-03 iv.ix.i Pg 15
    See Gen. xxv. 21–23, especially in the LXX.; and comp. Rom. ix. 10–13.

    Accordingly, since the people or nation of the Jews is anterior in time, and “greater” through the grace of primary favour in the Law, whereas ours is understood to be “less” in the age of times, as having in the last era of the world1134

    1134 Sæculi.

    attained the knowledge of divine mercy:  beyond doubt, through the edict of the divine utterance, the prior and “greater” people—that is, the Jewish—must necessarily serve the “less;” and the “less” people—that is, the Christian—overcome the “greater.” For, withal, according to the memorial records of the divine Scriptures, the people of the Jews—that is, the more ancient—quite forsook God, and did degrading service to idols, and, abandoning the Divinity, was surrendered to images; while “the people” said to Aaron, “Make us gods to go before us.”1135

    1135


    Anf-01 viii.ii.liii Pg 2
    Isa. liv. 1.

    For all the Gentiles were “desolate” of the true God, serving the works of their hands; but the Jews and Samaritans, having the word of God delivered to them by the prophets, and always expecting the Christ, did not recognise Him when He came, except some few, of whom the Spirit of prophecy by Isaiah had predicted that they should be saved. He spoke as from their person: “Except the Lord had left us a seed, we should have been as Sodom and Gomorrah.”1880

    1880


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xi Pg 15
    Isa. liv. 1; Gal. iv. 27.

    For in reference to these points, and others of a like nature, the apostle exclaims: “Oh! the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God; how unsearchable are His judgments, and His ways past finding out!”2798

    2798


    Anf-02 vi.ii.i Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.vi Pg 10.1


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxv Pg 21
    Isa. liv. 11–14.

    And yet again does he say the same thing: “Behold, I make Jerusalem a rejoicing, and my people [a joy]; for the voice of weeping shall be no more heard in her, nor the voice of crying. Also there shall not be there any immature [one], nor an old man who does not fulfil his time: for the youth shall be of a hundred years; and the sinner shall die a hundred years old, yet shall be accursed. And they shall build houses, and inhabit them themselves; and shall plant vineyards, and eat the fruit of them themselves, and shall drink wine. And they shall not build, and others inhabit; neither shall they prepare the vineyard, and others eat. For as the days of the tree of life shall be the days of the people in thee; for the works of their hands shall endure.”4764

    4764


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 157


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 20.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xvii Pg 11
    Deut. xxiv. 12, 13.

    Clearer still is a former passage: “Thou shalt remit every debt which thy neighbour oweth thee; and of thy brother thou shalt not require it, because it is called the release of the Lord thy God.”4102

    4102


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 22.2


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 20.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xvi Pg 57
    Ezek. xviii. 7.

    That teaching was even then a sufficient inducement to me to do to others what I would that they should do unto me. Accordingly, when He uttered such denunciations as, “Thou shalt do no murder; thou shalt not commit adultery; thou shalt not steal; thou shalt not bear false witness,”4090

    4090


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xvii Pg 10
    Pignus reddes dati (i.e., fenoris) is his reading of a clause in Ezek. xviii. 16.

    —to him, certainly, who is incapable of repayment, because, as a matter of course, He would not anyhow prescribe the restoration of a pledge to one who was solvent. Much more clearly is it enjoined in Deuteronomy: “Thou shalt not sleep upon his pledge; thou shalt be sure to return to him his garment about sunset, and he shall sleep in his own garment.”4101

    4101


    Npnf-201 iii.xii.viii Pg 16


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxi Pg 4
    Ex. i. 13, 14.

    And with immense labour they built for them fenced cities, increasing the substance of these men throughout a long course of years, and by means of every species of slavery; while these [masters] were not only ungrateful towards them, but had in contemplation their utter annihilation. In what way, then, did [the Israelites] act unjustly, if out of many things they took a few, they who might have possessed much property had they not served them, and might have gone forth wealthy, while, in fact, by receiving only a very insignificant recompense for their heavy servitude, they went away poor? It is just as if any free man, being forcibly carried away by another, and serving him for many years, and increasing his substance, should be thought, when he ultimately obtains some support, to possess some small portion of his [master’s] property, but should in reality depart, having obtained only a little as the result of his own great labours, and out of vast possessions which have been acquired, and this should be made by any one a subject of accusation against him, as if he had not acted properly.4216

    4216 This perplexed sentence is pointed by Harvey interrogatively, but we prefer the above.

    He (the accuser) will rather appear as an unjust judge against him who had been forcibly carried away into slavery. Of this kind, then, are these men also, who charge the people with blame, because they appropriated a few things out of many, but who bring no charge against those who did not render them the recompense due to their fathers’ services; nay, but even reducing them to the most irksome slavery, obtained the highest profit from them. And [these objectors] allege that [the Israelites] acted dishonestly, because, forsooth, they took away for the recompense of their labours, as I have observed, unstamped gold and silver in a few vessels; while they say that they themselves (for let truth be spoken, although to some it may seem ridiculous) do act honestly, when they carry away in their girdles from the labours of others, coined gold, and silver, and brass, with Cæsar’s inscription and image upon it.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxi Pg 4
    Ex. i. 13, 14.

    And with immense labour they built for them fenced cities, increasing the substance of these men throughout a long course of years, and by means of every species of slavery; while these [masters] were not only ungrateful towards them, but had in contemplation their utter annihilation. In what way, then, did [the Israelites] act unjustly, if out of many things they took a few, they who might have possessed much property had they not served them, and might have gone forth wealthy, while, in fact, by receiving only a very insignificant recompense for their heavy servitude, they went away poor? It is just as if any free man, being forcibly carried away by another, and serving him for many years, and increasing his substance, should be thought, when he ultimately obtains some support, to possess some small portion of his [master’s] property, but should in reality depart, having obtained only a little as the result of his own great labours, and out of vast possessions which have been acquired, and this should be made by any one a subject of accusation against him, as if he had not acted properly.4216

    4216 This perplexed sentence is pointed by Harvey interrogatively, but we prefer the above.

    He (the accuser) will rather appear as an unjust judge against him who had been forcibly carried away into slavery. Of this kind, then, are these men also, who charge the people with blame, because they appropriated a few things out of many, but who bring no charge against those who did not render them the recompense due to their fathers’ services; nay, but even reducing them to the most irksome slavery, obtained the highest profit from them. And [these objectors] allege that [the Israelites] acted dishonestly, because, forsooth, they took away for the recompense of their labours, as I have observed, unstamped gold and silver in a few vessels; while they say that they themselves (for let truth be spoken, although to some it may seem ridiculous) do act honestly, when they carry away in their girdles from the labours of others, coined gold, and silver, and brass, with Cæsar’s inscription and image upon it.


    Anf-01 ii.ii.iv Pg 5
    Ex. ii. 14.

    On account of envy, Aaron and Miriam had to make their abode without the camp.22

    22


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lix Pg 3
    Ex. ii. 23.

    and so on until, ‘Go and gather the elders of Israel, and thou shalt say unto them, The Lord God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath appeared to me, saying, I am surely beholding you, and the things which have befallen you in Egypt.’ ”2163

    2163


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.viii Pg 48.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.xiv Pg 6
    Compare Ps. ii. 4.

    how was the evil one cut asunder,9173

    9173 i.e. with rage and disappointment.

    while Job with mighty equanimity kept scraping off9174

    9174


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vi Pg 34.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.iii Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 44
    Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11" id="v.iv.vi.vi-p44.1" parsed="|1Cor|3|19|3|20;|Job|5|13|0|0;|Ps|94|11|0|0" osisRef="Bible:1Cor.3.19-1Cor.3.20 Bible:Job.5.13 Bible:Ps.94.11">1 Cor. iii. 19, 20; Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11.

    For in general we may conclude for certain that he could not possibly have cited the authority of that God whom he was bound to destroy, since he would not teach for Him.5467

    5467 Si non illi doceret.

    “Therefore,” says he, “let no man glory in man;”5468

    5468


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 8
    1 Kings x. 1.

    she whom the Lord also referred to as one who should rise up in the judgment with the nations of those men who do hear His words, and do not believe in Him, and should condemn them, inasmuch as she submitted herself to the wisdom announced by the servant of God, while these men despised that wisdom which proceeded directly from the Son of God. For Solomon was a servant, but Christ is indeed the Son of God, and the Lord of Solomon. While, therefore, he served God without blame, and ministered to His dispensations, then was he glorified: but when he took wives from all nations, and permitted them to set up idols in Israel, the Scripture spake thus concerning him: “And King Solomon was a lover of women, and he took to himself foreign women; and it came to pass, when Solomon was old, his heart was not perfect with the Lord his God. And the foreign women turned away his heart after strange gods. And Solomon did evil in the sight of the Lord: he did not walk after the Lord, as did David his father. And the Lord was angry with Solomon; for his heart was not perfect with the Lord, as was the heart of David his father.”4181

    4181


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 9
    1 Kings xi. 1.

