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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - John 12:27


    CHAPTERS: John 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21     
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    King James Bible - John 12:27

    Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour.

    World English Bible

    "Now my soul is troubled. What shall I say? 'Father, save me from this
    time?' But for this cause I came to this time.

    Douay-Rheims - John 12:27

    Now is my soul troubled. And what shall I say? Father, save me from this
    hour. But for this cause I came unto this hour.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this
    hour: but for this cause I came to this hour.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    νυν
    3568 ADV η 3588 T-NSF ψυχη 5590 N-NSF μου 3450 P-1GS τεταρακται 5015 5769 V-RPI-3S και 2532 CONJ τι 5101 I-ASN ειπω 2036 5632 V-2AAS-1S πατερ 3962 N-VSM σωσον 4982 5657 V-AAM-2S με 3165 P-1AS εκ 1537 PREP της 3588 T-GSF ωρας 5610 N-GSF ταυτης 3778 D-GSF αλλα 235 CONJ δια 1223 PREP τουτο 5124 D-ASN ηλθον 2064 5627 V-2AAI-1S εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF ωραν 5610 N-ASF ταυτην 3778 D-ASF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (27) -
    Joh 11:33-35; 13:21 Ps 69:1-3; 88:3 Isa 53:3 Mt 26:38,39,42

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 12:27

    ¶ Ahora est turbada mi alma; ¿y qu dir? Padre, slvame de esta hora; mas por esto he venido en esta hora.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - John 12:27

    Verse 27. Now is my
    soul troubled] Our blessed Lord took upon him our weaknesses, that he might sanctify them to us. As a man he was troubled at the prospect of a violent death. Nature abhors death: God has implanted that abhorrence in nature, that it might become a principle of self preservation; and it is to this that we owe all that prudence and caution by which we avoid danger. When we see Jesus working miracles which demonstrate his omnipotence, we should be led to conclude that he was not man were it not for such passages as these. The reader must ever remember that it was essentially necessary that he should be man; for, without being such, he could hot have died for the sin of the world.

    And what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour] kai ti eipw; pater, swson me ek thv wrav tauthv? which may be paraphrased thus: And why should I say, Father, save me from this hour? when for this cause I am come to this hour. The common version makes our blessed Lord contradict himself here, by not attending to the proper punctuation of the passage, and by translating the particle ti what, instead of why or how.

    The sense of our Lord's words is this: "When a man feels a fear of a sudden or violent death, it is natural to him to cry out, Father, save me from this death! for he hopes that the glory of God and his welfare may be accomplished some other way, less dreadful to his nature: but why should I say so, seeing for this very purpose, that I might die this violent death for the sins of mankind, I am come into the world, and have almost arrived at the hour of my crucifixion."


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 27. Now is my soul troubled , etc.] At the hardness and unbelief of the Jews, and the rejection of them, when the Gentiles would be called, and converted, by which he would be glorified: and at the conduct and carriage of his disciples to him, he had a foreknowledge of; at the betraying of him by one, and the denial of him by another, and the flight of them all from him; and at the devil, and the furious and violent attack he knew he would make upon him, though he had obliged him to leave him, when he assaulted him before, and knew he could find nothing in him now, and that as God, he was able to destroy him; but this was to be done by him, as man, and by lying too: he was in his human soul troubled at the thoughts of his death, though it was his Fathers will, and he had agreed to it, and was for the salvation of his people, his heart was so much set upon; yet it was terrible to the human nature, and especially as attended with the wrath of God; at the apprehensions of which, his soul was exceedingly troubled; not as about to fall on him on his own personal account, but as being the surety of his people, and as having their sins upon him to satisfy angry and injured justice for: and what shall I say ? this question he puts, as being in the utmost distress, and difficulty, as if he knew not what to say; and yet not as advising with his disciples, what was to be said or done in his case; but is rather used to introduce another question, as the following words may be formed: shall I say, father, save me from this hour ? as requesting his Father, that he might be strengthened under his sufferings and death, and carried through them, and out of them; or rather as deprecating them, desiring the cup might pass from him, as he afterwards did; and then the sense is, shall I put up such a petition to my Father, to save me from sorrows, sufferings, and death? no, I will not: the human nature through frailty might prompt him to it, and he be just going to do it, when he corrects himself, saying; but for this cause came I unto this hour : this hour or time of sorrow and suffering was appointed for him; it was fixed in the covenant of grace, and Christ had agreed to it; he was sent into this world, and he came into it, on account of this hour; and was preserved hitherto for this purpose; and was now come to Jerusalem, and was there at this instant, for that very reason, namely, to suffer and die. And since this was the case, he would not put up such a petition to his Father, but the following one.

    Ver 28. Father, glorify thy name , etc.] The perfections of his nature, particularly his justice and holiness, meaning in himself; by his sufferings and death; intimating hereby, that his Fathers glory was what he had in view, and that the securing of that would give him an infinite pleasure amidst all his sorrows. The Arabic version, and Nonnus, read glorify thy Son, as in ( John 17:1), and the Ethiopic version takes in both, glorify thy name, and thy Son: and indeed, what glorifies the one, glorifies the other; (see John 13:31,32). Then came there a voice from heaven ; as at his baptism and transfiguration, and which came from the Father, and was an articulate one, and what the Jews call Bath Kol, or the daughter of the voice: [saying], I have both, glorified [it] ; meaning in the incarnation, ministry, obedience and miracles of Christ; and particularly in that late one in raising Lazarus from the dead: and will glorify [it] again ; by supporting him under, and carrying him through his sufferings and death, and by raising him from the dead, and setting him at his own right hand.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 27-33 - The sin of our souls was the troubled of Christ's soul, when he undertook to redeem and save us, and to make his soul an offering for our sin. Christ was willing to suffer, yet prayed to be saved from suffering. Prayer against trouble may well agree with patience unde it, and submission to the will of God in it. Our Lord Jesus undertoo to satisfy God's injured honour, and he did it by humbling himself. The voice of the Father from heaven, which had declared him to be his beloved Son, at his baptism, and when he was transfigured, was hear proclaiming that He had both glorified his name, and would glorify it Christ, reconciling the world to God by the merit of his death, brok the power of death, and cast out Satan as a destroyer. Christ, bringin the world to God by the doctrine of his cross, broke the power of sin and cast out Satan as a deceiver. The soul that was at a distance from Christ, is brought to love him and trust him. Jesus was now going to heaven, and he would draw men's hearts to him thither. There is powe in the death of Christ to draw souls to him. We have heard from the gospel that which exalts free grace, and we have heard also that whic enjoins duty; we must from the heart embrace both, and not separat them.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    νυν
    3568 ADV η 3588 T-NSF ψυχη 5590 N-NSF μου 3450 P-1GS τεταρακται 5015 5769 V-RPI-3S και 2532 CONJ τι 5101 I-ASN ειπω 2036 5632 V-2AAS-1S πατερ 3962 N-VSM σωσον 4982 5657 V-AAM-2S με 3165 P-1AS εκ 1537 PREP της 3588 T-GSF ωρας 5610 N-GSF ταυτης 3778 D-GSF αλλα 235 CONJ δια 1223 PREP τουτο 5124 D-ASN ηλθον 2064 5627 V-2AAI-1S εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF ωραν 5610 N-ASF ταυτην 3778 D-ASF

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    27. My
    soul. See reff. on ver. 25. The soul, yuch, is the seat of the human affections; the spirit (pneuma) of the religious affections.

    Is troubled (tetaraktai). The perfect tense; has been disturbed and remains troubled. The same verb as in xi. 33. Notice that there it is said He groaned in the spirit (tw pneumati). His inward agitation did not arise from personal sorrow or sympathy, but from some shock to His moral and spiritual sense.

    What shall I say? A natural expression out of the depths of our Lord's humanity. How shall I express my emotion? Some commentators connect this with the following clause, shall I say, Father, save me, etc. But this does not agree with the context, and represents a hesitation in the mind of Jesus which found no place there. 41 Save me. The shrinking from suffering belongs to the human personality of our Lord (compare Matthew 39); but the prayer, save me from this hour, is not for deliverance from suffering, but for victory in the approaching trial. See Heb. v. 7. The expression is very vivid. "Save me out of this hour."

    For this cause. Explained by glorify thy name. For this use, namely, that the Father's name might be glorified.



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