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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 16:22


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40

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    King James Bible - Acts 16:22

    And the multitude rose up together against them: and the magistrates rent off their clothes, and commanded to beat them.

    World English Bible

    The multitude rose up together against them, and the magistrates tore their clothes off of them, and commanded them to be beaten with rods.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 16:22

    And the people ran together against them; and the magistrates rending off their clothes, commanded them to be beaten with rods.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And the multitude rose together against them: and the magistrates rent off their clothes, and commanded to beat them.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ συνεπεστη 4911 5627 V-2AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM οχλος 3793 N-NSM κατ 2596 PREP αυτων 846 P-GPM και 2532 CONJ οι 3588 T-NPM στρατηγοι 4755 N-NPM περιρρηξαντες 4048 5660 V-AAP-NPM αυτων 846 P-GPM τα 3588 T-APN ιματια 2440 N-APN εκελευον 2753 5707 V-IAI-3P ραβδιζειν 4463 5721 V-PAN

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (22) -
    Ac 17:5; 18:12; 19:28 *etc:

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 16:22

    Y se agolp el pueblo contra ellos; y los magistrados rompindoles sus ropas, les mandaron azotar con varas.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 16:22

    Verse 22. The multitude rose up together] There was a
    general outcry against them; and the magistrates tore off their clothes, and delivered them to the mob, commanding the lictors, or beadles, to beat them with rods, rabdizein. This was the Roman custom of treating criminals, as Grotius has well remarked.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 22. And the multitude rose up together against them , etc.] The
    crowd of people that were gathered together in the court on this occasion; being no doubt spirited up by the proprietors of the maid, out of whom the spirit of divination was cast, and encouraged by the rulers, and being provoked at the hearing of unlawful customs being introduced among them; and the magistrates rent off their clothes ; not their own clothes, as did the high priest, ( Mark 14:63) but the clothes of Paul and Silas; and so reads the Arabic version, and the rulers rent the garments of both of them; which removes the ambiguity in the words; for at the whipping or beating of malefactors, they did not pluck off their garments, but rent and tore them off, and so whipped or beat them naked: this was the custom with the Jews f829 ; it is asked, how did they whip anyone? his hands are bound to a pillar here and there, and the minister of the synagogue (or the executioner) takes hold of his clothes; and if they are rent, they are rent, and if they are ripped, they are ripped, (be it as it will,) until he has made his breast bare, etc.

    And in like manner the Lectors, or executioners among the Romans, used to tear the garments of malefactors, when they beat them; this the magistrates themselves did here, unless they may be said to do it, because they ordered it to be done, as follows: and commanded to beat them ; that is, with rods: this was one of the three times the apostle was beat in this manner, ( 2 Corinthians 11:25) and of this shameful treatment at Philippi, he makes mention in ( Thessalonians 2:2).


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 16-24 - Satan, though the father of lies, will declare the most importan truths, when he can thereby serve his purposes. But much mischief is done to the real servants of Christ, by unholy and false preachers of the gospel, who are confounded with them by careless observers. Thos who do good by drawing men from sin, may expect to be reviled a troublers of the city. While they teach men to fear God, to believe in Christ, to forsake sin, and to live godly lives, they will be accuse of teaching bad customs.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ συνεπεστη 4911 5627 V-2AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM οχλος 3793 N-NSM κατ 2596 PREP αυτων 846 P-GPM και 2532 CONJ οι 3588 T-NPM στρατηγοι 4755 N-NPM περιρρηξαντες 4048 5660 V-AAP-NPM αυτων 846 P-GPM τα 3588 T-APN ιματια 2440 N-APN εκελευον 2753 5707 V-IAI-3P ραβδιζειν 4463 5721 V-PAN

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    22. Rent off their
    clothes (perirrhxantev). Only here in New Testament. By the usual formula of command to the lictors: Go, lictors; strip off their garments; let them be scourged!

    To beat (rabdizein). From rJabdov, a rod. Rev. properly adds, with rods.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    16:22 {Rose up together} (sunepeste). Second aorist (ingressive) active of the double compound sunefistemi, intransitive, old verb, but only here in the N.T. (cf. katepestesan in #18:12). There was no actual attack of the mob as Paul and Silas were in the hands of the officers, but a sudden and violent uprising of the people, the appeal to race and national prejudice having raised a ferment. {Rent their garments off them} (perirexantes autwn ta himatia). First aorist active participle of periregnumi, old verb, to break off all around, to strip or rend all round. Here only in the N.T. The duumvirs probably gave orders for Paul and Silas to be stripped of their outer garments (himatia), though not actually doing it with their own hands, least of all not stripping off their own garments in horror as Ramsay thinks. That would call for the middle voice. In II Macc. 4:38 the active voice is used as here of stripping off the garments of others. Paul in #1Th 2:2 refers to the shameful treatment received in Philippi, "insulted" (hubrisqentas). As a Roman citizen this was unlawful, but the duumvirs looked on Paul and Silas as vagabond and seditious Jews and "acted with the highhandedness characteristic of the fussy provincial authorities" (Knowling). {Commanded} (ekeleuon). Imperfect active, repeatedly ordered. The usual formula of command was: "Go, lictors; strip off their garments; let them be scourged." {To beat them with rods} (rhabdizein). Present active infinitive of rhabdizw, old verb, but in the N.T.=_virgis caedere_ only here and #2Co 11:25 where Paul alludes to this incident and two others not given by Luke (tris erhabdisqen). He came near getting another in Jerusalem (#Ac 22:25). Why did not Paul say here that he was a Roman citizen as he does later (verse #37) and in Jerusalem (#22:26f.)? It might have done no good in this hubbub and no opportunity was allowed for defence of any kind.


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