    The Scripture has thus sufficiently reproved him, as the presbyter remarked, in order that no flesh may glory in the sight of the Lord.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 9
    I am not acquainted with any such passage. Oehler refers to Isa. xlix. in his margin, but gives no verse, and omits to notice this passage of the present treatise in his index.

    Thus, therefore, before this temporal sabbath, there was withal an eternal sabbath foreshown and foretold; just as before the carnal circumcision there was withal a spiritual circumcision foreshown. In short, let them teach us, as we have already premised, that Adam observed the sabbath; or that Abel, when offering to God a holy victim, pleased Him by a religious reverence for the sabbath; or that Enoch, when translated, had been a keeper of the sabbath; or that Noah the ark-builder observed, on account of the deluge, an immense sabbath; or that Abraham, in observance of the sabbath, offered Isaac his son; or that Melchizedek in his priesthood received the law of the sabbath.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 14.1


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxxiii Pg 28
    See Bull’s Works, Vol. V., p. 381.

    I value it chiefly because it proves that the Greek Testament, elsewhere says, disjointedly, what is collected into 1 John v. 7. It is, therefore, Holy Scripture in substance, if not in the letter. What seems to me important, however, is the balance it gives to the whole context, and the defective character of the grammar and logic, if it be stricken out. In the Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate of the Old Testament we have a precisely similar case. Refer to Psa. xiii., alike in the Latin and the Greek, as compared with our English Version.8214

    8214


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxvi Pg 5
    Ps. i. 3.

    Again, the righteous is said to flourish like the palm-tree. God appeared from a tree to Abraham, as it is written, near the oak in Mamre. The people found seventy willows and twelve springs after crossing the Jordan.2290

    2290


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 11
    Ps. i. 3–6.

    Mark how He has described at once both the water and the cross. For these words imply, Blessed are they who, placing their trust in the cross, have gone down into the water; for, says He, they shall receive their reward in due time: then He declares, I will recompense them. But now He saith,1601

    1601 Cod. Sin. has, “what meaneth?”

    “Their leaves shall not fade.” This meaneth, that every word which proceedeth out of your mouth in faith and love shall tend to bring conversion and hope to many. Again, another prophet saith, “And the land of Jacob shall be extolled above every land.”1602

    1602


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 19.1


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 17
    Ps. i. 3.

    “He that hath clean hands and a pure heart, who hath not taken God’s name in vain, nor sworn deceitfully to his neighbour, he shall receive blessing from the Lord, and mercy from the God of his salvation.”2937

    2937


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 125.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 4
    Cod. Sin. has, “have dug a pit of death.” See Jer. ii. 12, 13.

    Is my holy hill Zion a desolate rock? For ye shall be as the fledglings of a bird, which fly away when the nest is removed.”1594


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxiv Pg 7
    Jer. ii. 13.



    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxl Pg 2
    Jer. ii. 13.

    But they are cisterns broken, and holding no water, which your own teachers have digged, as the Scripture also expressly asserts, ‘teaching for doctrines the commandments of men.’2483

    2483


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxv Pg 6
    Jer. ii. 13.

    out of earthly trenches, and drink putrid water out of the mire, fleeing from the faith of the Church lest they be convicted; and rejecting the Spirit, that they may not be instructed.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 23.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 32
    ὑδατος ζωῆς in the LXX. here (ed. Tischendorf, who quotes the Cod. Alex. as reading, however, ὑδατος ζῶντος). Comp. Rev. xxii. 1, 17, and xxi. 6; John vii. 37–39. (The reference, it will be seen, is still to Jer. ii. 10–13; but the writer has mixed up words of Amos therewith.)

    and they have digged for themselves worn-out tanks, which will not be able to contain water.” Undoubtedly, by not receiving Christ, the “fount of water of life,” they have begun to have “worn-out tanks,” that is, synagogues for the use of the “dispersions of the Gentiles,”1411

    1411


    Anf-01 ix.vi.vi Pg 10
    Ps. xlv. 16.

