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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Romans 8:3


    CHAPTERS: Romans 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: GEN - BIB - COMM


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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Romans 8:3

    το 3588 γαρ 1063 αδυνατον 102 του 3588 νομου 3551 εν 1722 ω 3739 ησθενει 770 5707 δια 1223 της 3588 σαρκος 4561 ο 3588 θεος 2316 τον 3588 εαυτου 1438 υιον 5207 πεμψας 3992 5660 εν 1722 ομοιωματι 3667 σαρκος 4561 αμαρτιας 266 και 2532 περι 4012 αμαρτιας 266 κατεκρινεν 2632 5656 την 3588 αμαρτιαν 266 εν 1722 τη 3588 σαρκι 4561

    Douay Rheims Bible

    For what the
    law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh; God sending his own Son, in the likeness of sinful flesh and of sin, hath condemned sin in the flesh;

    King James Bible - Romans 8:3

    For what the
    law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:

    World English Bible

    For what the
    law couldn't do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God did, sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh;

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxi Pg 12, Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiii Pg 48, Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 3, Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 9, Anf-03 v.vii.xvi Pg 10, Anf-03 v.vii.xvi Pg 10, Anf-03 v.vii.xvi Pg 11, Anf-03 v.viii.xvi Pg 6, Anf-03 v.viii.xlvi Pg 11, Anf-04 iii.viii.xvii Pg 12, Anf-06 iii.iv.iii.xii Pg 13, Anf-06 xi.v.iii.ii Pg 32, Anf-06 xii.iii.ix Pg 20, Anf-09 xv.iii.ii.xxi Pg 4, Anf-09 xvi.ii.vii.vii Pg 6, Npnf-101 vii.1.CXLIII Pg 11, Npnf-101 vii.1.CLXIV Pg 52, Npnf-103 iv.vi.xxvi Pg 2, Npnf-104 iv.ix.xviii Pg 39, Npnf-104 iv.ix.xvi Pg 27, Npnf-104 iv.ix.xx Pg 17, Npnf-104 iv.ix.xvi Pg 12, Npnf-104 iv.ix.xxi Pg 26, Npnf-105 x.iii.xliii Pg 10, Npnf-105 x.iii.lxviii Pg 3, Npnf-105 x.iv.lviii Pg 3, Npnf-105 xv.iv.xxxvii Pg 5, Npnf-105 xvi.v.xiii Pg 5, Npnf-105 xi.xxxvii Pg 6, Npnf-105 xviii.v.ii Pg 4, Npnf-106 vi.v.v Pg 23, Npnf-106 vii.xxi Pg 23, Npnf-106 vii.lxxxvi Pg 19, Npnf-106 vii.lxxxviii Pg 34, Npnf-107 iii.xlii Pg 21, Npnf-107 iii.xliii Pg 4, Npnf-107 iii.xcvi Pg 21, Npnf-107 iii.cix Pg 12, Npnf-108 ii.CXIX.xvi Pg 10, Npnf-108 ii.L Pg 31, Npnf-108 ii.XXXV Pg 48, Npnf-108 ii.LXVIII Pg 51, Npnf-108 ii.LXIX Pg 73, Npnf-108 ii.LXXXVIII Pg 22, Npnf-110 iii.XVI Pg 42, Npnf-111 vi.xvii Pg 8, Npnf-111 vii.xv Pg 42, Npnf-111 vii.ix Pg 18, Npnf-111 vii.xv Pg 5, Npnf-113 iii.iii.iii Pg 47, Npnf-113 iv.iii.viii Pg 13, Npnf-114 iv.lxxii Pg 5, Npnf-114 v.xi Pg 32, Npnf-114 v.xi Pg 33, Npnf-114 v.xvii Pg 33, Npnf-114 v.xviii Pg 56, Npnf-114 v.lxxii Pg 5, Npnf-114 vi.xi Pg 32, Npnf-114 vi.xi Pg 33, Npnf-114 vi.xvii Pg 33, Npnf-114 vi.xviii Pg 56, Npnf-202 ii.viii.xxiii Pg 29, Npnf-204 v.ii.iv Pg 23, Npnf-204 v.iv.ii Pg 10, Npnf-204 v.iv.ii Pg 7, Npnf-204 v.iv.v Pg 9, Npnf-204 xvi.ii.vi Pg 2, Npnf-204 xvi.ii.vi Pg 2, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.i.xi Pg 50, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.i.xii Pg 48, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.i.xii Pg 48, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.i.xiii Pg 69, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.iii.vii Pg 35, Npnf-204 xxii.ii.iii Pg 47, Npnf-204 xxv.iii.iv.xv Pg 26, Npnf-204 xvi.ii.vi Pg 2, Npnf-204 v.iv.ii Pg 7, Npnf-204 v.iv.v Pg 9, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.i.xi Pg 50, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.i.xii Pg 48, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.i.xiii Pg 69, Npnf-204 xxii.ii.iii Pg 47, Npnf-204 xxv.iii.iv.xv Pg 26, Npnf-204 xvi.ii.vi Pg 2, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.i.xii Pg 48, Npnf-204 xxi.ii.iii.vii Pg 35, Npnf-205 viii.i.viii.i Pg 12, Npnf-205 viii.i.viii.i Pg 14, Npnf-206 v.CXXXIII Pg 106, Npnf-208 ix.cclxii Pg 19, Npnf-209 ii.v.ii.ix Pg 49, Npnf-209 ii.v.ii.ix Pg 156, Npnf-209 ii.v.ii.x Pg 64, Npnf-209 iii.iv.iv.xxii Pg 10, Npnf-210 iv.iv.v.iv Pg 14, Npnf-210 iv.iv.vii.viii Pg 18, Npnf-210 iv.vi.ii.iii Pg 9, Npnf-211 iv.vii.v.iii Pg 3

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Romans 8:3

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxi Pg 12
    Rom. viii. 3.

    to condemn sin, and to cast it, as now a condemned thing, away beyond the flesh, but that He might call man forth into His own likeness, assigning him as [His own] imitator to God, and imposing on him His Father’s law, in order that he may see God, and granting him power to receive the Father; [being]3693

    3693 The punctuation and exact meaning are very uncertain.

    the Word of God who dwelt in man, and became the Son of man, that He might accustom man to receive God, and God to dwell in man, according to the good pleasure of the Father.


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiii Pg 48
    Compare the first part of ver. 4 with vers. 5 and 6 and viii. 2; 3.

    But, behold, he bears testimony to the law, and excuses it on the ground of sin:  “What shall we say, therefore? Is the law sin? God forbid.”5831

    5831


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 3
    Rom. viii. 3.

    it must not therefore be said that the flesh which He seemed to have was but a phantom. For he in a previous verse ascribed sin to the flesh, and made it out to be “the law of sin dwelling in his members,” and “warring against the law of the mind.”5838

    5838


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 9
    This vindication of these terms of the apostle from Docetism is important. The word which our A.V. has translated sinful is a stronger term in the original. It is not the adjective ἁμαρτωλοῦ, but the substantive ἁμαρτίας, amounting to “flesh of sin,” i.e. (as Dean Alford interprets it) “the flesh whose attribute and character is sin.” “The words ἐν ὁμοιώματι σαρκὸς ἁμαρτίας, De Wette observes, appear almost to border on Docetism, but in reality contain a perfectly true and consistent sentiment; σὰρξ ἁμαρτίας; is flesh, or human nature, possessed with sin.…The likeness, predicated in Rom. viii. 3, must be referred not only to σάρξ, but also to the epithet τῆς ἁμαρτίας” (Greek Testament, in loc.).

    if he meant the “likeness” to be so predicated of the substance as to deny the verity thereof; in that case he would only have used the word “flesh,” and omitted the “sinful.” But inasmuch as he has put the two together, and said “sinful flesh,” (or “flesh of sin,”)5844

    5844 Carnis peccati.

    he has both affirmed the substance, that is, the flesh and referred the likeness to the fault of the substance, that is, to its sin. But even suppose5845

    5845 Puta nunc.

    that the likeness was predicated of the substance, the truth of the said substance will not be thereby denied.  Why then call the true substance like? Because it is indeed true, only not of a seed of like condition5846

    5846 Statu.

    with our own; but true still, as being of a nature5847

    5847 Censu: perhaps “birth.” This word, which originally means the censor’s registration, is by our author often used for origo and natura, because in the registers were inserted the birthdays and the parents’ names (Oehler).

    not really unlike ours.5848

    5848 It is better that we should give the original of this sentence.  Its structure is characteristically difficult, although the general sense, as Oehler suggests, is clear enough:  “Quia vera quidem, sed non ex semine de statu simili (similis, Latinius and Junius and Semler), sed vera de censu non vero dissimili (dissimilis, the older reading and Semler’s).” We add the note of Fr. Junius: “The meaning is, that Christ’s flesh is true indeed, in what they call the identity of its substance, although not of its origin (ortus) and qualities—not of its original, because not of a (father’s) seed, as in the case of ourselves; not of qualities, because these have not in Him the like condition which they have in us.”

    And again, in contrary things there is no likeness. Thus the likeness of flesh would not be called spirit, because flesh is not susceptible of any likeness to spirit; but it would be called phantom, if it seemed to be that which it really was not. It is, however, called likeness, since it is what it seems to be. Now it is (what it seems to be), because it is on a par with the other thing (with which it is compared).5849

    5849 Dum alterius par est.

    But a phantom, which is merely such and nothing else,5850

    5850 Qua hoc tantum est.

    is not a likeness. The apostle, however, himself here comes to our aid; for, while explaining in what sense he would not have us “live in the flesh,” although in the flesh—even by not living in the works of the flesh5851

    5851


    Anf-03 v.vii.xvi Pg 10
    “Tertullian, referring to St. Paul, says of Christ: ‘Evacuavit peccatum in carne;’ alluding, as I suppose, to Romans viii. 3. But the corresponding Greek in the printed editions is κατέκρινε τὴν ἁμαρτίαν ἐν τῇ σαρκί (‘He condemned sin in the flesh’). Had Tertullian a different reading in his Greek mss., or did he confound Romans viii. 3 with Romans vi. 6, ἵνα καταργηθῇ τὸ σῶμα τὴς ἁμαρτίας (‘that the body of sin might be destroyed’)? Jerome translates the Greek καταργέω by ‘evacuo,’ c. xvi. See Adv. Marcionem, ver. 14. Dr. Neander has pointed out two passages in which Tertullian has ‘damnavit or damnaverit delinquentiam in carne.’ See de Res. Carnis. 46; de Pudicitiâ. 17.”—Bp. Kaye.

    Now in another sentence he says that Christ was “in the likeness of sinful flesh,”7175

    7175


    Anf-03 v.vii.xvi Pg 10
    “Tertullian, referring to St. Paul, says of Christ: ‘Evacuavit peccatum in carne;’ alluding, as I suppose, to Romans viii. 3. But the corresponding Greek in the printed editions is κατέκρινε τὴν ἁμαρτίαν ἐν τῇ σαρκί (‘He condemned sin in the flesh’). Had Tertullian a different reading in his Greek mss., or did he confound Romans viii. 3 with Romans vi. 6, ἵνα καταργηθῇ τὸ σῶμα τὴς ἁμαρτίας (‘that the body of sin might be destroyed’)? Jerome translates the Greek καταργέω by ‘evacuo,’ c. xvi. See Adv. Marcionem, ver. 14. Dr. Neander has pointed out two passages in which Tertullian has ‘damnavit or damnaverit delinquentiam in carne.’ See de Res. Carnis. 46; de Pudicitiâ. 17.”—Bp. Kaye.

    Now in another sentence he says that Christ was “in the likeness of sinful flesh,”7175

    7175


    Anf-03 v.vii.xvi Pg 11
    Also in Rom. viii. 3.

    not, however, as if He had taken on Him “the likeness of the flesh,” in the sense of a semblance of body instead of its reality; but he means us to understand likeness to the flesh which sinned,7176

    7176 Peccatricis carnis.

    because the flesh of Christ, which committed no sin itself, resembled that which had sinned,—resembled it in its nature, but not in the corruption it received from Adam; whence we also affirm that there was in Christ the same flesh as that whose nature in man is sinful.  In the flesh, therefore, we say that sin has been abolished, because in Christ that same flesh is maintained without sin, which in man was not maintained without sin. Now, it would not contribute to the purpose of Christ’s abolishing sin in the flesh, if He did not abolish it in that flesh in which was the nature of sin, nor (would it conduce) to His glory. For surely it would have been no strange thing if He had removed the stain of sin in some better flesh, and one which should possess a different, even a sinless, nature! Then, you say, if He took our flesh, Christ’s was a sinful one. Do not, however, fetter with mystery a sense which is quite intelligible. For in putting on our flesh, He made it His own; in making it His own, He made it sinless.  A word of caution, however, must be addressed to all who refuse to believe that our flesh was in Christ on the ground that it came not of the seed of a human father,7177

    7177 Viri.

    let them remember that Adam himself received this flesh of ours without the seed of a human father. As earth was converted into this flesh of ours without the seed of a human father, so also was it quite possible for the Son of God to take to Himself7178

    7178 Transire in: “to pass into.”

    the substance of the selfsame flesh, without a human father’s agency.7179

    7179 Sine coagulo.



    Anf-03 v.viii.xvi Pg 6
    Rom. viii. 3.

    lest it should be supposed to be free from all responsibility by the mere fact of its seeming to be impelled by the soul.  So, again, when he is ascribing certain praiseworthy actions to the flesh, he says, “Therefore glorify and exalt God in your body,”7378

    7378


    Anf-03 v.viii.xlvi Pg 11
    Rom. viii. 3.

    —not the flesh in sin, for the house is not to be condemned with its inhabitant. He said, indeed, that “sin dwelleth in our body.”7598

    7598


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 8

    VERSE 	(3) - 

    Ro 3:20; 7:5-11 Ac 13:39 Ga 3:21 Heb 7:18,19; 10:1-10,14


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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