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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 28:2


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     

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    King James Bible - Acts 28:2

    And the barbarous people shewed us no little kindness: for they kindled a fire, and received us every one, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

    World English Bible

    The natives showed us uncommon kindness; for they kindled a
    fire, and received us all, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 28:2

    For kindling a
    fire, they refreshed us all, because of the present rain, and of the cold.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And the barbarous people showed us no little kindness: for they kindled a
    fire, and received us every one, because of the present rain, and because of the cold.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    οι
    3588 T-NPM δε 1161 CONJ βαρβαροι 915 A-NPM παρειχον 3930 5707 V-IAI-3P ου 3756 PRT-N την 3588 T-ASF τυχουσαν 5177 5631 V-2AAP-ASF φιλανθρωπιαν 5363 N-ASF ημιν 2254 P-1DP αναψαντες 381 5660 V-AAP-NPM γαρ 1063 CONJ πυραν 4443 N-ASF προσελαβοντο 4355 5639 V-2AMI-3P παντας 3956 A-APM ημας 2248 P-1AP δια 1223 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM υετον 5205 N-ASM τον 3588 T-ASM εφεστωτα 2186 5761 V-RAP-ASM και 2532 CONJ δια 1223 PREP το 3588 T-ASN ψυχος 5592 N-ASN

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (2) -
    :4 Ro 1:14 1Co 14:11 Col 3:11

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 28:2

    Y los brbaros nos mostraron no poca humanidad; porque, encendido un gran fuego, nos recibieron a todos, a causa de la lluvia que venía, y del frío.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 28:2

    Verse 2. The barbarous people] We have already seen that this
    island was peopled by the Phoenicians, or Carthaginians, as Bochart has proved, Phaleg. chap. xxvi.; and their ancient language was no doubt in use among them at that time, though mingled with some Greek and Latin terms; and this language must have been unintelligible to the Romans and the Greeks.

    With these, as well as with other nations, it was customary to call those barbaroi, barbarians, whose language they did not understand. St. Paul himself speaks after this manner in 1 Cor. xiv. 11: If I know not the meaning of the voice, I shall be unto him that speaketh a BARBARIAN, and he that speaketh shall be a BARBARIAN unto me. Thus Herodotus also, lib.

    ii. 158, says, barbarouv pantav aiguptioi kaleousi touv mh sfi omoglwssouv? The Egyptians call all those BARBARIANS who have not the same language with themselves. And Ovid, when among the Getes, says, in Trist. ver. 10: - BARBARUS hic ego sum, quia non INTELLIGOR ulli.

    "Here I am a barbarian, for no person understands me." Various etymologies have been given of this word. I think that of Bp.

    Pearce the best. The Greeks who traded with the Phoenicians, formed this word from their observing that the Phoenicians were generally called by the name of their parent, with the word rb bar, prefixed to that name; as we find in the New Testament men called Bar-Jesus, Bar-Tholomeus, Bar-Jonas, Bar-Timeus, &c. Hence the Greeks called them bar-baroi, meaning the men who are called Bar Bar, or have no other names than what begin with Bar. And because the Greeks did not understand the language of the Phoenicians, their first, and the Rom. in imitation of them, gave the name of Barbarians to all such as talked in a language to which they were strangers." No other etymology need be attempted; this is its own proof; and the Bar-melec in the preceding epitaph is, at least, collateral evidence.

    The word barbarian is therefore no term of reproach in itself; and was not so used by ancient authors, however fashionable it may be to use it so now.

    Because of the present rain and-of the cold.] This must have been sometime in October; and, when we consider the time of the year, the tempestuousness of the weather, and their escaping to shore on planks, spars, &c., wet of course to the skin, they must have been very cold, and have needed all the kindness that these well disposed people showed them.

    In some parts of Christianized Europe, the inhabitants would have attended on the beach, and knocked the survivors on the head, that they might convert the wreck to their own use! This barbarous people did not act in this way: they joined hands with God to make these sufferers live.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 2. And the barbarous people showed us no little kindness , etc.] The inhabitants of this island are called barbarians, not from the country of Barbary, near to which they were; nor so much on account of their manners, for, though Heathens, they were a civil and cultivated people, being, as appears from the name of the chief man of the island, under the Roman government; but because of their language, (see 1 Corinthians 14:11), it being neither Hebrew, Greek, nor Latin; for as the inhabitants were originally a colony of the Phoenicians, they spoke their language; and now though it is inhabited by such as are called Christians, they speak the Saracen or Arabic language, and little different from the old Punic or Phoenician language: however, though the inhabitants could not understand their language, they understood their case, and were very civil and humane to them, and showed them extraordinary kindness: for they kindled a fire ; or set fire to a large pile of wood; for a large fire it must be to be of service to such a number of people, in such a condition as they were: and received us everyone : though their number were two hundred threescore and sixteen; because of the present rain, and because of the cold ; for a violent rain fell on them, as is usual upon a storm, and much wetted them, so that a fire was very necessary; and it being winter or near it, it was cold weather; and especially they having been so long in a storm, and now shipwrecked; and some having thrown themselves into the sea, and swam to the island; and others having been obliged to put themselves on boards and planks, and get ashore, and were no doubt both wet and cold; so that nothing was more needful and more agreeable to them than a large fire.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-10 -
    God can make strangers to be friends; friends in distress. Those wh are despised for homely manners, are often more friendly than the mor polished; and the conduct of heathens, or persons called barbarians condemns many in civilized nations, professing to be Christians. The people thought that Paul was a murderer, and that the viper was sent by Divine justice, to be the avenger of blood. They knew that there is God who governs the world, so that things do not come to pass by chance, no, not the smallest event, but all by Divine direction; an that evil pursues sinners; that there are good works which God wil reward, and wicked works which he will punish. Also, that murder is dreadful crime, one which shall not long go unpunished. But the thought all wicked people were punished in this life. Though some ar made examples in this world, to prove that there is a God and Providence, yet many are left unpunished, to prove that there is judgment to come. They also thought all who were remarkably afflicte in this life were wicked people. Divine revelation sets this matter in a true light. Good men often are greatly afflicted in this life, for the trial and increase of their faith and patience. Observe Paul' deliverance from the danger. And thus in the strength of the grace of Christ, believers shake off the temptations of Satan, with holy resolution. When we despise the censures and reproaches of men, an look upon them with holy contempt, having the testimony of ou consciences for us, then, like Paul, we shake off the viper into the fire. It does us no harm, except we are kept by it from our duty. God hereby made Paul remarkable among these people, and so made way for the receiving of the gospel. The Lord raises up friends for his people in every place whither he leads them, and makes them blessings to those in affliction.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    οι
    3588 T-NPM δε 1161 CONJ βαρβαροι 915 A-NPM παρειχον 3930 5707 V-IAI-3P ου 3756 PRT-N την 3588 T-ASF τυχουσαν 5177 5631 V-2AAP-ASF φιλανθρωπιαν 5363 N-ASF ημιν 2254 P-1DP αναψαντες 381 5660 V-AAP-NPM γαρ 1063 CONJ πυραν 4443 N-ASF προσελαβοντο 4355 5639 V-2AMI-3P παντας 3956 A-APM ημας 2248 P-1AP δια 1223 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM υετον 5205 N-ASM τον 3588 T-ASM εφεστωτα 2186 5761 V-RAP-ASM και 2532 CONJ δια 1223 PREP το 3588 T-ASN ψυχος 5592 N-ASN

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    2. Barbarous people. From the
    Roman point of view, regarding all as barbarians who spoke neither Greek nor Latin. Not necessarily uncivilized. It is equivalent to foreigners.

    Compare Rom. i. 14; 1 Cor. xiv. 11. The inhabitants of Malta were of Carthaginian descent. "Even in the present day the natives of Malta have a peculiar language, termed the Maltese, which has been proved to be essentially an Arabic dialect, with an admixture of Italian" (Gloag).

    No little (ou tucousan). See on special, ch. xix. 11. Rev., much better, "no common kindness."

    Kindness (filanqrwpian). See on the kindred adverb courteously, ch xxviii. 3.

    Present rain (ueton ton efestwta). Lit., which was upon us, or had set in. No mention of rain occurs up to this point in the narrative of the shipwreck. The tempest may thus far have been unattended with rain, but it is hardly probable.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    28:2 {The barbarians} (hoi barbaroi). The Greeks called all men "barbarians" who did not speak Greek (#Ro 1:14), not "barbarians" in our sense of rude and uncivilized, but simply "foreign folk." Diodorus Siculus (V. 12) says that it was a colony of the Phoenicians and so their language was Punic (Page). The word originally meant an uncouth repetition (barbar) not understood by others (#1Co 14:11). In #Col 3:11 Paul couples it with Scythian as certainly not Christian. These are (with verse #4 below) the only N.T. instances. {Showed us} (pareican). Imperfect active of parecw with -an instead of -on as eican in #Mr 8:7 (Robertson, _Grammar_, p. 339). It was their habit on this occasion, Luke means, they kept on showing. {No common kindness} (ou ten tucousan filanqrwpian). The old word filanqrwpia (filos, anqrwpos), love of mankind, occurs in the N.T. only here and #Tit 3:4 (adverb in #27:3). See on 19:11 for this use of ou ten tucousan, "not the kindness that happens every day." They were not "wreckers" to take advantage of the calamity. {They kindled a fire} (hayantes puran). The only N.T. example and verse #3 of the old word pura (from pur, fire), a pile of burning fuel (sticks). First aorist active participle of haptw, to set fire to, to kindle. Cf. anaptw in #Lu 12:49. {Received us all} (proselabonto pantas hemas). Second aorist middle (indirect indicative of proslambanw. They took us all to themselves (cf. #Ac 18:26). {The present} (ton efestwta). Second perfect active participle (intransitive) of efistemi, "the rain that stood upon them" (the pouring rain). Only in Luke and Paul in N.T.


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