    Christ Himself, therefore, together with the Father, is the God of the living, who spake to Moses, and who was also manifested to the fathers.

    *margins


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xi Pg 20
    Isa. xii. 2.

    But as bringing salvation, thus: “God hath made known His salvation (salutare) in the sight of the heathen.”3412

    3412


    Anf-01 iv.ii.x Pg 7
    Isa. lii. 5.

    Teach, therefore, sobriety to all, and manifest it also in your own conduct.


    Anf-01 v.iv.viii Pg 4
    Isa. lii. 5.


    Anf-01 v.iv.viii Pg 14
    Isa. lii. 5.



    Anf-01 viii.iv.xvii Pg 2
    Isa. lii. 5.

    And: ‘Woe unto their soul! because they have devised an evil device against themselves, saying, Let us bind the righteous, for he is distasteful to us. Therefore they shall eat the fruit of their doings. Woe unto the wicked! evil shall be rendered to him according to the works of his hands.’ And again, in other words:1987

    1987


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xiv Pg 3
    Literally, “in a fat,” etc., [or, “in a rich”].

    and acceptable sacrifice, according as Thou, the ever-truthful458

    458 Literally, “the not false and true God.”

    God, hast foreordained, hast revealed beforehand to me, and now hast fulfilled. Wherefore also I praise Thee for all things, I bless Thee, I glorify Thee, along with the everlasting and heavenly Jesus Christ, Thy beloved Son, with whom, to Thee, and the Holy Ghost, be glory both now and to all coming ages. Amen.”459

    459


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 62
    See Isa. lii. 5; Ezek. xxxvi. 20, 23; Rom. ii. 24. (The passage in Isaiah in the LXX. agrees with Rom. ii. 24.)

    for it is from them that the infamy (attached to that name) began, and (was propagated during) the interval from Tiberius to Vespasian. And because they had committed these crimes, and had failed to understand that Christ “was to be found”1439

    1439


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxiii Pg 6
    Isa. lii. 5.

    (for from them did the blasphemy originate); neither in the interval from Tiberius to Vespasian did they learn repentance.3420

    3420 Compare Adv. Judæos, 13, p. 171, for a like statement.

    Therefore “has their land become desolate, their cities are burnt with fire, their country strangers are devouring before their own eyes; the daughter of Sion has been deserted like a cottage in a vineyard, or a lodge in a garden of cucumbers,”3421

    3421


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 45
    Isa. lii. 5.

    and in another passage: “Lay the penalty on3977

    3977 Sancite.

    Him who surrenders3978

    3978 Circumscribit.

    His own life, who is held in contempt by the Gentiles, whether servants or magistrates.”3979

    3979


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xvii Pg 12
    Deut. xv. 2.

    Now, when He commands that a debt be remitted to a man who shall be unable to pay it (for it is a still stronger argument when He forbids its being asked for from a man who is even able to repay it), what else does He teach than that we should lend to those of whom we cannot receive again, inasmuch as He has imposed so great a loss on lending? “And ye shall be the children of God.”4103

    4103


    Anf-01 ii.ii.lii Pg 5
    Ps. li. 17.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 5
    Ps. li. 17.

    Because, therefore, God stands in need of nothing, He declares in the preceding Psalm: “I will take no calves out of thine house, nor he-goats out of thy fold. For Mine are all the beasts of the earth, the herds and the oxen on the mountains: I know all the fowls of heaven, and the various tribes4011

    4011 Or, “the beauty,” species.

    of the field are Mine. If I were hungry, I would not tell thee: for the world is Mine, and the fulness thereof. Shall I eat the flesh of bulls, or drink the blood of goats?”4012

    4012


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xviii Pg 7
    Ps. li. 1–17.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vii.iii Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 10
    See Ps. li. 17 (in LXX. l. 19).

    and elsewhere, “Sacrifice to God a sacrifice of praise, and render to the Highest thy vows.”1205

    1205


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xxv Pg 9
    Dan. vi. 10; comp. Ps. lv. 17 (in the LXX. it is liv. 18).

    in accordance (of course) with Israel’s discipline—we pray at least not less than thrice in the day, debtors as we are to ThreeFather, Son, and Holy Spirit: of course, in addition to our regular prayers which are due, without any admonition, on the entrance of light and of night. But, withal, it becomes believers not to take food, and not to go to the bath, before interposing a prayer; for the refreshments and nourishments of the spirit are to be held prior to those of the flesh, and things heavenly prior to things earthly.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 16
    Ps. cxiii. 5–8.

    that is, in His own kingdom. And likewise earlier, in the book of Kings,3948

    3948 The books of “Samuel” were also called the books of “Kings.”

    Hannah the mother of Samuel gives glory to God in these words: “He raiseth the poor man from the ground, and the beggar, that He may set him amongst the princes of His people (that is, in His own kingdom), and on thrones of glory” (even royal ones).3949

    3949


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xii Pg 42
    1 Sam. ii. 7, 8; Ps. cxlvii. 6; Luke i. 52.

    Is he then the same God as He who gave Satan power over the person of Job that his “strength might be made perfect in weakness?”5780

    5780


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxiv Pg 57
    See 1 Sam. ii. 6–8, Ps. cxiii. 7, and Luke i. 52.

    Since, therefore, it is quite consistent in the Creator to pronounce different sentences in the two directions of reward and punishment, we shall have to conclude that there is here no diversity of gods,4858

    4858 Divinitatum; “divine powers.”

    but only a difference in the actual matters4859

    4859 Ipsarum materiarum.

    before us.


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xii Pg 42
    1 Sam. ii. 7, 8; Ps. cxlvii. 6; Luke i. 52.

    Is he then the same God as He who gave Satan power over the person of Job that his “strength might be made perfect in weakness?”5780

    5780


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 18
    1 Sam. ii. 8.

    And by Isaiah how He inveighs against the oppressors of the needy! “What mean ye that ye set fire to my vineyard, and that the spoil of the poor is in your houses? Wherefore do ye beat my people to pieces, and grind the face of the needy?”3950

    3950


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxviii Pg 30
    Comp. 1 Sam. ii. 8 with Ps. cxiii. 7 and Luke i. 52.

    From Him, therefore, will proceed the parable of the rich man, who flattered himself about the increase of his fields, and to Whom God said: “Thou fool, this night shall they require thy soul of thee; then whose shall those things be which thou hast provided?”4648

    4648


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.iv Pg 30


    Anf-01 v.ii.v Pg 11
    Prov. iii. 34; Jas. iv. 6; 1 Pet. v. 5.

    and, “The proud have greatly transgressed.” The Lord also says to the priests, “He that heareth you, heareth Me; and he that heareth Me, heareth the Father that sent Me. He that despiseth you, despiseth Me; and he that despiseth Me, despiseth Him that sent Me.”


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxx Pg 3
    Prov. iii. 34; Jas. iv. 6; 1 Pet. v. 5.

    Let us cleave, then, to those to whom grace has been given by God. Let us clothe ourselves with concord and humility, ever exercising self-control, standing far off from all whispering and evil-speaking, being justified by our works, and not our words. For [the Scripture] saith, “He that speaketh much, shall also hear much in answer. And does he that is ready in speech deem himself righteous? Blessed is he that is born of woman, who liveth but a short time: be not given to much speaking.”123

    123


    Anf-01 v.ii.v Pg 4
    Prov. iii. 34; Jas. iv. 6; 1 Pet. v. 5.

    Let us be careful, then, not to set ourselves in opposition to the bishop, in order that we may be subject to God.


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xiii Pg 4
    Isa. lxvi. 2.


    Anf-01 v.iv.vii Pg 9
    Isa. lxvi. 2.

    And do ye also reverence your bishop as Christ Himself, according as the blessed apostles have enjoined you. He that is within the altar is pure, wherefore also he is obedient to the bishop and presbyters: but he that is without is one that does anything apart from the bishop, the presbyters, and the deacons. Such a person is defiled in his conscience, and is worse than an infidel. <index subject1="Bishop" subject2="duties of" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p9.2"/>For what is the bishop but one who beyond all others possesses all power and authority, so far as it is possible for a man to possess it, who according to his ability has been made an imitator of the Christ of God?773

    773 Some render, “being a resemblance according to the power of Christ.”

    <index subject1="Presbytery" subject2="its function" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p10.1"/>And what is the presbytery but a sacred assembly, the counsellors and assessors of the bishop? <index subject1="Deacons" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p10.2"/><index subject1="James the Just" title="69" id="v.iv.vii-p10.3"/>And what are the deacons but imitators of the angelic powers,774

    774 Some read, “imitators of Christ, ministering to the bishop, as Christ to the Father.”

    fulfilling a pure and blameless ministry unto him, as the holy Stephen did to the blessed James, Timothy and Linus to Paul, Anencletus and Clement to Peter? He, therefore, that will not yield obedience to such, must needs be one utterly without God, an impious man who despises Christ, and depreciates His appointments.


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xix Pg 6
    Isa. lxvi. 2. All the preceding clauses are given in Cod. Sin. in distinct lines.

    Thou shalt not be mindful of evil against thy brother. Thou shalt not be of doubtful mind1692

    1692


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 33.1


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lix Pg 3
    Ex. ii. 23.

    and so on until, ‘Go and gather the elders of Israel, and thou shalt say unto them, The Lord God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath appeared to me, saying, I am surely beholding you, and the things which have befallen you in Egypt.’ ”2163

    2163


    Anf-01 ix.vi.viii Pg 16
    Ex. iii. 7, 8.

    For the Son, who is the Word of God, arranged these things beforehand from the beginning, the Father being in no want of angels, in order that He might call the creation into being, and form man, for whom also the creation was made; nor, again, standing in need of any instrumentality for the framing of created things, or for the ordering of those things which had reference to man; while, [at the same time,] He has a vast and unspeakable number of servants. For His offspring and His similitude3879

    3879 Massuet here observes, that the fathers called the Holy Spirit the similitude of the Son.

    do minister to Him in every respect; that is, the Son and the Holy Spirit, the Word and Wisdom; whom all the angels serve, and to whom they are subject. Vain, therefore, are those who, because of that declaration, “No man knoweth the Father, but the Son,”3880

    3880


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xiii Pg 13
    Ex. iii. 7, 8.

    it being customary from the beginning with the Word of God to ascend and descend for the purpose of saving those who were in affliction.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.viii Pg 48.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.xiv Pg 6
    Compare Ps. ii. 4.

    how was the evil one cut asunder,9173

    9173 i.e. with rage and disappointment.

    while Job with mighty equanimity kept scraping off9174

    9174


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vi Pg 34.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.iii Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 44
    Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11" id="v.iv.vi.vi-p44.1" parsed="|1Cor|3|19|3|20;|Job|5|13|0|0;|Ps|94|11|0|0" osisRef="Bible:1Cor.3.19-1Cor.3.20 Bible:Job.5.13 Bible:Ps.94.11">1 Cor. iii. 19, 20; Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11.

    For in general we may conclude for certain that he could not possibly have cited the authority of that God whom he was bound to destroy, since he would not teach for Him.5467

    5467 Si non illi doceret.

    “Therefore,” says he, “let no man glory in man;”5468

    5468


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 8
    1 Kings x. 1.

    she whom the Lord also referred to as one who should rise up in the judgment with the nations of those men who do hear His words, and do not believe in Him, and should condemn them, inasmuch as she submitted herself to the wisdom announced by the servant of God, while these men despised that wisdom which proceeded directly from the Son of God. For Solomon was a servant, but Christ is indeed the Son of God, and the Lord of Solomon. While, therefore, he served God without blame, and ministered to His dispensations, then was he glorified: but when he took wives from all nations, and permitted them to set up idols in Israel, the Scripture spake thus concerning him: “And King Solomon was a lover of women, and he took to himself foreign women; and it came to pass, when Solomon was old, his heart was not perfect with the Lord his God. And the foreign women turned away his heart after strange gods. And Solomon did evil in the sight of the Lord: he did not walk after the Lord, as did David his father. And the Lord was angry with Solomon; for his heart was not perfect with the Lord, as was the heart of David his father.”4181

    4181


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxviii Pg 9
    1 Kings xi. 1.

    The Scripture has thus sufficiently reproved him, as the presbyter remarked, in order that no flesh may glory in the sight of the Lord.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 9
    I am not acquainted with any such passage. Oehler refers to Isa. xlix. in his margin, but gives no verse, and omits to notice this passage of the present treatise in his index.

    Thus, therefore, before this temporal sabbath, there was withal an eternal sabbath foreshown and foretold; just as before the carnal circumcision there was withal a spiritual circumcision foreshown. In short, let them teach us, as we have already premised, that Adam observed the sabbath; or that Abel, when offering to God a holy victim, pleased Him by a religious reverence for the sabbath; or that Enoch, when translated, had been a keeper of the sabbath; or that Noah the ark-builder observed, on account of the deluge, an immense sabbath; or that Abraham, in observance of the sabbath, offered Isaac his son; or that Melchizedek in his priesthood received the law of the sabbath.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 27.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 14.1


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxxiii Pg 28
    See Bull’s Works, Vol. V., p. 381.

    I value it chiefly because it proves that the Greek Testament, elsewhere says, disjointedly, what is collected into 1 John v. 7. It is, therefore, Holy Scripture in substance, if not in the letter. What seems to me important, however, is the balance it gives to the whole context, and the defective character of the grammar and logic, if it be stricken out. In the Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate of the Old Testament we have a precisely similar case. Refer to Psa. xiii., alike in the Latin and the Greek, as compared with our English Version.8214

    8214


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxvi Pg 5
    Ps. i. 3.

    Again, the righteous is said to flourish like the palm-tree. God appeared from a tree to Abraham, as it is written, near the oak in Mamre. The people found seventy willows and twelve springs after crossing the Jordan.2290

    2290


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 11
    Ps. i. 3–6.

    Mark how He has described at once both the water and the cross. For these words imply, Blessed are they who, placing their trust in the cross, have gone down into the water; for, says He, they shall receive their reward in due time: then He declares, I will recompense them. But now He saith,1601

    1601 Cod. Sin. has, “what meaneth?”

    “Their leaves shall not fade.” This meaneth, that every word which proceedeth out of your mouth in faith and love shall tend to bring conversion and hope to many. Again, another prophet saith, “And the land of Jacob shall be extolled above every land.”1602

    1602


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 17.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 19.1


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 14
    Ps. i. 1–3; xcii. 12–; 15.

    If you have renounced temples, make not your own gate a temple. I have said too little. If you have renounced stews, clothe not your own house with the appearance of a new brothel.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xix Pg 17
    Ps. i. 3.

    “He that hath clean hands and a pure heart, who hath not taken God’s name in vain, nor sworn deceitfully to his neighbour, he shall receive blessing from the Lord, and mercy from the God of his salvation.”2937

    2937


    Anf-03 vi.ii.iv Pg 11
    So the Cod. Sin. Hilgenfeld reads, with the Latin, “let us take.”

    heed in these last days; for the whole [past] time of your faith will profit you nothing, unless now in this wicked time we also withstand coming sources of danger, as becometh the sons of God. That the Black One1478

    1478


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 125.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 4
    Cod. Sin. has, “have dug a pit of death.” See Jer. ii. 12, 13.

    Is my holy hill Zion a desolate rock? For ye shall be as the fledglings of a bird, which fly away when the nest is removed.”1594


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxiv Pg 7
    Jer. ii. 13.



    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxl Pg 2
    Jer. ii. 13.

    But they are cisterns broken, and holding no water, which your own teachers have digged, as the Scripture also expressly asserts, ‘teaching for doctrines the commandments of men.’2483

    2483


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxv Pg 6
    Jer. ii. 13.

    out of earthly trenches, and drink putrid water out of the mire, fleeing from the faith of the Church lest they be convicted; and rejecting the Spirit, that they may not be instructed.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 23.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.xiii Pg 32
    ὑδατος ζωῆς in the LXX. here (ed. Tischendorf, who quotes the Cod. Alex. as reading, however, ὑδατος ζῶντος). Comp. Rev. xxii. 1, 17, and xxi. 6; John vii. 37–39. (The reference, it will be seen, is still to Jer. ii. 10–13; but the writer has mixed up words of Amos therewith.)

    and they have digged for themselves worn-out tanks, which will not be able to contain water.” Undoubtedly, by not receiving Christ, the “fount of water of life,” they have begun to have “worn-out tanks,” that is, synagogues for the use of the “dispersions of the Gentiles,”1411

    1411


    Anf-01 ix.vi.vi Pg 10
    Ps. xlv. 16.

    Christ Himself, therefore, together with the Father, is the God of the living, who spake to Moses, and who was also manifested to the fathers.

    *margins


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xi Pg 20
    Isa. xii. 2.

    But as bringing salvation, thus: “God hath made known His salvation (salutare) in the sight of the heathen.”3412

    3412 *title *title *titles *title *titles *title *title


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 20

    VERSE 	(19) - 

    Job 21:27,28; 22:6; 24:2-12; 31:13-22,38,39; 35:9 1Sa 12:3,4 Ps 10:18


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET