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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Isaiah 41:2


    CHAPTERS: Isaiah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: GEN - BIB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB

    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Isaiah 41:2

    τις 5100 5101 εξηγειρεν απο 575 ανατολων 395 δικαιοσυνην 1343 εκαλεσεν 2564 5656 αυτην 846 κατα 2596 ποδας 4228 αυτου 847 και 2532 πορευσεται 4198 5695 δωσει 1325 5692 εναντιον 1726 εθνων 1484 και 2532 βασιλεις 935 εκστησει και 2532 δωσει 1325 5692 εις 1519 γην 1093 τας 3588 μαχαιρας 3162 αυτων 846 και 2532 ως 5613 φρυγανα εξωσμενα τα 3588 τοξα αυτων 846

    Douay Rheims Bible

    Who hath raised up the just one from the east, hath called him to
    follow him? he shall give the nations in his sight, and he shall rule over kings: he shall give them as the dust to his sword, as stubble driven by the wind, to his bow.

    King James Bible - Isaiah 41:2

    Who raised up the righteous man from the east, called him to his
    foot, gave the nations before him, and made him rule over kings? he gave them as the dust to his sword, and as driven stubble to his bow.

    World English Bible

    Who has raised up one from the east? Who called him to his
    foot in righteousness? He hands over nations to him, and makes him rule over kings. He gives them like the dust to his sword, like the driven stubble to his bow.

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Isaiah 41:2

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-03 v.v.xxxiv Pg 13
    Isa. xlii. 15.

    and “they shall seek water, and they shall find none.”6500

    6500 *marg:


    Anf-01 ix.iv.vii Pg 20
    Jer. x. 11.

    For, from the fact of his having subjoined their destruction, he shows them to be no gods at all. Elias, too, when all Israel was assembled at Mount Carmel, wishing to turn them from idolatry, says to them, “How long halt ye between two opinions?3346

    3346 Literally, “In both houghs,” in ambabus suffraginibus.

    If the Lord be God,3347

    3347 The old Latin translation has, “Si unus est Dominus Deus”—If the Lord God is one; which is supposed by the critics to have occurred through carelessness of the translator.

    follow Him.”3348

    3348


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 25.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 153.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 25.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 153.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.xxxv Pg 8.1


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    and all other things in succession; but neither gods nor angels [had any share in the work].


    Anf-01 viii.vi.xxviii Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    then the sun, and the moon, and the stars. For having learned this in Egypt, and having been much taken with what Moses had written in the Genesis of the world, he fabled that Vulcan had made in the shield of Achilles a kind of representation of the creation of the world. For he wrote thus:2568

    2568 Iliad, xviii. 483.

    “There he described the earth, the heaven, the sea, The sun that rests not, and the moon full-orb’d; There also, all the stars which round about, As with a radiant frontlet, bind the skies.”


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xix Pg 2
    Gen. i. 1.

    for, as they maintain, by naming these four,—God, beginning, heaven, and earth,—he set forth their Tetrad. Indicating also its invisible and hidden nature, he said, “Now the earth was invisible and unformed.”2880

    2880


    Anf-02 iii.ii.v Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 30.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.vii Pg 8.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 17.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.v.iii Pg 11
    Gen. i. 1.

    and as long as He continued making, one after the other, those things of which He was to be the Lord, it merely mentions God.  “And God said,” “and God made,” “and God saw;”6160

    6160


    Anf-03 v.v.xix Pg 6
    Gen. i. 1.

    just as it would have said, “At last God made the heaven and the earth,” if God had created these after all the rest.  Now, if the beginning is a substance, the end must also be material. No doubt, a substantial thing6320

    6320 Substantivum aliquid.

    may be the beginning of some other thing which may be formed out of it; thus the clay is the beginning of the vessel, and the seed is the beginning of the plant. But when we employ the word beginning in this sense of origin, and not in that of order, we do not omit to mention also the name of that particular thing which we regard as the origin of the other. On the other hand,6321

    6321 De cetero.

    if we were to make such a statement as this, for example, “In the beginning the potter made a basin or a water-jug,” the word beginning will not here indicate a material substance (for I have not mentioned the clay, which is the beginning in this sense, but only the order of the work, meaning that the potter made the basin and the jug first, before anything else—intending afterwards to make the rest. It is, then, to the order of the works that the word beginning has reference, not to the origin of their substances. I might also explain this word beginning in another way, which would not, however, be inapposite.6322

    6322 Non ab re tamen.

    The Greek term for beginning, which is ἀρχή, admits the sense not only of priority of order, but of power as well; whence princes and magistrates are called ἀρχοντες. Therefore in this sense too, beginning may be taken for princely authority and power. It was, indeed, in His transcendent authority and power, that God made the heaven and the earth.


    Anf-03 v.v.xx Pg 12
    Gen. i. 1.

    —“and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  All things were made by Him, and without Him nothing was made.”6333

    6333


    Anf-03 v.v.xxii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 1.

    I revere6345

    6345 Adoro: reverently admire.

    the fulness of His Scripture, in which He manifests to me both the Creator and the creation. In the gospel, moreover, I discover a Minister and Witness of the Creator, even His Word.6346

    6346


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 3
    Gen. i. 1.

    The Scripture, which at its very outset proposes to run through the order thereof tells us as its first information that it was created; it next proceeds to set forth what sort of earth it was.6367

    6367 Qualitatem ejus: unless this means “how He made it,” like the “qualiter fecerit” below.

    In like manner with respect to the heaven, it informs us first of its creation—“In the beginning God made the heaven:”6368

    6368


    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 5
    Gen. i. 1.

    it then goes on to introduce its arrangement; how that God both separated “the water which was below the firmament from that which was above the firmament,”6369

    6369


    Anf-03 v.v.xxix Pg 29
    Cum cælo separavit: Gen. i. 1.



    Anf-03 v.v.xxvi Pg 17
    Gen. i. 1, 2.

    —the very same earth, no doubt, which God made, and of which the Scripture had been speaking at that very moment.6381

    6381 Cum maxime edixerat.

    For that very “but6382

    6382 The “autem” of the note just before this.

    is inserted into the narrative like a clasp,6383

    6383 Fibula.

    (in its function) of a conjunctive particle, to connect the two sentences indissolubly together: “But the earth.” This word carries back the mind to that earth of which mention had just been made, and binds the sense thereunto.6384

    6384 Alligat sensum.

    Take away this “but,” and the tie is loosened; so much so that the passage, “But the earth was without form, and void,” may then seem to have been meant for any other earth.


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 8
    Gen. i. 1, 2, and comp. the LXX.

