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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - John 2:10


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    King James Bible - John 2:10

    And saith unto him, Every man at the beginning doth set forth good wine; and when men have well drunk, then that which is worse: but thou hast kept the good wine until now.

    World English Bible

    and said to him, "Everyone serves the good
    wine first, and when the guests have drunk freely, then that which is worse. You have kept the good wine until now!"

    Douay-Rheims - John 2:10

    And saith to him: Every man at first setteth forth good
    wine, and when men have well drunk, then that which is worse. But thou hast kept the good wine until now.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And saith to him, Every man at the beginning presenteth good
    wine; and when men have well drank, then that which is worse: but thou hast kept the good wine until now.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ λεγει 3004 5719 V-PAI-3S αυτω 846 P-DSM πας 3956 A-NSM ανθρωπος 444 N-NSM πρωτον 4412 ADV τον 3588 T-ASM καλον 2570 A-ASM οινον 3631 N-ASM τιθησιν 5087 5719 V-PAI-3S και 2532 CONJ οταν 3752 CONJ μεθυσθωσιν 3184 5686 V-APS-3P τοτε 5119 ADV τον 3588 T-ASM ελασσω 1640 A-ASM-C συ 4771 P-2NS τετηρηκας 5083 5758 V-RAI-2S τον 3588 T-ASM καλον 2570 A-ASM οινον 3631 N-ASM εως 2193 CONJ αρτι 737 ADV

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (10) -
    Ge 43:34 So 5:1

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 2:10

    Y le dice: Todo hombre pone primero el buen vino, y cuando ya estn satisfechos, entonces lo que es peor; mas t has guardado el buen vino hasta ahora.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - John 2:10

    Verse 10. The good
    wine until now.] That which our Lord now made being perfectly pure, and highly nutritive!

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 10. And saith unto him , etc.] The following
    words; expressing the common custom used at feasts: every man at the beginning doth set forth good wine ; that is, it is usual with men, when they make entertainments, first to give the guests the best, the most generous, and strongest bodied wine; as being most suitable for them, and they being then better able to bear it, and it being most for the credit of the maker of the feast: and when men have well drank ; not to excess, but freely, so as that they are exhilarated; and their spirits cheerful, but their brains not intoxicated: so the word, as answering to the Hebrew word is rk , used by the Septuagint in ( Genesis 43:34 Song of Solomon 5:1), then that which is worse ; not bad wine, but ton elassw , that which is lesser; a weaker bodied wine, that is lowered, and of less strength, and not so intoxicating, and which is fittest for the guests. So Martial advises Sextilianus, after he had drank the tenth cup, not to drink the best wine, but to ask his host for wine of Laletania, which was a weaker and lower sort of wine. [But] thou hast kept the good wine until now ; which shows he knew nothing of the miracle wrought. And as the bridegroom here did, in the apprehension of the ruler of the feast, at this his marriage, so does the Lord, the husband of the church, in the marriage feast of the Gospel; and so he will do at the marriage supper of the lamb. The Gospel, which may be compared to wine for its purity, pleasant taste, and generous effects in reviving drooping spirits, refreshing weary persons, and comforting distressed minds, as also for its antiquity, was published before the coming of Christ, in the times of Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, David, and the prophets, but in a lower and weaker way; at sundry times, here a little, and there a little, by piecemeals, as it were; and in divers manners, by promises, prophecies, types, shadows, and sacrifices; and was attended with much darkness and bondage: but under the Gospel dispensation, which is compared to a marriage feast, it is more fully dispensed, more clearly published, and more freely ministered. The whole of it is delivered, and with open face beheld; and saints are made free by it; it is set in the strongest and clearest light; the best wine is reserved till now; God has provided some better thing for us, ( Hebrews 11:40). And so with respect to the future state of the saints, their best things are kept for them till last. They have many good things now; as the Gospel, Gospel ordinances, the blessings, and promises of grace, the love of God shed abroad in their hearts, presence of God, and communion with Christ, at least at times; all which are better than wine: but then there is an alloy to these; they are lowered by other things, as the corruptions of the heart, the temptations of Satan, the hidings of Gods face, and a variety of afflictions; but they shall have their good and best things hereafter, and drink new wine in Christs Fathers kingdom, without any thing to lower and weaken it: they will have full joys, and never fading pleasures, and shall be without sin and sorrow; no more deserted, nor afflicted, and shall be out of the reach of Satans temptations, and with Christ for evermore. Happy are they that are called to the marriage supper of the Lamb.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-11 - It is very desirable when there is a
    marriage, to have Christ own an bless it. Those that would have Christ with them at their marriage must invite him by prayer, and he will come. While in this world we sometimes find ourselves in straits, even when we think ourselves i fulness. There was want at a marriage feast. Those who are come to car for the things of the world, must look for trouble, and count upo disappointment. In our addresses to Christ, we must humbly spread ou case before him, and then refer ourselves to him to do as he pleases In Christ's reply to his mother there was no disrespect. He used the same word when speaking to her with affection from the cross; yet it is a standing testimony against the idolatry of after-ages, in giving undue honours to his mother. His hour is come when we know not what to do. Delays of mercy are not denials of prayer. Those that expec Christ's favours, must observe his orders with ready obedience. The way of duty is the way to mercy; and Christ's methods must not be objecte against. The beginning of Moses' miracles was turning water into blood Ex 7:20; the beginning of Christ's miracles was turning water int wine; which may remind us of the difference between the law of Mose and the gospel of Christ. He showed that he improves creature-comfort to all true believers, and make them comforts indeed. And Christ' works are all for use. Has he turned thy water into wine, given the knowledge and grace? it is to profit withal; therefore draw out now and use it. It was the best wine. Christ's works commend themselve even to those who know not their Author. What was produced by miracles always was the best in its kind. Though Christ hereby allows a righ use of wine, he does not in the least do away his own caution, whic is, that our hearts be not at any time overcharged with surfeiting an drunkenness, Lu 21:34. Though we need not scruple to feast with ou friends on proper occasions, yet every social interview should be s conducted, that we might invite the Redeemer to join with us, if he were now on earth; and all levity, luxury, and excess offend him.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ λεγει 3004 5719 V-PAI-3S αυτω 846 P-DSM πας 3956 A-NSM ανθρωπος 444 N-NSM πρωτον 4412 ADV τον 3588 T-ASM καλον 2570 A-ASM οινον 3631 N-ASM τιθησιν 5087 5719 V-PAI-3S και 2532 CONJ οταν 3752 CONJ μεθυσθωσιν 3184 5686 V-APS-3P τοτε 5119 ADV τον 3588 T-ASM ελασσω 1640 A-ASM-C συ 4771 P-2NS τετηρηκας 5083 5758 V-RAI-2S τον 3588 T-ASM καλον 2570 A-ASM οινον 3631 N-ASM εως 2193 CONJ αρτι 737 ADV

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    10. Have well drunk (mequsqwsi).Wyc., be filled. Tynd., be drunk. The A.V. and Tynd. are better than the Rev. when
    men have drunk freely. The ruler of the feast means that when the palates of the guests have become less sensitive through indulgence, an inferior quality of wine is offered. In every instance of its use in the New Testament the word means intoxication. The attempt of the advocates of the unfermented-wine theory to deny or weaken this sense by citing the well-watered garden (Isaiah lviii. 11; Jer. xxxi. 12) scarcely requires comment. One might answer by quoting Plato, who uses baptizesqai, to be baptized, for being drunk ("Symposium," 176). In the Septuagint the verb repeatedly occurs for watering (Ps. lxv. 9, 10), but always with the sense of drenching or soaking; of being drunken or surfeited with water. In Jer. xlviii. (Sept. 31.) 26, it is found in the literal sense, to be drunken. The metaphorical use of the word has passed into common slang, as when a drunken man is said to be wetted or soaked (so Plato, above). The figurative use of the word in the Septuagint has a parallel in the use of potizw, to give to drink, to express the watering of ground. So Gen. ii. 6, a mist watered the face of the earth, or gave it drink. Compare Gen. xiii. 10; Deuteronomy xi. 10. A curious use of the word occurs in Homer, where he is describing the stretching of a bull's hide, which, in order to make it more elastic, is soaked (mequousan) with fat ("Iliad," xvii. 390).

    Worse (elassw). Literally, smaller. Implying both worse and weaker. Small appears in the same sense in English, as small-beer.

    Hast kept (tethrhkav). See on 1 Pet. i. 4.



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