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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Matthew 19:24


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    King James Bible - Matthew 19:24

    And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.

    World English Bible

    Again I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through a
    needle's eye, than for a rich man to enter into the Kingdom of God."

    Douay-Rheims - Matthew 19:24

    And again I say to you: It is easier for a camel to pass through the
    eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of heaven.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And again I say to you, It is easier for a camel to go through the
    eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    παλιν
    3825 ADV δε 1161 CONJ λεγω 3004 5719 V-PAI-1S υμιν 5213 P-2DP ευκοπωτερον 2123 A-NSN-C εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S καμηλον 2574 N-ASM δια 1223 PREP τρυπηματος 5169 N-GSN ραφιδος 4476 N-GSF διελθειν 1330 5629 V-2AAN η 2228 PRT πλουσιον 4145 A-ASM εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF βασιλειαν 932 N-ASF του 3588 T-GSM θεου 2316 N-GSM εισελθειν 1525 5629 V-2AAN

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 19:24

    Pero os digo, que ms liviano trabajo es pasar un cable por el ojo de una aguja, que el rico entrar en el Reino de Dios.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Matthew 19:24

    Verse 24. A
    camel] Instead of kamhlon, camel, six MSS. read kamilon, cable, a mere gloss inserted by some who did not know that the other was a proverb common enough among the people of the east.

    There is an expression similar to this in the Koran. "The impious, who in his arrogance shall accuse our doctrine of falsity, shall find the gates of heaven shut: nor shall he enter there till a camel shall pass through the eye of a needle. It is thus that we shall recompense the wicked." AL KORAN.

    Surat vii. ver. 37.

    It was also a mode of expression common among the Jews, and signified a thing impossible. Hence this proverb: A camel in Media dances in a cabe; a measure which held about three pints. Again, No man sees a palm tree of gold, nor an elephant passing through the eye of a needle. Because these are impossible things. "Rabbi Shesheth answered Rabbi Amram, who had advanced an absurdity, Perhaps thou art one of the Pembidithians who can make an elephant pass through the eye of a needle; that is, says the Aruch, 'who speak things impossible.'" See Lightfoot and Schoettgen on this place.

    Go through] But instead of dielqein, about eighty MSS. with several versions and fathers, have eiselqein, to enter in; but the difference is of little importance in an English translation, though of some consequence to the elegance of the Greek text.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 23-30 - Though Christ spoke so strongly, few that have riches do not trust in them. How few that are poor are not tempted to envy! But men' earnestness in this matter is like their toiling to build a high wal to shut themselves and their children out of heaven. It should be satisfaction to those who are in a low condition, that they are no exposed to the temptations of a high and prosperous condition. If the live more hardly in this world than the rich, yet, if they get mor easily to a better world, they have no reason to complain. Christ' words show that it is hard for a rich man to be a good Christian, an to be saved. The way to heaven is a narrow way to all, and the gat that leads into it, a strait gate; particularly so to rich people. Mor duties are expected from them than from others, and more sins easil beset them. It is hard not to be charmed with a smiling world. Ric people have a great account to make up for their opportunities abov others. It is utterly impossible for a man that sets his heart upon his riches, to get to heaven. Christ used an expression, denoting difficulty altogether unconquerable by the power of man. Nothing les than the almighty grace of God will enable a rich man to get over thi difficulty. Who then can be saved? If riches hinder rich people, ar not pride and sinful lusts found in those not rich, and as dangerous to them? Who can be saved? say the disciples. None, saith Christ, by an created power. The beginning, progress, and perfecting the work of salvation, depend wholly on the almighty power of God, to which all things are possible. Not that rich people can be saved in their worldliness, but that they should be saved from it. Peter said, We have forsaken all. Alas! it was but a poor all, only a few boats and nets yet observe how Peter speaks, as if it had been some mighty thing. We are too apt to make the most of our services and sufferings, ou expenses and losses, for Christ. However, Christ does not upbraid them though it was but little that they had forsaken, yet it was their all and as dear to them as if it had been more. Christ took it kindly tha they left it to follow him; he accepts according to what a man hath Our Lord's promise to the apostles is, that when the Son of man shal sit on the throne of his glory, he will make all things new, and the shall sit with him in judgement on those who will be judged accordin to their doctrine. This sets forth the honour, dignity, and authorit of their office and ministry. Our Lord added, that every one who ha forsaken possessions or comforts, for his sake and the gospel, would be recompensed at last. May God give us faith to rest our hope on this his promise; then we shall be ready for every service or sacrifice. Ou Saviour, in the last verse, does away a mistake of some. The heavenl inheritance is not given as earthly ones are, but according to God' pleasure. Let us not trust in promising appearances or outwar profession. Others may, for aught we know, become eminent in faith an holiness __________________________________________________________________


    Greek Textus Receptus


    παλιν
    3825 ADV δε 1161 CONJ λεγω 3004 5719 V-PAI-1S υμιν 5213 P-2DP ευκοπωτερον 2123 A-NSN-C εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S καμηλον 2574 N-ASM δια 1223 PREP τρυπηματος 5169 N-GSN ραφιδος 4476 N-GSF διελθειν 1330 5629 V-2AAN η 2228 PRT πλουσιον 4145 A-ASM εις 1519 PREP την 3588 T-ASF βασιλειαν 932 N-ASF του 3588 T-GSM θεου 2316 N-GSM εισελθειν 1525 5629 V-2AAN

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    24. Camel-through a
    needle's eye (kamhlon dia truphmatov rafidov). See on Mark x. 25; Luke xviii. 25. Compare the Jewish proverb, that a man did not even in his dreams see an elephant pass through the eye of a needle. The reason why the camel was substituted for the elephant was because the proverb was from the Babylonian Talmud, and in Babylon the elephant was common, while in Palestine it was unknown. The Koran has the same figure: "The impious shall find the gates of heaven shut; nor shall he enter there till a camel shall pass through the eye of a needle." Bochart, in his history of the animals of scripture, cites a Talmudic passage: "A needle's eye is not too narrow for two friends, nor is the world wide enough for two enemies." The allusion is not to be explained by reference to a narrow gate called a needle's eye.

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    19:24 {It is easier for a
    camel to go through a needle's eye} (eukopwteron estin kamelon dia trematos rhafidos eiselqein). Jesus, of course, means by this comparison, whether an eastern proverb or not, to express the impossible. The efforts to explain it away are jejune like a ship's cable, kamilon or rhafis as a narrow gorge or gate of entrance for camels which recognized stooping, etc. All these are hopeless, for Jesus pointedly calls the thing "impossible" (verse #26). The Jews in the Babylonian Talmud did have a proverb that a man even in his dreams did not see an elephant pass through the eye of a needle (Vincent). The Koran speaks of the wicked finding the gates of heaven shut "till a camel shall pass through the eye of a needle." But the Koran may have got this figure from the New Testament. The word for an ordinary needle is rhafis, but, Luke (#Lu 18:25) employs belone, the medical term for the surgical needle not elsewhere in the N.T.


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