    The first thing, O man, which you have to venerate, is the age of the waters in that their substance is ancient; the second, their dignity, in that they were the seat of the Divine Spirit, more pleasing to Him, no doubt, than all the other then existing elements. For the darkness was total thus far, shapeless, without the ornament of stars; and the abyss gloomy; and the earth unfurnished; and the heaven unwrought: water8557

    8557 Liquor.

    alone—always a perfect, gladsome, simple material substance, pure in itself—supplied a worthy vehicle to God.  What of the fact that waters were in some way the regulating powers by which the disposition of the world thenceforward was constituted by God?  For the suspension of the celestial firmament in the midst He caused by “dividing the waters;”8558

    8558


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.iv Pg 8
    Gen. i.

    not as if He were ignorant of the good until He saw it; but because it was good, He therefore saw it, and honoured it, and set His seal upon it; and consummated2745

    2745 Dispungens, i.e., examinans et probans et ita quasi consummans (Oehler).

    the goodness of His works by His vouchsafing to them that contemplation. Thus God blessed what He made good, in order that He might commend Himself to you as whole and perfect, good both in word and act.2746

    2746 This twofold virtue is very tersely expressed: “Sic et benedicebat quæ benefaciebat.”

    As yet the Word knew no malediction, because He was a stranger to malefaction.2747

    2747 This, the translator fears, is only a clumsy way of representing the terseness of our author’s “maledicere” and “malefacere.”

    We shall see what reasons required this also of God. Meanwhile the world consisted of all things good, plainly foreshowing how much good was preparing for him for whom all this was provided. Who indeed was so worthy of dwelling amongst the works of God, as he who was His own image and likeness? That image was wrought out by a goodness even more operative than its wont,2748

    2748 Bonitas et quidem operantior.

    with no imperious word, but with friendly hand preceded by an almost affable2749

    2749 Blandiente.

    utterance: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”2750

    2750


    Anf-03 v.ix.xii Pg 9
    Gen. i. 6, 7.

    and God also said, “Let there be lights (in the firmament); and so God made a greater and a lesser light.”7901

    7901


    Anf-03 vi.iii.iii Pg 10
    Gen. i. 6, 7, 8.

    the suspension of “the dry land” He accomplished by “separating the waters.” After the world had been hereupon set in order through its elements, when inhabitants were given it, “the waters” were the first to receive the precept “to bring forth living creatures.”8559

    8559 Animas.

    Water was the first to produce that which had life, that it might be no wonder in baptism if waters know how to give life.8560

    8560 Animare.

    For was not the work of fashioning man himself also achieved with the aid of waters?  Suitable material is found in the earth, yet not apt for the purpose unless it be moist and juicy; which (earth) “the waters,” separated the fourth day before into their own place, temper with their remaining moisture to a clayey consistency. If, from that time onward, I go forward in recounting universally, or at more length, the evidences of the “authority” of this element which I can adduce to show how great is its power or its grace; how many ingenious devices, how many functions, how useful an instrumentality, it affords the world, I fear I may seem to have collected rather the praises of water than the reasons of baptism; although I should thereby teach all the more fully, that it is not to be doubted that God has made the material substance which He has disposed throughout all His products8561

    8561 Rebus.

    and works, obey Him also in His own peculiar sacraments; that the material substance which governs terrestrial life acts as agent likewise in the celestial.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxxv Pg 5
    Ps. cxlviii. 1, 2. [Kaye’s citations (chap. ix. p. 181) from Tatian, concerning angels and demons, are valuable aids to the understanding of Justin in his frequent references to this subject.]


    Anf-01 ix.iii.iii Pg 11
    Ps. xxxiii. 9, Ps. cxlviii. 5.

    Whom, therefore, shall we believe as to the creation of the world—these heretics who have been mentioned that prate so foolishly and inconsistently on the subject, or the disciples of the Lord, and Moses, who was both a faithful servant of God and a prophet? He at first narrated the formation of the world in these words: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth,”2996

    2996


    Anf-01 ix.iii.xxxv Pg 8
    Ps. cxlviii. 5, 6.

    And again, He thus speaks respecting the salvation of man: “He asked life of Thee, and Thou gavest him length of days for ever and ever;”3292

    3292


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.iii Pg 15.1


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xv Pg 3
    Gen. ix. 5, 6, LXX.

    and again, “Whosoever will shed man’s blood,4565

    4565 One of the mss. reads here: Sanguis pro sanguine ejus effundetur.

    it shall be shed for his blood.” In like manner, too, did the Lord say to those who should afterwards shed His blood, “All righteous blood shall be required which is shed upon the earth, from the blood of righteous Abel to the blood of Zacharias the son of Barachias, whom ye slew between the temple and the altar. Verily I say unto you, All these things shall come upon this generation.”4566

    4566


    Anf-01 v.xv.ii Pg 6
    Gen. v. 1, Gen. ix. 6.

    And that [the Son of God] was to be made man [Moses shows when] he says, “A prophet shall the Lord raise up unto you of your brethren, like unto me.”1223

    1223


    Anf-03 v.viii.xxxix Pg 9
    Gen. ix. 5, 6.

    He declared it then to be of such a character as the Pharisees had admitted it, and such as the Lord had Himself maintained it, and such too as the Sadducees refused to believe it—such refusal leading them indeed to an absolute rejection of the whole verity. Nor had the Athenians previously understood Paul to announce any other resurrection.7542

    7542


    Anf-03 iv.iv.xv Pg 6
    See Gen. i. 26, 27; ix. 6; and comp. 1 Cor. xi. 7.

    to God; so as to render to Cæsar indeed money, to God yourself. Otherwise, what will be God’s, if all things are Cæsar’s? “Then,” do you say, “the lamps before my doors, and the laurels on my posts are an honour to God?” They are there of course, not because they are an honour to God, but to him who is honour in God’s stead by ceremonial observances of that kind, so far as is manifest, saving the religious performance, which is in secret appertaining to demons. For we ought to be sure if there are any whose notice it escapes through ignorance of this world’s literature, that there are among the Romans even gods of entrances; Cardea (Hinge-goddess), called after hinges, and Forculus (Door-god) after doors, and Limentinus (Threshold-god) after the threshold, and Janus himself (Gate-god) after the gate: and of course we know that, though names be empty and feigned, yet, when they are drawn down into superstition, demons and every unclean spirit seize them for themselves, through the bond of consecration. Otherwise demons have no name individually, but they there find a name where they find also a token. Among the Greeks likewise we read of Apollo Thyræus, i.e. of the door, and the Antelii, or Anthelii, demons, as presiders over entrances. These things, therefore, the Holy Spirit foreseeing from the beginning, fore-chanted, through the most ancient prophet Enoch, that even entrances would come into superstitious use. For we see too that other entrances280

    280 The word is the same as that for “the mouth” of a river, etc. Hence Oehler supposes the “entrances” or “mouths” here referred to to be the mouths of fountains, where nymphs were supposed to dwell. Nympha is supposed to be the same word as Lympha. See Hor. Sat. i. 5, 97; and Macleane’s note.

    are adored in the baths. But if there are beings which are adored in entrances, it is to them that both the lamps and the laurels will pertain. To an idol you will have done whatever you shall have done to an entrance. In this place I call a witness on the authority also of God; because it is not safe to suppress whatever may have been shown to one, of course for the sake of all. I know that a brother was severely chastised, the same night, through a vision, because on the sudden announcement of public rejoicings his servants had wreathed his gates.  And yet himself had not wreathed, or commanded them to be wreathed; for he had gone forth from home before, and on his return had reprehended the deed.  So strictly are we appraised with God in matters of this kind, even with regard to the discipline of our family.281

    281 [He seems to refer to some Providential event, perhaps announced in a dream, not necessarily out of the course of common occurrences.]

    Therefore, as to what relates to the honours due to kings or emperors, we have a prescript sufficient, that it behoves us to be in all obedience, according to the apostle’s precept,282

    282


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 5
    See Ex. xx. 8–; 11 and xii. 16 (especially in the LXX.).

    always, and not only every seventh day, but through all time. And through this arises the question for us, what sabbath God willed us to keep? For the Scriptures point to a sabbath eternal and a sabbath temporal. For Isaiah the prophet says, “Your sabbaths my soul hateth;”1189

    1189


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-01 v.vii.i Pg 6
    Isa. v. 26, Isa. xlix. 22.

    for all ages, through His resurrection, to all His holy and faithful [followers], whether among Jews or Gentiles, in the one body of His Church.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 27
    Isa. v. 26.

    swiftly, because hastening towards the fulness of the times; with speed, because unclogged by the weights of the ancient law. They shall neither hunger nor thirst. Therefore they shall be filled,—a promise which is made to none but those who hunger and thirst. And again He says: “Behold, my servants shall be filled, but ye shall be hungry; behold, my servants shall drink, but ye shall be thirsty.”3959

    3959


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxix Pg 42
    Vel: or, “if you please;” indicating some uncertainty in the quotation. The passage is more like Jer. xv. 14 than anything in Isaiah (see, however, Isa. xxx. 27; 30).

    by Isaiah, “A fire has been kindled in mine anger.” He cannot lie. If it is not He who uttered His voice out of even the burning bush, it can be of no importance4691

    4691 Viderit.

    what fire you insist upon being understood.  Even if it be but figurative fire, yet, from the very fact that he takes from my element illustrations for His own sense, He is mine, because He uses what is mine. The similitude of fire must belong to Him who owns the reality thereof. But He will Himself best explain the quality of that fire which He mentioned, when He goes on to say, “Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division.”4692

    4692


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.viii Pg 30.1


    Npnf-201 iii.xv.ix Pg 22


    Npnf-201 iv.vi.i.xxxviii Pg 12


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 15


    Anf-03 iv.vi.xiii Pg 6
    Ps. xx. 7.

    From so much as a dwelling in that Babylon of John’s Revelation432

    432


    Npnf-201 iii.xvi.i Pg 15


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 26
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Behold how David calleth Him Lord and the Son of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 3
    The reference is to Isa. xlv. 1. A glance at the LXX. will at once explain the difference between the reading of our author and the genuine reading. One letter—an “ι”—makes all the difference. For Κύρῳ has been read Κυρίῳ. In the Eng. ver. we read “His Anointed.”

    whose right hand I have holden, that the nations may hear Him: the powers of kings will I burst asunder; I will open before Him the gates, and the cities shall not be closed to Him.” Which very thing we see fulfilled. For whose right hand does God the Father hold but Christ’s, His Son?—whom all nations have heard, that is, whom all nations have believed,—whose preachers, withal, the apostles, are pointed to in the Psalms of David: “Into the universal earth,” says he, “is gone out their sound, and unto the ends of the earth their words.”1219

    1219


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Likewise, in the same prophet, He says to the Father respecting the Son: “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? We brought a report concerning Him, as if He were a little child, as if He were a root in a dry ground, who had no form nor comeliness.”7891

    7891


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 12
    Here Tertullian reads τῷ Χριστῷ μου Κυρίῳ, instead of Κύρῳ, “to Cyrus,” in Isa. xlv. 1.

    the Lord who speaks to the Father of Christ must be a distinct Being. Moreover, when the apostle in his epistle prays, “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and of knowledge,”8172

    8172


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xi Pg 7
    Isa. xlv. 2, 3.

    And “He shall dwell in a lofty cave of the strong rock.”1597

    1597


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.ix Pg 12.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 26
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Behold how David calleth Him Lord and the Son of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 3
    The reference is to Isa. xlv. 1. A glance at the LXX. will at once explain the difference between the reading of our author and the genuine reading. One letter—an “ι”—makes all the difference. For Κύρῳ has been read Κυρίῳ. In the Eng. ver. we read “His Anointed.”

    whose right hand I have holden, that the nations may hear Him: the powers of kings will I burst asunder; I will open before Him the gates, and the cities shall not be closed to Him.” Which very thing we see fulfilled. For whose right hand does God the Father hold but Christ’s, His Son?—whom all nations have heard, that is, whom all nations have believed,—whose preachers, withal, the apostles, are pointed to in the Psalms of David: “Into the universal earth,” says he, “is gone out their sound, and unto the ends of the earth their words.”1219

    1219


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Likewise, in the same prophet, He says to the Father respecting the Son: “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? We brought a report concerning Him, as if He were a little child, as if He were a root in a dry ground, who had no form nor comeliness.”7891

    7891


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 12
    Here Tertullian reads τῷ Χριστῷ μου Κυρίῳ, instead of Κύρῳ, “to Cyrus,” in Isa. xlv. 1.

    the Lord who speaks to the Father of Christ must be a distinct Being. Moreover, when the apostle in his epistle prays, “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and of knowledge,”8172

    8172


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-01 ix.ii.vi Pg 11
    Isa. xlv. 5, 6, Isa. xlvi. 9.

    <index subject1="Grief, evil spirits said by Valentinus to derive their origin from" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.3"/>They further teach that the spirits of wickedness derived their origin from grief. <index subject1="Cosmocrator, the" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.4"/>Hence the devil, whom they also call Cosmocrator (the ruler of the world), and the demons, and the angels, and every wicked spiritual being that exists, found the source of their existence. They represent the Demiurge as being the son of that mother of theirs (Achamoth), and Cosmocrator as the creature of the Demiurge. Cosmocrator has knowledge of what is above himself, because he is a spirit of wickedness; but the Demiurge is ignorant of such things, inasmuch as he is merely animal. Their mother dwells in that place which is above the heavens, that is, in the intermediate abode; the Demiurge in the heavenly place, that is, in the hebdomad; but the Cosmocrator in this our world. The corporeal elements of the world, again, sprang, as we before remarked, from bewilderment and perplexity, as from a more ignoble source. Thus the earth arose from her state of stupor; water from the agitation caused by her fear; air from the consolidation of her grief; while fire, producing death and corruption, was inherent in all these elements, even as they teach that ignorance also lay concealed in these three passions.


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxx Pg 9
    Ex. xx. 5; Isa. xlv. 5, 6.

    Such are the falsehoods which these people invent.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxi Pg 7
    Jer. viii. 16.

    This, too, is the reason that this tribe is not reckoned in the Apocalypse along with those which are saved.4705

    4705


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 31.3


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 17
    Joel ii. 10; Ps. xcvii. 5.

    who holdeth the whole world in His hand “like a nest;”7976

    7976


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 58.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 16.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 62
    Ps. xlv. 3, 4.

    And whatever other things of a like nature are spoken regarding Him, these indicated that beauty and splendour which exist in His kingdom, along with the transcendent and pre-eminent exaltation [belonging] to all who are under His sway, that those who hear might desire to be found there, doing such things as are pleasing to God. Again, there are those who say, “He is a man, and who shall know him?”4303

    4303


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxviii Pg 0


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 3.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xv Pg 5.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 34
    Ps. xlv. 4 (xliv. 5 in LXX.).

    Who will ply the sword without practising the contraries to lenity and justice; that is, guile, and asperity, and injustice, proper (of course) to the business of battles?  See we, then, whether that which has another action be not another sword,—that is, the Divine word of God, doubly sharpened1279

    1279


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiv Pg 6
    Ps. xlv. 4.

    But who shall produce these results with the sword, and not their opposites rather—deceit, and harshness, and injury—which, it must be confessed, are the proper business of battles? Let us see, therefore, whether that is not some other sword, which has so different an action. Now the Apostle John, in the Apocalypse, describes a sword which proceeded from the mouth of God as “a doubly sharp, two-edged one.”3290

    3290


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiv Pg 12
    Ps. xlv. 4, but changed.

    even the might of Thy spiritual grace, whereby the knowledge of Christ is spread. “Thine arrows are sharp;”3296

    3296 *marg:


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 26
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Behold how David calleth Him Lord and the Son of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 3
    The reference is to Isa. xlv. 1. A glance at the LXX. will at once explain the difference between the reading of our author and the genuine reading. One letter—an “ι”—makes all the difference. For Κύρῳ has been read Κυρίῳ. In the Eng. ver. we read “His Anointed.”

    whose right hand I have holden, that the nations may hear Him: the powers of kings will I burst asunder; I will open before Him the gates, and the cities shall not be closed to Him.” Which very thing we see fulfilled. For whose right hand does God the Father hold but Christ’s, His Son?—whom all nations have heard, that is, whom all nations have believed,—whose preachers, withal, the apostles, are pointed to in the Psalms of David: “Into the universal earth,” says he, “is gone out their sound, and unto the ends of the earth their words.”1219

    1219


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Likewise, in the same prophet, He says to the Father respecting the Son: “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? We brought a report concerning Him, as if He were a little child, as if He were a root in a dry ground, who had no form nor comeliness.”7891

    7891


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 12
    Here Tertullian reads τῷ Χριστῷ μου Κυρίῳ, instead of Κύρῳ, “to Cyrus,” in Isa. xlv. 1.

    the Lord who speaks to the Father of Christ must be a distinct Being. Moreover, when the apostle in his epistle prays, “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and of knowledge,”8172

    8172


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 26
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Behold how David calleth Him Lord and the Son of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 3
    The reference is to Isa. xlv. 1. A glance at the LXX. will at once explain the difference between the reading of our author and the genuine reading. One letter—an “ι”—makes all the difference. For Κύρῳ has been read Κυρίῳ. In the Eng. ver. we read “His Anointed.”

    whose right hand I have holden, that the nations may hear Him: the powers of kings will I burst asunder; I will open before Him the gates, and the cities shall not be closed to Him.” Which very thing we see fulfilled. For whose right hand does God the Father hold but Christ’s, His Son?—whom all nations have heard, that is, whom all nations have believed,—whose preachers, withal, the apostles, are pointed to in the Psalms of David: “Into the universal earth,” says he, “is gone out their sound, and unto the ends of the earth their words.”1219

    1219


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Likewise, in the same prophet, He says to the Father respecting the Son: “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? We brought a report concerning Him, as if He were a little child, as if He were a root in a dry ground, who had no form nor comeliness.”7891

    7891


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 12
    Here Tertullian reads τῷ Χριστῷ μου Κυρίῳ, instead of Κύρῳ, “to Cyrus,” in Isa. xlv. 1.

    the Lord who speaks to the Father of Christ must be a distinct Being. Moreover, when the apostle in his epistle prays, “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and of knowledge,”8172

    8172


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-01 ix.ii.vi Pg 11
    Isa. xlv. 5, 6, Isa. xlvi. 9.

    <index subject1="Grief, evil spirits said by Valentinus to derive their origin from" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.3"/>They further teach that the spirits of wickedness derived their origin from grief. <index subject1="Cosmocrator, the" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.4"/>Hence the devil, whom they also call Cosmocrator (the ruler of the world), and the demons, and the angels, and every wicked spiritual being that exists, found the source of their existence. They represent the Demiurge as being the son of that mother of theirs (Achamoth), and Cosmocrator as the creature of the Demiurge. Cosmocrator has knowledge of what is above himself, because he is a spirit of wickedness; but the Demiurge is ignorant of such things, inasmuch as he is merely animal. Their mother dwells in that place which is above the heavens, that is, in the intermediate abode; the Demiurge in the heavenly place, that is, in the hebdomad; but the Cosmocrator in this our world. The corporeal elements of the world, again, sprang, as we before remarked, from bewilderment and perplexity, as from a more ignoble source. Thus the earth arose from her state of stupor; water from the agitation caused by her fear; air from the consolidation of her grief; while fire, producing death and corruption, was inherent in all these elements, even as they teach that ignorance also lay concealed in these three passions.


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxx Pg 9
    Ex. xx. 5; Isa. xlv. 5, 6.

    Such are the falsehoods which these people invent.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxi Pg 7
    Jer. viii. 16.

    This, too, is the reason that this tribe is not reckoned in the Apocalypse along with those which are saved.4705

    4705


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 31.3


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 17
    Joel ii. 10; Ps. xcvii. 5.

    who holdeth the whole world in His hand “like a nest;”7976

    7976


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 58.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 16.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 62
    Ps. xlv. 3, 4.

    And whatever other things of a like nature are spoken regarding Him, these indicated that beauty and splendour which exist in His kingdom, along with the transcendent and pre-eminent exaltation [belonging] to all who are under His sway, that those who hear might desire to be found there, doing such things as are pleasing to God. Again, there are those who say, “He is a man, and who shall know him?”4303

    4303


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxviii Pg 0


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 3.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xv Pg 5.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 34
    Ps. xlv. 4 (xliv. 5 in LXX.).

    Who will ply the sword without practising the contraries to lenity and justice; that is, guile, and asperity, and injustice, proper (of course) to the business of battles?  See we, then, whether that which has another action be not another sword,—that is, the Divine word of God, doubly sharpened1279

    1279


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiv Pg 6
    Ps. xlv. 4.

    But who shall produce these results with the sword, and not their opposites rather—deceit, and harshness, and injury—which, it must be confessed, are the proper business of battles? Let us see, therefore, whether that is not some other sword, which has so different an action. Now the Apostle John, in the Apocalypse, describes a sword which proceeded from the mouth of God as “a doubly sharp, two-edged one.”3290

    3290


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiv Pg 12
    Ps. xlv. 4, but changed.

    even the might of Thy spiritual grace, whereby the knowledge of Christ is spread. “Thine arrows are sharp;”3296

    3296


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 58.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 16.1


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cii Pg 2
    Gen. iii. 15.

    Could He not have at once created a multitude of men? <index subject1="Angels" subject2="their freedom" title="250" id="viii.iv.cii-p2.2"/><index subject1="Free-will in man and angels" title="250" id="viii.iv.cii-p2.3"/><index subject1="Man" subject2="his creation" title="250" id="viii.iv.cii-p2.4"/>But yet, since He knew that it would be good, He created both angels and men free to do that which is righteous, and He appointed periods of time during which He knew it would be good for them to have the exercise of free-will; and because He likewise knew it would be good, He made general and particular judgments; each one’s freedom of will, however, being guarded. Hence Scripture says the following, at the destruction of the tower, and division and alteration of tongues: ‘And the Lord said, Behold, the people is one, and they have all one language; and this they have begun to do: and now nothing will be restrained from them of all which they have attempted to do.’2338

    2338


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xli Pg 14
    Gen. iii. 15.

    And the Lord summed up in Himself this enmity, when He was made man from a woman, and trod upon his [the serpent’s] head, as I have pointed out in the preceding book.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxii Pg 3
    Gen. iii. 15.

    For from that time, He who should be born of a woman, [namely] from the Virgin, after the likeness of Adam, was preached as keeping watch for the head of the serpent. This is the seed of which the apostle says in the Epistle to the Galatians, “that the law of works was established until the seed should come to whom the promise was made.”4629

    4629


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Anf-01 ii.ii.x Pg 3
    Gen. xii. 1–3.

    And again, on his departing from Lot, God said to him. “Lift up thine eyes, and look from the place where thou now art, northward, and southward, and eastward, and westward; for all the land which thou seest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed for ever. And I will make thy seed as the dust of the earth, [so that] if a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered.”47

    47


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxii Pg 2
    Gal. iii. 5–9; Gen. xii. 3.

    For which [reasons the apostle] declared that this man was not only the prophet of faith, but also the father of those who from among the Gentiles believe in Jesus Christ, because his faith and ours are one and the same: for he believed in things future, as if they were already accomplished, because of the promise of God; and in like manner do we also, because of the promise of God, behold through faith that inheritance [laid up for us] in the [future] kingdom.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iv Pg 20


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxx Pg 4
    Gen. xlix. 10.

    And it is plain that this was spoken not of Judah, but of Christ. For all we out of all nations do expect not Judah, but Jesus, who led your fathers out of Egypt. For the prophecy referred even to the advent of Christ: ‘Till He come for whom this is laid up, and He shall be the expectation of nations.’ Jesus came, therefore, as we have shown at length, and is expected again to appear above the clouds; whose name you profane, and labour hard to get it profaned over all the earth. It were possible for me, sirs,” I continued, “to contend against you about the reading which you so interpret, saying it is written, ‘Till the things laid up for Him come;’ though the Seventy have not so explained it, but thus, ‘Till He comes for whom this is laid up.’ But since what follows indicates that the reference is to Christ (for it is, ‘and He shall be the expectation of nations’), I do not proceed to have a mere verbal controversy with you, as I have not attempted to establish proof about Christ from the passages of Scripture which are not admitted by you2409

    2409 [Note this important point. He forbears to cite the New Testament.]

    which I quoted from the words of Jeremiah the prophet, and Esdras, and David; but from those which are even now admitted by you, which had your teachers comprehended, be well assured they would have deleted them, as they did those about the death of Isaiah, whom you sawed asunder with a wooden saw. And this was a mysterious type of Christ being about to cut your nation in two, and to raise those worthy of the honour to the everlasting kingdom along with the holy patriarchs and prophets; but He has said that He will send others to the condemnation of the unquenchable fire along with similar disobedient and impenitent men from all the nations. ‘For they shall come,’ He said, ‘from the west and from the east, and shall sit down with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven; but the children of the kingdom shall be cast out into outer darkness.’2410

    2410


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xxxii Pg 2
    Gen. xlix. 10.

    It is yours to make accurate inquiry, and ascertain up to whose time the Jews had a lawgiver and king of their own. Up to the time of Jesus Christ, who taught us, and interpreted the prophecies which were not yet understood, [they had a lawgiver] as was foretold by the holy and divine Spirit of prophecy through Moses, “that a ruler would not fail the Jews until He should come for whom the kingdom was reserved” (for Judah was the forefather of the Jews, from whom also they have their name of Jews); and after He (i.e., Christ) appeared, you began to rule the Jews, and gained possession of all their territory. And the prophecy, “He shall be the expectation of the nations,” signified that there would be some of all nations who should look for Him to come again. And this indeed you can see for yourselves, and be convinced of by fact. For of all races of men there are some who look for Him who was crucified in Judæa, and after whose crucifixion the land was straightway surrendered to you as spoil of war. And the prophecy, “binding His foal to the vine, and washing His robe in the blood of the grape,” was a significant symbol of the things that were to happen to Christ, and of what He was to do. For the foal of an ass stood bound to a vine at the entrance of a village, and He ordered His acquaintances to bring it to Him then; and when it was brought, He mounted and sat upon it, and entered Jerusalem, where was the vast temple of the Jews which was afterwards destroyed by you. And after this He was crucified, that the rest of the prophecy might be fulfilled. <index subject1="Christ Jesus" subject2="blood of" title="173" id="viii.ii.xxxii-p2.2"/>For this “washing His robe in the blood of the grape” was predictive of the passion He was to endure, cleansing by His blood those who believe on Him. For what is called by the Divine Spirit through the prophet “His robe,” are those men who believe in Him in whom abideth the seed1828

    1828 Grabe would here read, not σπέρμα, but πνεῦμα, the spirit; but the Benedictine, Otto, and Trollope all think that no change should be made.

    of God, the Word. And what is spoken of as “the blood of the grape,” signifies that He who should appear would have blood, though not of the seed of man, but of the power of God. <index subject1="Christ Jesus" subject2="called the Word" title="173" id="viii.ii.xxxii-p3.3"/>And the first power after God the Father and Lord of all is the Word, who is also the Son; and of Him we will, in what follows, relate how He took flesh and became man. For as man did not make the blood of the vine, but God, so it was hereby intimated that the blood should not be of human seed, but of divine power, as we have said above. And Isaiah, another prophet, foretelling the same things in other words, spoke thus: “A star shall rise out of Jacob, and a flower shall spring from the root of Jesse; and His arm shall the nations trust.1829

    1829


    Anf-01 v.vi.ix Pg 12
    Gen. xlix. 10.

    have been fulfilled in the Gospel, [our Lord saying,] “Go ye and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.”964

    964


    Anf-01 viii.ii.liv Pg 2
    Gen. xlix. 10.

    The devils, accordingly, when they heard these prophetic words, said that Bacchus was the son of Jupiter, and gave out that he was the discoverer of the vine, and they number wine1883

    1883 In the ms. the reading is οἶνον (wine); but as Justin’s argument seems to require ὄνον (an ass), Sylburg inserted this latter word in his edition; and this reading is approved by Grabe and Thirlby, and adopted by Otto and Trollope. It may be added, that ἀναγράφουσι is much more suitable to ὄνον than to οἶνον.

    [or, the ass] among his mysteries; and they taught that, having been torn in pieces, he ascended into heaven. And because in the prophecy of Moses it had not been expressly intimated whether He who was to come was the Son of God, and whether He would, riding on the foal, remain on earth or ascend into heaven, and because the name of “foal” could mean either the foal of an ass or the foal of a horse, they, not knowing whether He who was foretold would bring the foal of an ass or of a horse as the sign of His coming, nor whether He was the Son of God, as we said above, or of man, gave out that Bellerophon, a man born of man, himself ascended to heaven on his horse Pegasus. And when they heard it said by the other prophet Isaiah, that He should be born of a virgin, and by His own means ascend into heaven, they pretended that Perseus was spoken of. And when they knew what was said, as has been cited above, in the prophecies written aforetime, “Strong as a giant to run his course,”1884

    1884


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lii Pg 2
    [Bible:Gen.49.11 Bible:Gen.49.18 Bible:Gen.49.24">Gen. xlix. 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 18, 24. These texts are frequently referred to by Justin.]

    that there would be two advents of Christ, and that in the first He would suffer, and that after He came there would be neither prophet nor king in your nation (I proceeded), and that the nations who believed in the suffering Christ would look for His future appearance. And for this reason the Holy Spirit had uttered these truths in a parable, and obscurely: for,” I added, “it is said, ‘Judah, thy brethren have praised thee: thy hands [shall be] on the neck of thine enemies; the sons of thy father shall worship thee. Judah is a lion’s whelp; from the germ, my son, thou art sprung up. Reclining, he lay down like a lion, and like [a lion’s] whelp: who shall raise him up? A ruler shall not depart from Judah, or a leader from his thighs, until that which is laid up in store for him shall come; and he shall be the desire of nations, binding his foal to the vine, and the foal of his ass to the tendril of the vine. He shall wash his garments in wine, and his vesture in the blood of the grape. His eyes shall be bright with2113

    2113 Or, “in comparison of.”

    wine, and his teeth white like milk.’2114

    2114


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xi Pg 11
    Gen. xlix. 10–12, LXX.

    For, let those who have the reputation of investigating everything, inquire at what time a prince and leader failed out of Judah, and who is the hope of the nations, who also is the vine, what was the ass’s colt [referred to as] His, what the clothing, and what the eyes, what the teeth, and what the wine, and thus let them investigate every one of the points mentioned; and they shall find that there was none other announced than our Lord, Christ Jesus. Wherefore Moses, when chiding the ingratitude of the people, said, “Ye infatuated people, and unwise, do ye thus requite the Lord?”3925

    3925


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cvi Pg 2
    Num. xxiv. 17.

    and another Scripture says, ‘Behold a man; the East is His name.’2358

    2358


    Anf-01 ix.iv.x Pg 12
    Num. xxiv. 17.

    But Matthew says that the Magi, coming from the east, exclaimed “For we have seen His star in the east, and are come to worship Him;”3383

    3383


    Npnf-201 iii.ix.vi Pg 5


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 26
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Behold how David calleth Him Lord and the Son of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 3
    The reference is to Isa. xlv. 1. A glance at the LXX. will at once explain the difference between the reading of our author and the genuine reading. One letter—an “ι”—makes all the difference. For Κύρῳ has been read Κυρίῳ. In the Eng. ver. we read “His Anointed.”

    whose right hand I have holden, that the nations may hear Him: the powers of kings will I burst asunder; I will open before Him the gates, and the cities shall not be closed to Him.” Which very thing we see fulfilled. For whose right hand does God the Father hold but Christ’s, His Son?—whom all nations have heard, that is, whom all nations have believed,—whose preachers, withal, the apostles, are pointed to in the Psalms of David: “Into the universal earth,” says he, “is gone out their sound, and unto the ends of the earth their words.”1219

    1219


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Likewise, in the same prophet, He says to the Father respecting the Son: “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? We brought a report concerning Him, as if He were a little child, as if He were a root in a dry ground, who had no form nor comeliness.”7891

    7891


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 12
    Here Tertullian reads τῷ Χριστῷ μου Κυρίῳ, instead of Κύρῳ, “to Cyrus,” in Isa. xlv. 1.

    the Lord who speaks to the Father of Christ must be a distinct Being. Moreover, when the apostle in his epistle prays, “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and of knowledge,”8172

    8172


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-01 ix.ii.vi Pg 11
    Isa. xlv. 5, 6, Isa. xlvi. 9.

    <index subject1="Grief, evil spirits said by Valentinus to derive their origin from" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.3"/>They further teach that the spirits of wickedness derived their origin from grief. <index subject1="Cosmocrator, the" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.4"/>Hence the devil, whom they also call Cosmocrator (the ruler of the world), and the demons, and the angels, and every wicked spiritual being that exists, found the source of their existence. They represent the Demiurge as being the son of that mother of theirs (Achamoth), and Cosmocrator as the creature of the Demiurge. Cosmocrator has knowledge of what is above himself, because he is a spirit of wickedness; but the Demiurge is ignorant of such things, inasmuch as he is merely animal. Their mother dwells in that place which is above the heavens, that is, in the intermediate abode; the Demiurge in the heavenly place, that is, in the hebdomad; but the Cosmocrator in this our world. The corporeal elements of the world, again, sprang, as we before remarked, from bewilderment and perplexity, as from a more ignoble source. Thus the earth arose from her state of stupor; water from the agitation caused by her fear; air from the consolidation of her grief; while fire, producing death and corruption, was inherent in all these elements, even as they teach that ignorance also lay concealed in these three passions.


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxx Pg 9
    Ex. xx. 5; Isa. xlv. 5, 6.

    Such are the falsehoods which these people invent.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxi Pg 7
    Jer. viii. 16.

    This, too, is the reason that this tribe is not reckoned in the Apocalypse along with those which are saved.4705

    4705


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 31.3


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 17
    Joel ii. 10; Ps. xcvii. 5.

    who holdeth the whole world in His hand “like a nest;”7976

    7976


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 70.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-03 v.iii.vii Pg 11
    “De enthymesi;” for this word Tertullian gives animationem (in his tract against Valentinus, ix.), which seems to mean, “the mind in operation.” (See the same treatise, x. xi.) With regard to the other word, Jerome (on Amos. iii.) adduces Valentinus as calling Christ ἔκτρωμα, that is, abortion.

    Unhappy Aristotle! who invented for these men dialectics, the art of building up and pulling down; an art so evasive in its propositions,1920

    1920 Sententiis.

    so far-fetched in its conjectures, so harsh, in its arguments, so productive of contentions—embarrassing1921

    1921 Molestam.

    even to itself, retracting everything, and really treating of1922

    1922 Tractaverit, in the sense of conclusively settling.

    nothing! Whence spring those “fables and endless genealogies,”1923

    1923


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxi Pg 7
    Jer. viii. 16.

    This, too, is the reason that this tribe is not reckoned in the Apocalypse along with those which are saved.4705

    4705


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 31.3


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 17
    Joel ii. 10; Ps. xcvii. 5.

    who holdeth the whole world in His hand “like a nest;”7976

    7976


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 26
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Behold how David calleth Him Lord and the Son of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 3
    The reference is to Isa. xlv. 1. A glance at the LXX. will at once explain the difference between the reading of our author and the genuine reading. One letter—an “ι”—makes all the difference. For Κύρῳ has been read Κυρίῳ. In the Eng. ver. we read “His Anointed.”

    whose right hand I have holden, that the nations may hear Him: the powers of kings will I burst asunder; I will open before Him the gates, and the cities shall not be closed to Him.” Which very thing we see fulfilled. For whose right hand does God the Father hold but Christ’s, His Son?—whom all nations have heard, that is, whom all nations have believed,—whose preachers, withal, the apostles, are pointed to in the Psalms of David: “Into the universal earth,” says he, “is gone out their sound, and unto the ends of the earth their words.”1219

    1219


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Likewise, in the same prophet, He says to the Father respecting the Son: “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? We brought a report concerning Him, as if He were a little child, as if He were a root in a dry ground, who had no form nor comeliness.”7891

    7891


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 12
    Here Tertullian reads τῷ Χριστῷ μου Κυρίῳ, instead of Κύρῳ, “to Cyrus,” in Isa. xlv. 1.

    the Lord who speaks to the Father of Christ must be a distinct Being. Moreover, when the apostle in his epistle prays, “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and of knowledge,”8172

    8172


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 26
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Behold how David calleth Him Lord and the Son of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 3
    The reference is to Isa. xlv. 1. A glance at the LXX. will at once explain the difference between the reading of our author and the genuine reading. One letter—an “ι”—makes all the difference. For Κύρῳ has been read Κυρίῳ. In the Eng. ver. we read “His Anointed.”

    whose right hand I have holden, that the nations may hear Him: the powers of kings will I burst asunder; I will open before Him the gates, and the cities shall not be closed to Him.” Which very thing we see fulfilled. For whose right hand does God the Father hold but Christ’s, His Son?—whom all nations have heard, that is, whom all nations have believed,—whose preachers, withal, the apostles, are pointed to in the Psalms of David: “Into the universal earth,” says he, “is gone out their sound, and unto the ends of the earth their words.”1219

    1219


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Likewise, in the same prophet, He says to the Father respecting the Son: “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? We brought a report concerning Him, as if He were a little child, as if He were a root in a dry ground, who had no form nor comeliness.”7891

    7891


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 12
    Here Tertullian reads τῷ Χριστῷ μου Κυρίῳ, instead of Κύρῳ, “to Cyrus,” in Isa. xlv. 1.

    the Lord who speaks to the Father of Christ must be a distinct Being. Moreover, when the apostle in his epistle prays, “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and of knowledge,”8172

    8172


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-01 ix.ii.vi Pg 11
    Isa. xlv. 5, 6, Isa. xlvi. 9.

    <index subject1="Grief, evil spirits said by Valentinus to derive their origin from" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.3"/>They further teach that the spirits of wickedness derived their origin from grief. <index subject1="Cosmocrator, the" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.4"/>Hence the devil, whom they also call Cosmocrator (the ruler of the world), and the demons, and the angels, and every wicked spiritual being that exists, found the source of their existence. They represent the Demiurge as being the son of that mother of theirs (Achamoth), and Cosmocrator as the creature of the Demiurge. Cosmocrator has knowledge of what is above himself, because he is a spirit of wickedness; but the Demiurge is ignorant of such things, inasmuch as he is merely animal. Their mother dwells in that place which is above the heavens, that is, in the intermediate abode; the Demiurge in the heavenly place, that is, in the hebdomad; but the Cosmocrator in this our world. The corporeal elements of the world, again, sprang, as we before remarked, from bewilderment and perplexity, as from a more ignoble source. Thus the earth arose from her state of stupor; water from the agitation caused by her fear; air from the consolidation of her grief; while fire, producing death and corruption, was inherent in all these elements, even as they teach that ignorance also lay concealed in these three passions.


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxx Pg 9
    Ex. xx. 5; Isa. xlv. 5, 6.

    Such are the falsehoods which these people invent.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxi Pg 7
    Jer. viii. 16.

    This, too, is the reason that this tribe is not reckoned in the Apocalypse along with those which are saved.4705

    4705


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 31.3


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 17
    Joel ii. 10; Ps. xcvii. 5.

    who holdeth the whole world in His hand “like a nest;”7976

    7976


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 15.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 58.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 16.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 62
    Ps. xlv. 3, 4.

    And whatever other things of a like nature are spoken regarding Him, these indicated that beauty and splendour which exist in His kingdom, along with the transcendent and pre-eminent exaltation [belonging] to all who are under His sway, that those who hear might desire to be found there, doing such things as are pleasing to God. Again, there are those who say, “He is a man, and who shall know him?”4303

    4303


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxxviii Pg 0


    Anf-02 iv.ii.ii.x Pg 3.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.vi.xv Pg 5.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 34
    Ps. xlv. 4 (xliv. 5 in LXX.).

    Who will ply the sword without practising the contraries to lenity and justice; that is, guile, and asperity, and injustice, proper (of course) to the business of battles?  See we, then, whether that which has another action be not another sword,—that is, the Divine word of God, doubly sharpened1279

    1279


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiv Pg 6
    Ps. xlv. 4.

    But who shall produce these results with the sword, and not their opposites rather—deceit, and harshness, and injury—which, it must be confessed, are the proper business of battles? Let us see, therefore, whether that is not some other sword, which has so different an action. Now the Apostle John, in the Apocalypse, describes a sword which proceeded from the mouth of God as “a doubly sharp, two-edged one.”3290

    3290


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiv Pg 12
    Ps. xlv. 4, but changed.

    even the might of Thy spiritual grace, whereby the knowledge of Christ is spread. “Thine arrows are sharp;”3296

    3296


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.iii Pg 11.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.xii Pg 26
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Behold how David calleth Him Lord and the Son of God.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 3
    The reference is to Isa. xlv. 1. A glance at the LXX. will at once explain the difference between the reading of our author and the genuine reading. One letter—an “ι”—makes all the difference. For Κύρῳ has been read Κυρίῳ. In the Eng. ver. we read “His Anointed.”

    whose right hand I have holden, that the nations may hear Him: the powers of kings will I burst asunder; I will open before Him the gates, and the cities shall not be closed to Him.” Which very thing we see fulfilled. For whose right hand does God the Father hold but Christ’s, His Son?—whom all nations have heard, that is, whom all nations have believed,—whose preachers, withal, the apostles, are pointed to in the Psalms of David: “Into the universal earth,” says he, “is gone out their sound, and unto the ends of the earth their words.”1219

    1219


    Anf-03 v.ix.xi Pg 18
    Isa. xlv. 1.

    Likewise, in the same prophet, He says to the Father respecting the Son: “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed? We brought a report concerning Him, as if He were a little child, as if He were a root in a dry ground, who had no form nor comeliness.”7891

    7891


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxviii Pg 12
    Here Tertullian reads τῷ Χριστῷ μου Κυρίῳ, instead of Κύρῳ, “to Cyrus,” in Isa. xlv. 1.

    the Lord who speaks to the Father of Christ must be a distinct Being. Moreover, when the apostle in his epistle prays, “That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and of knowledge,”8172

    8172


    Anf-03 iv.ix.vii Pg 6
    See Isa. xlv. 1, 2 (especially in Lowth’s version and the LXX.).

    opened. Although there be withal a spiritual sense to be affixed to these expressions,—that the hearts of individuals, blockaded in various ways by the devil, are unbarred by the faith of Christ,—still they have been evidently fulfilled, inasmuch as in all these places dwells the “people” of the Name of Christ. For who could have reigned over all nations but Christ, God’s Son, who was ever announced as destined to reign over all to eternity? For if Solomonreigned,” why, it was within the confines of Judea merely:  “from Beersheba unto Dan” the boundaries of his kingdom are marked.1222

    1222


    Anf-01 ix.ii.vi Pg 11
    Isa. xlv. 5, 6, Isa. xlvi. 9.

    <index subject1="Grief, evil spirits said by Valentinus to derive their origin from" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.3"/>They further teach that the spirits of wickedness derived their origin from grief. <index subject1="Cosmocrator, the" title="323" id="ix.ii.vi-p11.4"/>Hence the devil, whom they also call Cosmocrator (the ruler of the world), and the demons, and the angels, and every wicked spiritual being that exists, found the source of their existence. They represent the Demiurge as being the son of that mother of theirs (Achamoth), and Cosmocrator as the creature of the Demiurge. Cosmocrator has knowledge of what is above himself, because he is a spirit of wickedness; but the Demiurge is ignorant of such things, inasmuch as he is merely animal. Their mother dwells in that place which is above the heavens, that is, in the intermediate abode; the Demiurge in the heavenly place, that is, in the hebdomad; but the Cosmocrator in this our world. The corporeal elements of the world, again, sprang, as we before remarked, from bewilderment and perplexity, as from a more ignoble source. Thus the earth arose from her state of stupor; water from the agitation caused by her fear; air from the consolidation of her grief; while fire, producing death and corruption, was inherent in all these elements, even as they teach that ignorance also lay concealed in these three passions.


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxx Pg 9
    Ex. xx. 5; Isa. xlv. 5, 6.

    Such are the falsehoods which these people invent.


    Anf-01 ix.vii.xxxi Pg 7
    Jer. viii. 16.

    This, too, is the reason that this tribe is not reckoned in the Apocalypse along with those which are saved.4705

    4705


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 31.3


    Anf-03 v.ix.xvi Pg 17
    Joel ii. 10; Ps. xcvii. 5.

    who holdeth the whole world in His hand “like a nest;”7976

    7976


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ii Pg 26
    i.e., nephew. See Gen. xi. 31; xii. 5.

    of Abraham, proves that it was for the merits of righteousness, without observance of the law, that he was freed from the conflagration of the Sodomites.1161

    1161


    Anf-01 ii.ii.x Pg 3
    Gen. xii. 1–3.

    And again, on his departing from Lot, God said to him. “Lift up thine eyes, and look from the place where thou now art, northward, and southward, and eastward, and westward; for all the land which thou seest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed for ever. And I will make thy seed as the dust of the earth, [so that] if a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered.”47

    47


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Npnf-201 iii.vii.xix Pg 21


    Anf-01 ii.ii.x Pg 3
    Gen. xii. 1–3.

    And again, on his departing from Lot, God said to him. “Lift up thine eyes, and look from the place where thou now art, northward, and southward, and eastward, and westward; for all the land which thou seest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed for ever. And I will make thy seed as the dust of the earth, [so that] if a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered.”47

    47


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxii Pg 2
    Gal. iii. 5–9; Gen. xii. 3.

    For which [reasons the apostle] declared that this man was not only the prophet of faith, but also the father of those who from among the Gentiles believe in Jesus Christ, because his faith and ours are one and the same: for he believed in things future, as if they were already accomplished, because of the promise of God; and in like manner do we also, because of the promise of God, behold through faith that inheritance [laid up for us] in the [future] kingdom.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iv Pg 20


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.vii Pg 17.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 3
    See Gen. xii.–xv. compared with xvii. and Rom. iv.

    nor yet did he observe the Sabbath. For he had “accepted”1163

    1163


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 5
    There is, if the text be genuine, some confusion here.  Melchizedek does not appear to have been, in any sense, “subsequent” to Abraham, for he probably was senior to him; and, moreover, Abraham does not appear to have been “already circumcised” carnally when Melchizedek met him. Comp. Gen. xiv. with Gen. xvii.

    “But again,” (you say) “the son of Moses would upon one occasion have been choked by an angel, if Zipporah,1165

    1165


    Npnf-201 iii.vii.xix Pg 17


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 41

    VERSE 	(2) - 

    :25; 45:13; 46:11 Ge 11:31; 12:1-3; 17:1 Heb 11:8-10


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET