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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Job 5:9


    CHAPTERS: Job 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Job 5:9

    τον 3588 ποιουντα 4160 5723 μεγαλα 3173 και 2532 ανεξιχνιαστα ενδοξα τε 5037 και 2532 εξαισια ων 5607 5752 3739 ουκ 3756 εστιν 2076 5748 αριθμος 706

    Douay Rheims Bible

    Who doth great things and unsearchable and wonderful things without
    number:

    King James Bible - Job 5:9

    Which doeth great things and unsearchable; marvellous things without number:

    World English Bible

    who does great things that can't be fathomed, marvelous things without
    number;

    Early Church Father Links

    Npnf-207 ii.xii Pg 43

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Job 5:9

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-03 vi.ii.xii Pg 10
    Cod. Sin. has, “and He shall make him alive.”

    [to others], whom they believed to have destroyed on the cross1614

    1614 Literally, “the sign.”

    when Israel was failing. For since transgression was committed by Eve through means of the serpent, [the Lord] brought it to pass that every [kind of] serpents bit them, and they died,1615

    1615


    Anf-01 v.iii.ix Pg 14
    Ps. vi., Ps. xii. (inscrip.). [N.B.—The reference is to the title of these two psalms, as rendered by the LXX. Εἰς τὸ τέλος ὑπὲρ τῆς ὀγδόης.]

    on which our life both sprang up again, and the victory over death was obtained in Christ, whom the children of perdition, the enemies of the Saviour, deny, “whose god is their belly, who mind earthly things,”692

    692


    Anf-01 v.vii.ix Pg 5
    Ps. vi. 5.

    For “behold the man, and his work is before him.”1035

    1035


    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.



    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 60.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xv Pg 5
    Ps. xxxi. 18.

    [and “let the Lord destroy all the lying lips,64

    64 These words within brackets are not found in the ms., but have been inserted from the Septuagint by most editors.

    ] and the boastful tongue of those who have said, Let us magnify our tongue; our lips are our own; who is lord over us? For the oppression of the poor, and for the sighing of the needy, will I now arise, saith the Lord: I will place him in safety; I will deal confidently with him.”65

    65


    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.



    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.



    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xii Pg 5.1


    Npnf-201 iv.viii.xvii Pg 11


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xx Pg 3
    Job xxxviii. 11.

    The ocean, impassable to man, and the worlds beyond it, are regulated by the same enactments of the Lord. The seasons of spring, summer, autumn, and winter, peacefully give place to one another. The winds in their several quarters89

    89 Or, “stations.”

    fulfil, at the proper time, their service without hindrance. The ever-flowing fountains, formed both for enjoyment and health, furnish without fail their breasts for the life of men. The very smallest of living beings meet together in peace and concord. All these the great Creator and Lord of all has appointed to exist in peace and harmony; while He does good to all, but most abundantly to us who have fled for refuge to His compassions through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom be glory and majesty for ever and ever. Amen.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xx Pg 12
    Nah. i. 4.

    including the winds indeed, whereby it was disquieted. With what evidence would you have my Christ vindicated? Shall it come from the examples, or from the prophecies, of the Creator? You suppose that He is predicted as a military and armed warrior,4226

    4226 See above, book iii. chap. xiii.

    instead of one who in a figurative and allegorical sense was to wage a spiritual warfare against spiritual enemies, in spiritual campaigns, and with spiritual weapons: come now, when in one man alone you discover a multitude of demons calling itself Legion,4227

    4227


    Anf-01 ii.ii.liv Pg 4
    Ps. xxiv. 1; 1 Cor. x. 26; 28.

    These things they who live a godly life, that is never to be repented of, both have done and always will do.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxvii Pg 35
    Ps. xxiv. 1.

    Wherefore also the Apostle Paul says in the Epistle to the Romans, “For there is no power but of God; the powers that be are ordained of God. Whosoever resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God; and they that resist shall receive unto themselves condemnation. For rulers are not for a terror to a good work, but to an evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power? Do that which is good, and thou shalt have praise of the same; for he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, the avenger for wrath upon him that doeth evil. Wherefore ye must needs be subject, not only for wrath, but also for conscience sake. For this cause pay ye tribute also; for they are God’s ministers, attending continually upon this very thing.”4384

    4384


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxv Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxvi Pg 4
    Ps. xxiv.

    Accordingly, it is shown that Solomon is not the Lord of hosts; but when our Christ rose from the dead and ascended to heaven, the rulers in heaven, under appointment of God, are commanded to open the gates of heaven, that He who is King of glory may enter in, and having ascended, may sit on the right hand of the Father until He make the enemies His footstool, as has been made manifest by another Psalm. For when the rulers of heaven saw Him of uncomely and dishonoured appearance, and inglorious, not recognising Him, they inquired, ‘Who is this King of glory?’ And the Holy Spirit, either from the person of His Father, or from His own person, answers them, ‘The Lord of hosts, He is this King of glory.’ For every one will confess that not one of those who presided over the gates of the temple at Jerusalem would venture to say concerning Solomon, though he was so glorious a king, or concerning the ark of testimony, ‘Who is this King of glory?’


    Anf-02 vi.ii.x Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xvii Pg 43.1


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 14
    Ps. xxiv. 1.

    It was when the waters were withdrawn into their hollow abysses that the dry land became conspicuous,6411

    6411 Emicantior.

    which was hitherto covered with its watery envelope. Then it forthwith becomes “visible,”6412

    6412 “Visibilis” is here the opposite of the term “invisibilis,” which Tertullian uses for the Scripture phrase “without form.”

    God saying, “Let the water be gathered together into one mass,6413

    6413 In congregatione una.

    and let the dry land appear.”6414

    6414


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxv Pg 0


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxvi Pg 4
    Ps. xxiv.

    Accordingly, it is shown that Solomon is not the Lord of hosts; but when our Christ rose from the dead and ascended to heaven, the rulers in heaven, under appointment of God, are commanded to open the gates of heaven, that He who is King of glory may enter in, and having ascended, may sit on the right hand of the Father until He make the enemies His footstool, as has been made manifest by another Psalm. For when the rulers of heaven saw Him of uncomely and dishonoured appearance, and inglorious, not recognising Him, they inquired, ‘Who is this King of glory?’ And the Holy Spirit, either from the person of His Father, or from His own person, answers them, ‘The Lord of hosts, He is this King of glory.’ For every one will confess that not one of those who presided over the gates of the temple at Jerusalem would venture to say concerning Solomon, though he was so glorious a king, or concerning the ark of testimony, ‘Who is this King of glory?’


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 32.2


    ecf19Oz116z86; 119:125 143:12


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    and all other things in succession; but neither gods nor angels [had any share in the work].


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxviii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    then the sun, and the moon, and the stars. For having learned this in Egypt, and having been much taken with what Moses had written in the Genesis of the world, he fabled that Vulcan had made in the shield of Achilles a kind of representation of the creation of the world. For he wrote thus:2568

    2568 Iliad, xviii. 483.

    “There he described the earth, the heaven, the sea, The sun that rests not, and the moon full-orb’d; There also, all the stars which round about, As with a radiant frontlet, bind the skies.”


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 2
    Gen. i. 1.

    for, as they maintain, by naming these four,—God, beginning, heaven, and earth,—he set forth their Tetrad. Indicating also its invisible and hidden nature, he said, “Now the earth was invisible and unformed.”2880

    2880


    Anf-02 iii.ii.v Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 17.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.iii Pg 11
    Gen. i. 1.

    and as long as He continued making, one after the other, those things of which He was to be the Lord, it merely mentions God.  “And God said,” “and God made,” “and God saw;”6160

    6160


    Anf-03 v.v.xix Pg 6
    Gen. i. 1.

    just as it would have said, “At last God made the heaven and the earth,” if God had created these after all the rest.  Now, if the beginning is a substance, the end must also be material. No doubt, a substantial thing6320

    6320 Substantivum aliquid.

    may be the beginning of some other thing which may be formed out of it; thus the clay is the beginning of the vessel, and the seed is the beginning of the plant. But when we employ the word beginning in this sense of origin, and not in that of order, we do not omit to mention also the name of that particular thing which we regard as the origin of the other. On the other hand,6321

    6321 De cetero.

    if we were to make such a statement as this, for example, “In the beginning the potter made a basin or a water-jug,” the word beginning will not here indicate a material substance (for I have not mentioned the clay, which is the beginning in this sense, but only the order of the work, meaning that the potter made the basin and the jug first, before anything else—intending afterwards to make the rest. It is, then, to the order of the works that the word beginning has reference, not to the origin of their substances. I might also explain this word beginning in another way, which would not, however, be inapposite.6322

    6322 Non ab re tamen.

    The Greek term for beginning, which is ἀρχή, admits the sense not only of priority of order, but of power as well; whence princes and magistrates are called ἀρχοντες. Therefore in this sense too, beginning may be taken for princely authority and power. It was, indeed, in His transcendent authority and power, that God made the heaven and the earth.


    Anf-03 v.v.xx Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    —“and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  All things were made by Him, and without Him nothing was made.”6333

    6333


    Anf-03 v.v.xxii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 1.

    I revere6345

    6345 Adoro: reverently admire.

    the fulness of His Scripture, in which He manifests to me both the Creator and the creation. In the gospel, moreover, I discover a Minister and Witness of the Creator, even His Word.6346

    6346


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 3
    Gen. i. 1.

    The Scripture, which at its very outset proposes to run through the order thereof tells us as its first information that it was created; it next proceeds to set forth what sort of earth it was.6367

    6367 Qualitatem ejus: unless this means “how He made it,” like the “qualiter fecerit” below.

    In like manner with respect to the heaven, it informs us first of its creation—“In the beginning God made the heaven:”6368

    6368


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    it then goes on to introduce its arrangement; how that God both separated “the water which was below the firmament from that which was above the firmament,”6369

    6369


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 29
    Cum cælo separavit: Gen. i. 1.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-01 ii.ii.lii Pg 4
    Ps. l. 14, 15.

    For “the sacrifice of God is a broken spirit.”235

    235


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 8
    Ps. l. 14, 15.

    rejecting, indeed, those things by which sinners imagined they could propitiate God, and showing that He does Himself stand in need of nothing; but He exhorts and advises them to those things by which man is justified and draws nigh to God. This same declaration does Esaias make: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto Me? saith the Lord. I am full.”4014

    4014


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 11
    Ps. l. (xlix. in LXX.) 14.

    Thus, accordingly, the spiritual “sacrifices of praise” are pointed to, and “an heart contribulate” is demonstrated an acceptable sacrifice to God. And thus, as carnal sacrifices are understood to be reprobated—of which Isaiah withal speaks, saying, “To what end is the multitude of your sacrifices to me? saith the Lord1206

    1206


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxii Pg 15
    Ps. xxii. 22; 25.

    In the sixty-seventh Psalm He says again: “In the congregations bless ye the Lord God.”3413

    3413


    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.



    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 60.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xv Pg 5
    Ps. xxxi. 18.

    [and “let the Lord destroy all the lying lips,64

    64 These words within brackets are not found in the ms., but have been inserted from the Septuagint by most editors.

    ] and the boastful tongue of those who have said, Let us magnify our tongue; our lips are our own; who is lord over us? For the oppression of the poor, and for the sighing of the needy, will I now arise, saith the Lord: I will place him in safety; I will deal confidently with him.”65

    65


    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.



    Anf-03 vi.vii.ii Pg 6
    See Ps. lxxiv. 23 in A.V. It is Ps. lxxiii. in the LXX.

    so that by His own patience He disparages Himself; for the cause why many believe not in the Lord is that they are so long without knowing9024

    9024 Because they see no visible proof of it.

    that He is wroth with the world.9025

    9025 Sæculo.



    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xii Pg 5.1


    Npnf-201 iv.viii.xvii Pg 11


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 21.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.iii.xii Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.i Pg 24.1


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 28


    Anf-02 iv.ii.i.vi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 48
    Ps. cxviii. 8.

    and the same thing is said about glorying (in princes).5471

    5471


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 53
    Ps. cxviii. 8, 9.

    Thus everything which is caught at by men is adjured by the Creator, down to their good words.4033

    4033 Nedum benedictionem.

    It is as much His property to condemn the praise and flattering words bestowed on the false prophets by their fathers, as to condemn their vexatious and persecuting treatment of the (true) prophets. As the injuries suffered by the prophets could not be imputed4034

    4034 Non pertinuissent ad.

    to their own God, so the applause bestowed on the false prophets could not have been displeasing to any other god but the God of the true prophets.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 53
    Ps. cxviii. 8, 9.

    Thus everything which is caught at by men is adjured by the Creator, down to their good words.4033

    4033 Nedum benedictionem.

    It is as much His property to condemn the praise and flattering words bestowed on the false prophets by their fathers, as to condemn their vexatious and persecuting treatment of the (true) prophets. As the injuries suffered by the prophets could not be imputed4034

    4034 Non pertinuissent ad.

    to their own God, so the applause bestowed on the false prophets could not have been displeasing to any other god but the God of the true prophets.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvii Pg 26
    Ps. cxviii. 9.

    and pronounces him to be altogether wretched who places his confidence in man. But whoever4599

    4599 Quodsiquis.

    aims at high position, because he would glory in the officious attentions4600

    4600 Officiis.

    of other people, (in every such case,) inasmuch as He forbade such attentions (in the shape) of placing hope and confidence in man, He at the same time4601

    4601 Idem.

    censured all who were ambitious of high positions. He also inveighs against the doctors of the law themselves, because they were “lading men with burdens grievous to be borne, which they did not venture to touch with even a finger of their own;”4602

    4602


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 49
    Ps. cxviii. 9.



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 41
    Ps. cxviii. 9.

    Patient in tribulation.”5876

    5876


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 27
    Oehler refers to Isa. xix. 1. See, too, Isa. xxx. and xxxi.

    So, again, Babylon, in our own John, is a figure of the city Rome, as being equally great and proud of her sway, and triumphant over the saints.1273

    1273


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.iii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xvii Pg 7.1


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. xxi. 4.

    indicating that it is the Father of all who imparts continuance for ever and ever on those who are saved. For life does not arise from us, nor from our own nature; but it is bestowed according to the grace of God. And therefore he who shall preserve the life bestowed upon him, and give thanks to Him who imparted it, shall receive also length of days for ever and ever. But he who shall reject it, and prove himself ungrateful to his Maker, inasmuch as he has been created, and has not recognised Him who bestowed [the gift upon him], deprives himself of [the privilege of] continuance for ever and ever.3293

    3293 As Massuet observes, this statement is to be understood in harmony with the repeated assertion of Irenæus that the wicked will exist in misery for ever. It refers not annihilation, but to deprivation of happiness.

    And, for this reason, the Lord declared to those who showed themselves ungrateful towards Him: “If ye have not been faithful in that which is little, who will give you that which is great?”3294

    3294


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xviii Pg 4
    Deut. xxxii. 35; Rom. xii. 19.

    Therefore, in the meanwhile, the commission of wrong was to be checked2914

    2914 Repastinaretur.

    by the fear of a retribution immediately to happen; and so the permission of this retribution was to be the prohibition of provocation, that a stop might thus be put to all hot-blooded2915

    2915 Æstuata.

    injury, whilst by the permission of the second the first is prevented by fear, and by this deterring of the first the second fails to be committed. By the same law another result is also obtained,2916

    2916 Qua et alias.

    even the more ready kindling of the fear of retaliation by reason of the very savour of passion which is in it. There is no more bitter thing, than to endure the very suffering which you have inflicted upon others. When, again, the law took somewhat away from men’s food, by pronouncing unclean certain animals which were once blessed, you should understand this to be a measure for encouraging continence, and recognise in it a bridle imposed on that appetite which, while eating angelsfood, craved after the cucumbers and melons of the Egyptians. Recognise also therein a precaution against those companions of the appetite, even lust and luxury, which are usually chilled by the chastening of the appetite.2917

    2917 Ventris.

    For “the people sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up to play.”2918

    2918


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xvi Pg 15
    Deut. xxxii. 35; comp. Rom. xii. 19 and Heb. x. 30.

    He thereby teaches that patience calmly waits for the infliction of vengeance. Therefore, inasmuch as it is incredible4048

    4048 Fidem non capit.

    that the same (God) should seem to require “a tooth for a tooth and an eye for an eye,” in return for an injury, who forbids not only all reprisals, but even a revengeful thought or recollection of an injury, in so far does it become plain to us in what sense He required “an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth,”—not, indeed, for the purpose of permitting the repetition of the injury by retaliating it, which it virtually prohibited when it forbade vengeance; but for the purpose of restraining the injury in the first instance, which it had forbidden on pain of retaliation or reciprocity;4049

    4049 Talione, opposito.

    so that every man, in view of the permission to inflict a second (or retaliatory) injury, might abstain from the commission of the first (or provocative) wrong. For He knows how much more easy it is to repress violence by the prospect of retaliation, than by the promise of (indefinite) vengeance.  Both results, however, it was necessary to provide, in consideration of the nature and the faith of men, that the man who believed in God might expect vengeance from God, while he who had no faith (to restrain him) might fear the laws which prescribed retaliation.4050

    4050 Leges talionis. [Judicial, not personal, reprisals.]

    This purpose4051

    4051 Voluntatem.

    of the law, which it was difficult to understand, Christ, as the Lord of the Sabbath and of the law, and of all the dispensations of the Father, both revealed and made intelligible,4052

    4052 Compotem facit. That is, says Oehler, intellectus sui.

    when He commanded that “the other cheek should be offered (to the smiter),” in order that He might the more effectually extinguish all reprisals of an injury, which the law had wished to prevent by the method of retaliation, (and) which most certainly revelation4053

    4053 Prophetia.

    had manifestly restricted, both by prohibiting the memory of the wrong, and referring the vengeance thereof to God.  Thus, whatever (new provision) Christ introduced, He did it not in opposition to the law, but rather in furtherance of it, without at all impairing the prescription4054

    4054 Disciplinas: or, “lessons.”

    of the Creator. If, therefore,4055

    4055 Denique.

    one looks carefully4056

    4056 Considerem, or, as some of the editions have it, consideremus.

    into the very grounds for which patience is enjoined (and that to such a full and complete extent), one finds that it cannot stand if it is not the precept of the Creator, who promises vengeance, who presents Himself as the judge (in the case).  If it were not so,4057

    4057 Alioquin.

    —if so vast a weight of patience—which is to refrain from giving blow for blow; which is to offer the other cheek; which is not only not to return railing for railing, but contrariwise blessing; and which, so far from keeping the coat, is to give up the cloak also—is laid upon me by one who means not to help me,—(then all I can say is,) he has taught me patience to no purpose,4058

    4058 In vacuum.

    because he shows me no reward to his precept—I mean no fruit of such patience. There is revenge which he ought to have permitted me to take, if he meant not to inflict it himself; if he did not give me that permission, then he should himself have inflicted it;4059

    4059 Præstare, i.e., debuerat præstare.

    since it is for the interest of discipline itself that an injury should be avenged. For by the fear of vengeance all iniquity is curbed. But if licence is allowed to it without discrimination,4060

    4060 Passim.

    it will get the mastery—it will put out (a man’s) both eyes; it will knock out4061

    4061 Excitatura.

    every tooth in the safety of its impunity.  This, however, is (the principle) of your good and simply beneficent god—to do a wrong to patience, to open the door to violence, to leave the righteous undefended, and the wicked unrestrained! “Give to every one that asketh of thee”4062

    4062


    Anf-03 vi.vii.x Pg 13
    Deut. xxxii. 35; Ps. xciv. 1; Rom. xii. 19; Heb. x. 30.

    that is, Leave patience to me, and I will reward patience. For when He says, “Judge not, lest ye be judged,”9122

    9122


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.iii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 20
    Isa. xl. 28.

    much more, shall neither die at any time, nor be buried!), and therefore that it was uniformly one God, even the Father, who at all times did Himself the things which were really done by Him through the agency of the Son.


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 28


    Anf-02 iv.ii.i.vi Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 48
    Ps. cxviii. 8.

    and the same thing is said about glorying (in princes).5471

    5471


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 53
    Ps. cxviii. 8, 9.

    Thus everything which is caught at by men is adjured by the Creator, down to their good words.4033

    4033 Nedum benedictionem.

    It is as much His property to condemn the praise and flattering words bestowed on the false prophets by their fathers, as to condemn their vexatious and persecuting treatment of the (true) prophets. As the injuries suffered by the prophets could not be imputed4034

    4034 Non pertinuissent ad.

    to their own God, so the applause bestowed on the false prophets could not have been displeasing to any other god but the God of the true prophets.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 53
    Ps. cxviii. 8, 9.

    Thus everything which is caught at by men is adjured by the Creator, down to their good words.4033

    4033 Nedum benedictionem.

    It is as much His property to condemn the praise and flattering words bestowed on the false prophets by their fathers, as to condemn their vexatious and persecuting treatment of the (true) prophets. As the injuries suffered by the prophets could not be imputed4034

    4034 Non pertinuissent ad.

    to their own God, so the applause bestowed on the false prophets could not have been displeasing to any other god but the God of the true prophets.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvii Pg 26
    Ps. cxviii. 9.

    and pronounces him to be altogether wretched who places his confidence in man. But whoever4599

    4599 Quodsiquis.

    aims at high position, because he would glory in the officious attentions4600

    4600 Officiis.

    of other people, (in every such case,) inasmuch as He forbade such attentions (in the shape) of placing hope and confidence in man, He at the same time4601

    4601 Idem.

    censured all who were ambitious of high positions. He also inveighs against the doctors of the law themselves, because they were “lading men with burdens grievous to be borne, which they did not venture to touch with even a finger of their own;”4602

    4602


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 49
    Ps. cxviii. 9.



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 41
    Ps. cxviii. 9.

    Patient in tribulation.”5876

    5876


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 27
    Oehler refers to Isa. xix. 1. See, too, Isa. xxx. and xxxi.

    So, again, Babylon, in our own John, is a figure of the city Rome, as being equally great and proud of her sway, and triumphant over the saints.1273

    1273


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.iii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xvii Pg 7.1


    Anf-01 v.iii.iii Pg 16
    Ex. xvi. 8.

    No one of those has, [in fact,] remained unpunished, who rose up against their superiors. For Dathan and Abiram did not speak against the law, but against Moses,657

    657


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xiv Pg 7
    Num. xi. and xxi.

    Against young lads, too, did He send forth bears, for their irreverence to the prophet.2872

    2872


    Anf-03 vi.iii.xx Pg 10
    Viz. by their murmuring for bread (see Ex. xvi. 3; 7); and again—nearly forty years after—in another place. See Num. xxi. 5.

    For the people, after crossing the sea, and being carried about in the desert during forty years, although they were there nourished with divine supplies, nevertheless were more mindful of their belly and their gullet than of God. Thereupon the Lord, driven apart into desert places after baptism,8752

    8752


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 48
    Ps. cxviii. 8.

    and the same thing is said about glorying (in princes).5471

    5471


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 53
    Ps. cxviii. 8, 9.

    Thus everything which is caught at by men is adjured by the Creator, down to their good words.4033

    4033 Nedum benedictionem.

    It is as much His property to condemn the praise and flattering words bestowed on the false prophets by their fathers, as to condemn their vexatious and persecuting treatment of the (true) prophets. As the injuries suffered by the prophets could not be imputed4034

    4034 Non pertinuissent ad.

    to their own God, so the applause bestowed on the false prophets could not have been displeasing to any other god but the God of the true prophets.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 53
    Ps. cxviii. 8, 9.

    Thus everything which is caught at by men is adjured by the Creator, down to their good words.4033

    4033 Nedum benedictionem.

    It is as much His property to condemn the praise and flattering words bestowed on the false prophets by their fathers, as to condemn their vexatious and persecuting treatment of the (true) prophets. As the injuries suffered by the prophets could not be imputed4034

    4034 Non pertinuissent ad.

    to their own God, so the applause bestowed on the false prophets could not have been displeasing to any other god but the God of the true prophets.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvii Pg 26
    Ps. cxviii. 9.

    and pronounces him to be altogether wretched who places his confidence in man. But whoever4599

    4599 Quodsiquis.

    aims at high position, because he would glory in the officious attentions4600

    4600 Officiis.

    of other people, (in every such case,) inasmuch as He forbade such attentions (in the shape) of placing hope and confidence in man, He at the same time4601

    4601 Idem.

    censured all who were ambitious of high positions. He also inveighs against the doctors of the law themselves, because they were “lading men with burdens grievous to be borne, which they did not venture to touch with even a finger of their own;”4602

    4602


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 49
    Ps. cxviii. 9.



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 41
    Ps. cxviii. 9.

    Patient in tribulation.”5876

    5876


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 27
    Oehler refers to Isa. xix. 1. See, too, Isa. xxx. and xxxi.

    So, again, Babylon, in our own John, is a figure of the city Rome, as being equally great and proud of her sway, and triumphant over the saints.1273

    1273


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 20
    Isa. xl. 28.

    much more, shall neither die at any time, nor be buried!), and therefore that it was uniformly one God, even the Father, who at all times did Himself the things which were really done by Him through the agency of the Son.


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 15


    Anf-01 ix.vi.iv Pg 3
    Ps. cii. 25–28. The cause of the difference in the numbering of the Psalms is that the Septuagint embraces in one psalm—the ninth—the two which form the ninth and tenth in the Hebrew text.

    pointing out plainly what things they are that pass away, and who it is that doth endure for ever—God, together with His servants. And in like manner Esaias says: “Lift up your eyes to the heavens, and look upon the earth beneath; for the heaven has been set together as smoke, and the earth shall wax old like a garment, and they who dwell therein shall die in like manner. But my salvation shall be for ever, and my righteousness shall not pass away.”3832

    3832


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 5
    There is, if the text be genuine, some confusion here.  Melchizedek does not appear to have been, in any sense, “subsequent” to Abraham, for he probably was senior to him; and, moreover, Abraham does not appear to have been “already circumcised” carnally when Melchizedek met him. Comp. Gen. xiv. with Gen. xvii.

    “But again,” (you say) “the son of Moses would upon one occasion have been choked by an angel, if Zipporah,1165

    1165


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxii Pg 5
    Gen. xxii. 17, Gen. xxviii. 4.

    All these, therefore, were highly honoured, and made great, not for their own sake, or for their own works, or for the righteousness which they wrought, but through the operation of His will. And we, too, being called by His will in Christ Jesus, are not justified by ourselves, nor by our own wisdom, or understanding, or godliness, or works which we have wrought in holiness of heart; but by that faith through which, from the beginning, Almighty God has justified all men; to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xx Pg 25
    Gen. xxii. 17.

    Therefore “one star differeth from another star in glory.”6119

    6119


    Anf-03 iv.ix.i Pg 11
    See Gen. xxii. 18; and comp. Gal. iii. 16, and the reference in both places.

    and that1130

    1130


    Anf-01 vi.ii.vi Pg 34
    Gen. i. 28.

    Who then is able to govern the beasts, or the fishes, or the fowls of heaven? For we ought to perceive that to govern implies authority, so that one should command and rule. If, therefore, this does not exist at present, yet still He has promised it to us. When? When we ourselves also have been made perfect [so as] to become heirs of the covenant of the Lord.1526

    1526 These are specimens of the “Gnosis,” or faculty of bringing out the hidden spiritual meaning of Scripture referred to before. Many more such interpretations follow.



    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxiii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 28.

    We see,138

    138 Or, “let us consider.”

    then, how all righteous men have been adorned with good works, and how the Lord Himself, adorning Himself with His works, rejoiced. Having therefore such an example, let us without delay accede to His will, and let us work the work of righteousness with our whole strength.


    Anf-01 vi.ii.vi Pg 21
    Gen. i. 28.

    These things [were spoken] to the Son. Again, I will show thee how, in respect to us,1513

    1513 Cod. Sin. inserts, “the Lord says.”

    He has accomplished a second fashioning in these last days. The Lord says, “Behold, I will make1514

    1514 Cod. Sin. has “I make.”

    the last like the first.”1515

    1515


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 26; 28.

    And that you may not change the [force of the] words just quoted, and repeat what your teachers assert,—either that God said to Himself, ‘Let Us make,’ just as we, when about to do something, oftentimes say to ourselves, ‘Let us make;’ or that God spoke to the elements, to wit, the earth and other similar substances of which we believe man was formed, ‘Let Us make,’—I shall quote again the words narrated by Moses himself, from which we can indisputably learn that [God] conversed with some one who was numerically distinct from Himself, and also a rational Being. These are the words: ‘And God said, Behold, Adam has become as one of us, to know good and evil.’2175

    2175


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xii Pg 3
    Gen. i. 28.


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xxiii Pg 7.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 53.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 232.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ix Pg 270.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxix Pg 10
    Gen. i. 28.

    but also, “Thou shalt not commit adultery,” and, “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s wife;”2681

    2681


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xxvii Pg 6
    Gen. i. 28.

    Excess, however, has He cursed, in adulteries, and wantonness, and chambering.1698

    1698 Lupanaria.

    Well, now, in this usual function of the sexes which brings together the male and the female in their common intercourse, we know that both the soul and the flesh discharge a duty together: the soul supplies desire, the flesh contributes the gratification of it; the soul furnishes the instigation, the flesh affords the realization. The entire man being excited by the one effort of both natures, his seminal substance is discharged, deriving its fluidity from the body, and its warmth from the soul. Now if the soul in Greek is a word which is synonymous with cold,1699

    1699 See above, c. xxv. p. 206.

    how does it come to pass that the body grows cold after the soul has quitted it? Indeed (if I run the risk of offending modesty even, in my desire to prove the truth), I cannot help asking, whether we do not, in that very heat of extreme gratification when the generative fluid is ejected, feel that somewhat of our soul has gone from us? And do we not experience a faintness and prostration along with a dimness of sight?  This, then, must be the soul-producing seed, which arises at once from the out-drip of the soul, just as that fluid is the body-producing seed which proceeds from the drainage of the flesh.  Most true are the examples of the first creation. Adam’s flesh was formed of clay. Now what is clay but an excellent moisture, whence should spring the generating fluid?  From the breath of God first came the soul. But what else is the breath of God than the vapour of the spirit, whence should spring that which we breathe out through the generative fluid? Forasmuch, therefore, as these two different and separate substances, the clay and the breath, combined at the first creation in forming the individual man, they then both amalgamated and mixed their proper seminal rudiments in one, and ever afterwards communicated to the human race the normal mode of its propagation, so that even now the two substances, although diverse from each other, flow forth simultaneously in a united channel; and finding their way together into their appointed seed-plot, they fertilize with their combined vigour the human fruit out of their respective natures.  And inherent in this human product is his own seed, according to the process which has been ordained for every creature endowed with the functions of generation. Accordingly from the one (primeval) man comes the entire outflow and redundance of men’s soulsnature proving herself true to the commandment of God, “Be fruitful, and multiply.”1700

    1700


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xxvii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 28.

    For in the very preamble of this one production, “Let us make man,”1701

    1701


    Anf-03 v.v.i Pg 15
    Quoting Gen. i. 28, “Be fruitful and multiply” (Rigalt.).

    and yet despises it in respect of his art.6137

    6137 Disregarding the law when it forbids the representation of idols.  (Rigalt.).

    He falsifies by a twofold process—with his cautery and his pen.6138

    6138 Et cauterio et stilo. The former instrument was used by the encaustic painters for burning in the wax colours into the ground of their pictures (Westropp’s Handbook of Archæology, p. 219).  Tertullian charges Hermogenes with using his encaustic art to the injury of the scriptures, by practically violating their precepts in his artistic works; and with using his pen (stilus) in corrupting the doctrine thereof by his heresy.

    He is a thorough adulterer, both doctrinally and carnally, since he is rank indeed with the contagion of your marriage-hacks,6139

    6139 By the nubentium contagium, Tertullian, in his Montanist rigour, censures those who married more than once.

    and has also failed in cleaving to the rule of faith as much as the apostle’s own Hermogenes.6140

    6140


    Anf-03 v.viii.xlv Pg 5
    Gen. i. 28.

    the flesh and the soul have had a simultaneous birth, without any calculable difference in time; so that the two have been even generated together in the womb, as we have shown in our Treatise on the Soul.7583

    7583 See ch. xxvii.

    Contemporaneous in the womb, they are also temporally identical in their birth. The two are no doubt produced by human parents7584

    7584 We treat “homines” as a nominative, after Oehler.

    of two substances, but not at two different periods; rather they are so entirely one, that neither is before the other in point of time. It is more correct (to say), that we are either entirely the old man or entirely the new, for we cannot tell how we can possibly be anything else. But the apostle mentions a very clear mark of the old man. For “put off,” says he, “concerning the former conversation, the old man;”7585

    7585


    Anf-03 vi.ii.ii Pg 3
    Or, “while these things continue, those which respect the Lord rejoice in purity along with them—Wisdom,” etc.

    For He hath revealed to us by all the prophets that He needs neither sacrifices, nor burnt-offerings, nor oblations, saying thus, “What is the multitude of your sacrifices unto Me, saith the Lord? I am full of burnt-offerings, and desire not the fat of lambs, and the blood of bulls and goats, not when ye come to appear before Me: for who hath required these things at your hands? Tread no more My courts, not though ye bring with you fine flour. Incense is a vain abomination unto Me, and your new moons and sabbaths I cannot endure.”1458

    1458


    Anf-01 ix.iv.x Pg 2
    Gen. xv. 5.

    and Him who, by His Son Christ Jesus, has called us to the knowledge of Himself, from the worship of stones, so that those who were not a people were made a people, and she beloved who was not beloved3374

    3374


    Anf-01 ix.vi.viii Pg 8
    Gen. xv. 5.

    as John the Baptist says: “For God is able from these stones to raise up children unto Abraham.”3873

    3873


    Anf-01 ii.ii.x Pg 5
    Gen. xv. 5, 6; Rom. iv. 3.

    On account of his faith and hospitality, a son was given him in his old age; and in the exercise of obedience, he offered him as a sacrifice to God on one of the mountains which He showed him.49

    49


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxxx Pg 2
    Deut. xxxii. 43.

    and I added what follows of the passage: “ ‘Rejoice, O ye nations, with His people, and let all the angels of God be strengthened in Him: for the blood of His sons He avenges, and will avenge, and will recompense His enemies with vengeance, and will recompense those that hate Him; and the Lord will purify the land of His people.’ And by these words He declares that we, the nations, rejoice with His people, —to wit, Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and the prophets, and, in short, all of that people who are well-pleasing to God, according to what has been already agreed on between us. But we will not receive it of all your nation; since we know from Isaiah2459

    2459 Isa. lxvi. 24.

    that the members of those who have transgressed shall be consumed by the worm and unquenchable fire, remaining immortal; so that they become a spectacle to all flesh. <index subject1="Israel applied to Chirst" title="265" id="viii.iv.cxxx-p3.2"/>But in addition to these, I wish, sirs,” said I, “to add some other passages from the very words of Moses, from which you may understand that God has from of old dispersed all men according to their kindreds and tongues; and out of all kindreds has taken to Himself your kindred, a useless, disobedient, and faithless generation; and has shown that those who were selected out of every nation have obeyed His will through Christ,—whom He calls also Jacob, and names Israel, —and these, then, as I mentioned fully previously, must be Jacob and Israel. For when He says, ‘Rejoice, O ye nations, with His people,’ He allots the same inheritance to them, and does not call them by the same name;2460

    2460 The reading is, “and calls them by the same name.” But the whole argument shows that the Jews and Gentiles are distinguished by name. [But that Gentiles are also called (Israel) by the same name is the point here.]

    but when He says that they as Gentiles rejoice with His people, He calls them Gentiles to reproach you. For even as you provoked Him to anger by your idolatry, so also He has deemed those who were idolaters worthy of knowing His will, and of inheriting His inheritance.


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.iii Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xix Pg 31
    Job 5.12,13" id="v.iv.vi.xix-p31.1" parsed="|Isa|29|14|0|0;|1Cor|1|19|0|0;|Jer|8|9|0|0;|Job|5|12|5|13" osisRef="Bible:Isa.29.14 Bible:1Cor.1.19 Bible:Jer.8.9 Bible:Job.5.12-Job.5.13">Isa. xxix. 14, quoted 1 Cor. i. 19; comp. Jer. viii. 9 and Job v. 12, 13.

    Thanks to this simplicity of truth, so opposed to the subtlety and vain deceit of philosophy, we cannot possibly have any relish for such perverse opinions.  Then, if God “quickens us together with Christ, forgiving us our trespasses,”6086

    6086


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.vi Pg 44
    Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11" id="v.iv.vi.vi-p44.1" parsed="|1Cor|3|19|3|20;|Job|5|13|0|0;|Ps|94|11|0|0" osisRef="Bible:1Cor.3.19-1Cor.3.20 Bible:Job.5.13 Bible:Ps.94.11">1 Cor. iii. 19, 20; Job v. 13; Ps. xciv. 11.

    For in general we may conclude for certain that he could not possibly have cited the authority of that God whom he was bound to destroy, since he would not teach for Him.5467

    5467 Si non illi doceret.

    “Therefore,” says he, “let no man glory in man;”5468

    5468


    Npnf-201 iii.xv.ix Pg 19


    Npnf-201 iv.vi.i.xxxviii Pg 9


    Anf-01 ii.ii.lv Pg 4
    Esth. vii.; viii.

    .


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.v Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 10.1


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxxiii Pg 28
    See Bull’s Works, Vol. V., p. 381.

    I value it chiefly because it proves that the Greek Testament, elsewhere says, disjointedly, what is collected into 1 John v. 7. It is, therefore, Holy Scripture in substance, if not in the letter. What seems to me important, however, is the balance it gives to the whole context, and the defective character of the grammar and logic, if it be stricken out. In the Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate of the Old Testament we have a precisely similar case. Refer to Psa. xiii., alike in the Latin and the Greek, as compared with our English Version.8214

    8214


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxxiii Pg 28
    See Bull’s Works, Vol. V., p. 381.

    I value it chiefly because it proves that the Greek Testament, elsewhere says, disjointedly, what is collected into 1 John v. 7. It is, therefore, Holy Scripture in substance, if not in the letter. What seems to me important, however, is the balance it gives to the whole context, and the defective character of the grammar and logic, if it be stricken out. In the Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate of the Old Testament we have a precisely similar case. Refer to Psa. xiii., alike in the Latin and the Greek, as compared with our English Version.8214

    8214


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 6.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 32
    Isa. i. 8.

    With what constancy has He also, in Psalm xxx., laboured to present to us the very Christ! He calls with a loud voice to the Father, “Into Thine hands I commend my spirit,”5151

    5151


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xiii Pg 5
    Isa. lvii. 16.

    Thus does he attribute the Spirit as peculiar to God which in the last times He pours forth upon the human race by the adoption of sons; but [he shows] that breath was common throughout the creation, and points it out as something created. Now what has been made is a different thing from him who makes it. The breath, then, is temporal, but the Spirit eternal. The breath, too, increases [in strength] for a short period, and continues for a certain time; after that it takes its departure, leaving its former abode destitute of breath. But when the Spirit pervades the man within and without, inasmuch as it continues there, it never leaves him. “But that is not first which is spiritual,” says the apostle, speaking this as if with reference to us human beings; “but that is first which is animal, afterwards that which is spiritual,”4534

    4534


    Anf-03 iv.xi.xi Pg 6
    Tertullian’s reading of Isa. lvii. 16.

    And again:  “He giveth breath unto the people that are on the earth, and Spirit to them that walk thereon.”1565

    1565


    Anf-03 v.v.xxxii Pg 14
    Flatum: “breath;” so LXX. of Isa. lvii. 16.

    In like manner the same Wisdom says of the waters, “Also when He made the fountains strong, things which6468

    6468 Fontes, quæ.

    are under the sky, I was fashioning6469

    6469 Modulans.

    them along with Him.”6470

    6470


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.x Pg 10
    Mic. vii. 18, 19.

    Now, if nothing of this sort had been predicted of Christ, I should find in the Creator examples of such a benignity as would hold out to me the promise of similar affections also in the Son of whom He is the Father. I see how the Ninevites obtained forgiveness of their sins from the Creator3769

    3769


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xvii Pg 41
    Hab. iii. 2.

    Paul also says: “But when the fulness of time came, God sent forth His Son.”3603

    3603


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 49
    Hab. iii. 2, according to the Septuagint. St. Augustine similarly applied this passage, De Civit. Dei, ii. 32.

    These likewise did Zechariah see under the figure of the two olive trees and olive branches.4366

    4366


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 62
    Ps. xlv. 3, 4.

    And whatever other things of a like nature are spoken regarding Him, these indicated that beauty and splendour which exist in His kingdom, along with the transcendent and pre-eminent exaltation [belonging] to all who are under His sway, that those who hear might desire to be found there, doing such things as are pleasing to God. Again, there are those who say, “He is a man, and who shall know him?”4303

    4303


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxviii Pg 0


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 3.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xv Pg 5.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 34
    Ps. xlv. 4 (xliv. 5 in LXX.).

    Who will ply the sword without practising the contraries to lenity and justice; that is, guile, and asperity, and injustice, proper (of course) to the business of battles?  See we, then, whether that which has another action be not another sword,—that is, the Divine word of God, doubly sharpened1279

    1279


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiv Pg 6
    Ps. xlv. 4.

    But who shall produce these results with the sword, and not their opposites rather—deceit, and harshness, and injury—which, it must be confessed, are the proper business of battles? Let us see, therefore, whether that is not some other sword, which has so different an action. Now the Apostle John, in the Apocalypse, describes a sword which proceeded from the mouth of God as “a doubly sharp, two-edged one.”3290

    3290


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiv Pg 12
    Ps. xlv. 4, but changed.

    even the might of Thy spiritual grace, whereby the knowledge of Christ is spread. “Thine arrows are sharp;”3296

    3296


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.x Pg 4.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.lii Pg 4
    Ps. l. 14, 15.

    For “the sacrifice of God is a broken spirit.”235

    235


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 8
    Ps. l. 14, 15.

    rejecting, indeed, those things by which sinners imagined they could propitiate God, and showing that He does Himself stand in need of nothing; but He exhorts and advises them to those things by which man is justified and draws nigh to God. This same declaration does Esaias make: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto Me? saith the Lord. I am full.”4014

    4014


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xvii Pg 7.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 6.1


    Anf-03 v.viii.xxx Pg 1
    Chapter XXX.—This Vision Interpreted by Tertullian of the Resurrection of the Bodies of the Dead.  A Chronological Error of Our Author, Who Supposes that Ezekiel in His Ch. XXXI. Prophesied Before the Captivity.


    Anf-02 ii.ii.i Pg 23.1
    136:16


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxiv Pg 50
    Isa. xxxv. 8, 9, Sept.

    he points out the way of faith, by which we shall reach to God; and then to this way of faith he promises this utter crippling4462

    4462 Evacuationem.

    and subjugation of all noxious animals.  Lastly, you may discover the suitable times of the promise, if you read what precedes the passage: “Be strong, ye weak hands and ye feeble knees: then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall hear; then shall the lame man leap as an hart, and the tongue of the dumb shall be articulate.”4463

    4463


    Anf-03 v.viii.lviii Pg 3
    Isa. xxxv. 10.

    Well, there is nothing eternal until after the resurrection. “And sorrow and sighing,” continues he, “shall flee away.”7729

    7729


    Anf-03 v.viii.lviii Pg 4
    Ver. 10.

    The angel echoes the same to John: “And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes;”7730

    7730


    Anf-01 v.v.viii Pg 5
    Ps. cxvi. 12.

    Now God, even the Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ, shall reveal these things to you, [so that ye shall know] that I speak truly. <index subject1="Ignatius" subject2="seeks the prayers of the Churches" title="77" id="v.v.viii-p5.2"/>And do ye pray along with me, that I may attain my aim in the Holy Spirit. I have not written to you according to the flesh, but according to the will of God. If I shall suffer, ye have loved me; but if I am rejected, ye have hated me.


    Anf-01 vi.ii.vi Pg 10
    Ps. xxii. 17, Ps. cxviii. 12.

    and “upon my garment they cast lots.”1502

    1502


    Anf-02 vi.iv.i.xxvii Pg 7.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 25
    Or, perhaps, “not affected, as a body, with human sufferings;” in allusion to such passages as Deut. viii. 4; xxix. 5; Neh. ix. 21.

    meats, but fed on “angel’s loaves1185

    1185


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 32
    Deut. viii. 12–14.

    In similar terms, when king Hezekiah became proud of his treasures, and gloried in them rather than in God before those who had come on an embassy from Babylon,4012

    4012 Tertullian says, ex Perside.

    (the Creator) breaks forth4013

    4013 Insilit.

    against him by the mouth of Isaiah:  “Behold, the days come when all that is in thine house, and that which thy fathers have laid up in store, shall be carried to Babylon.”4014

    4014


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxix Pg 52
    Comp. Deut. viii. 12–14.

    Some places there were in Jerusalem where to teach; other places outside Jerusalem whither to retire5064

    5064


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xx Pg 7
    Deut. xxxii. 6; 20.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xi Pg 12
    Deut. xxxii. 6.

    And again, he indicates that He who from the beginning founded and created them, the Word, who also redeems and vivifies us in the last times, is shown as hanging on the tree, and they will not believe on Him. For he says, “And thy life shall be hanging before thine eyes, and thou wilt not believe thy life.”3926

    3926


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xi Pg 14
    Deut. xxxii. 6. “Owned thee,” i.e., following the meaning of the Hebrew, “owned thee by generation.”



    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxii Pg 8
    Deut. xxxii. 6, LXX. [Let us reflect that this effort to spiritualize this awful passage in the history of Lot is an innocent but unsuccessful attempt to imitate St. Paul’s allegory, Gal. iv. 24.]

    At what time, then, did He pour out upon the human race the life-giving seed—that is, the Spirit of the remission of sins, through means of whom we are quickened? Was it not then, when He was eating with men, and drinking wine upon the earth? For it is said, “The Son of man came eating and drinking;”4235

    4235


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 48.1


    Anf-03 vi.vii.iii Pg 3
    So Mr. Dodgson; and La Cerda, as quoted by Oehler. See Ps. cxxxi. 1 in LXX., where it is Ps. cxxx.

    but what is that which, in a certain way, has been grasped by hand9027

    9027 *marg:


    Anf-03 v.vii.iii Pg 15
    Gen. xxxii.

    Has it, then, been permitted to angels, which are inferior to God, after they have been changed into human bodily form,6983

    6983 See below in chap. vi. and in the Anti-Marcion, iii. 9.

    nevertheless to remain angels? and will you deprive God, their superior, of this faculty, as if Christ could not continue to be God, after His real assumption of the nature of man? Or else, did those angels appear as phantoms of flesh? You will not, however, have the courage to say this; for if it be so held in your belief, that the Creator’s angels are in the same condition as Christ, then Christ will belong to the same God as those angels do, who are like Christ in their condition. If you had not purposely rejected in some instances, and corrupted in others, the Scriptures which are opposed to your opinion, you would have been confuted in this matter by the Gospel of John, when it declares that the Spirit descended in the body6984

    6984 Corpore.

    of a dove, and sat upon the Lord.6985

    6985


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxxix Pg 21
    See Gen. xxxii. 28.

    Now, one cannot wonder that He forbade “premeditation,” who actually Himself received from the Father the ability of uttering words in season: “The Lord hath given to me the tongue of the learned, that I should know how to speak a word in season (to him that is weary);”5034

    5034


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.ii Pg 24


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.x Pg 9.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xii Pg 5.1


    Npnf-201 iv.viii.xvii Pg 11


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xviii Pg 4
    Deut. xxxii. 35; Rom. xii. 19.

    Therefore, in the meanwhile, the commission of wrong was to be checked2914

    2914 Repastinaretur.

    by the fear of a retribution immediately to happen; and so the permission of this retribution was to be the prohibition of provocation, that a stop might thus be put to all hot-blooded2915

    2915 Æstuata.

    injury, whilst by the permission of the second the first is prevented by fear, and by this deterring of the first the second fails to be committed. By the same law another result is also obtained,2916

    2916 Qua et alias.

    even the more ready kindling of the fear of retaliation by reason of the very savour of passion which is in it. There is no more bitter thing, than to endure the very suffering which you have inflicted upon others. When, again, the law took somewhat away from men’s food, by pronouncing unclean certain animals which were once blessed, you should understand this to be a measure for encouraging continence, and recognise in it a bridle imposed on that appetite which, while eating angelsfood, craved after the cucumbers and melons of the Egyptians. Recognise also therein a precaution against those companions of the appetite, even lust and luxury, which are usually chilled by the chastening of the appetite.2917

    2917 Ventris.

    For “the people sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up to play.”2918

    2918


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xvi Pg 15
    Deut. xxxii. 35; comp. Rom. xii. 19 and Heb. x. 30.

    He thereby teaches that patience calmly waits for the infliction of vengeance. Therefore, inasmuch as it is incredible4048

    4048 Fidem non capit.

    that the same (God) should seem to require “a tooth for a tooth and an eye for an eye,” in return for an injury, who forbids not only all reprisals, but even a revengeful thought or recollection of an injury, in so far does it become plain to us in what sense He required “an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth,”—not, indeed, for the purpose of permitting the repetition of the injury by retaliating it, which it virtually prohibited when it forbade vengeance; but for the purpose of restraining the injury in the first instance, which it had forbidden on pain of retaliation or reciprocity;4049

    4049 Talione, opposito.

    so that every man, in view of the permission to inflict a second (or retaliatory) injury, might abstain from the commission of the first (or provocative) wrong. For He knows how much more easy it is to repress violence by the prospect of retaliation, than by the promise of (indefinite) vengeance.  Both results, however, it was necessary to provide, in consideration of the nature and the faith of men, that the man who believed in God might expect vengeance from God, while he who had no faith (to restrain him) might fear the laws which prescribed retaliation.4050

    4050 Leges talionis. [Judicial, not personal, reprisals.]

    This purpose4051

    4051 Voluntatem.

    of the law, which it was difficult to understand, Christ, as the Lord of the Sabbath and of the law, and of all the dispensations of the Father, both revealed and made intelligible,4052

    4052 Compotem facit. That is, says Oehler, intellectus sui.

    when He commanded that “the other cheek should be offered (to the smiter),” in order that He might the more effectually extinguish all reprisals of an injury, which the law had wished to prevent by the method of retaliation, (and) which most certainly revelation4053

    4053 Prophetia.

    had manifestly restricted, both by prohibiting the memory of the wrong, and referring the vengeance thereof to God.  Thus, whatever (new provision) Christ introduced, He did it not in opposition to the law, but rather in furtherance of it, without at all impairing the prescription4054

    4054 Disciplinas: or, “lessons.”

    of the Creator. If, therefore,4055

    4055 Denique.

    one looks carefully4056

    4056 Considerem, or, as some of the editions have it, consideremus.

    into the very grounds for which patience is enjoined (and that to such a full and complete extent), one finds that it cannot stand if it is not the precept of the Creator, who promises vengeance, who presents Himself as the judge (in the case).  If it were not so,4057

    4057 Alioquin.

    —if so vast a weight of patience—which is to refrain from giving blow for blow; which is to offer the other cheek; which is not only not to return railing for railing, but contrariwise blessing; and which, so far from keeping the coat, is to give up the cloak also—is laid upon me by one who means not to help me,—(then all I can say is,) he has taught me patience to no purpose,4058

    4058 In vacuum.

    because he shows me no reward to his precept—I mean no fruit of such patience. There is revenge which he ought to have permitted me to take, if he meant not to inflict it himself; if he did not give me that permission, then he should himself have inflicted it;4059

    4059 Præstare, i.e., debuerat præstare.

    since it is for the interest of discipline itself that an injury should be avenged. For by the fear of vengeance all iniquity is curbed. But if licence is allowed to it without discrimination,4060

    4060 Passim.

    it will get the mastery—it will put out (a man’s) both eyes; it will knock out4061

    4061 Excitatura.

    every tooth in the safety of its impunity.  This, however, is (the principle) of your good and simply beneficent god—to do a wrong to patience, to open the door to violence, to leave the righteous undefended, and the wicked unrestrained! “Give to every one that asketh of thee”4062

    4062


    Anf-03 vi.vii.x Pg 13
    Deut. xxxii. 35; Ps. xciv. 1; Rom. xii. 19; Heb. x. 30.

    that is, Leave patience to me, and I will reward patience. For when He says, “Judge not, lest ye be judged,”9122

    9122


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 5

    VERSE 	(9) - 

    Job 9:10; 11:7-9; 37:5 Ps 40:5; 72:18; 86:10 Ro 11:33


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET