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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 17:22


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    King James Bible - Acts 17:22

    Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars' hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious.

    World English Bible

    Paul stood in the middle of the Areopagus, and said, "You
    men of Athens, I perceive that you are very religious in all things.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 17:22

    But Paul
    standing in the midst of the Areopagus, said: Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things you are too superstitious.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars-hill, and said, Ye
    men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    σταθεις
    2476 5685 V-APP-NSM δε 1161 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM παυλος 3972 N-NSM εν 1722 PREP μεσω 3319 A-DSN του 3588 T-GSM αρειου 697 N-GSM παγου 697 N-GSM εφη 5346 5713 V-IXI-3S ανδρες 435 N-VPM αθηναιοι 117 A-VPM κατα 2596 PREP παντα 3956 A-APN ως 5613 ADV δεισιδαιμονεστερους 1174 A-APM-C υμας 5209 P-2AP θεωρω 2334 5719 V-PAI-1S

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (22) -
    :19

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 17:22

    ¶ Estando pues Pablo en medio del Arepago, dijo: Varones atenienses, en todo os veo como ms superticiosos;

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 17:22

    Verse 22.
    Paul stood in the midst of Mars' hill] That is, in the midst of the judges, who sat in the Areopagus.

    Ye are too superstitious.] kata panta wv deisidaimonesterouv umav qewrw; I perceive that in all respects ye are greatly addicted to religious practices; and, as a religious people, you will candidly hear what I have got to say in behalf of that worship which I practice and recommend. See farther observations at the end of the chapter.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 22. Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars hill , etc.] Or of Areopagus, as it is better rendered in ( Acts 17:19) for it is the same place, and it is the same word that is here used: Paul stood in the midst of that court of judicature, amidst the Areopagites, the judges of that court, and the wise and learned philosophers of the different sects that were assembled together: and said, ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious ; or more religious, than any other persons, in other places, which has been observed before on ( Acts 17:16) they had more gods, and more altars, and more festivals, and were more diligent and studious in the worship of the gods, than others. And this manner of addressing them, both as citizens of Athens, and as very religious persons, and who, as such, greatly exceeded all others, must greatly tend to engage their attention to him.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 22-31 - Here we have a sermon to heathens, who worshipped false gods, and wer without the true
    God in the world; and to them the scope of the discourse was different from what the apostle preached to the Jews. I the latter case, his business was to lead his hearers by prophecies an miracles to the knowledge of the Redeemer, and faith in him; in the former, it was to lead them, by the common works of providence, to know the Creator, and worship Him. The apostle spoke of an altar he ha seen, with the inscription, "TO THE UNKNOWN GOD." This fact is state by many writers. After multiplying their idols to the utmost, some a Athens thought there was another god of whom they had no knowledge. An are there not many now called Christians, who are zealous in their devotions, yet the great object of their worship is to them an unknow God? Observe what glorious things Paul here says of that God whom he served, and would have them to serve. The Lord had long borne with idolatry, but the times of this ignorance were now ending, and by his servants he now commanded all men every where to repent of their idolatry. Each sect of the learned men would feel themselves powerfull affected by the apostle's discourse, which tended to show the emptines or falsity of their doctrines.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    σταθεις
    2476 5685 V-APP-NSM δε 1161 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM παυλος 3972 N-NSM εν 1722 PREP μεσω 3319 A-DSN του 3588 T-GSM αρειου 697 N-GSM παγου 697 N-GSM εφη 5346 5713 V-IXI-3S ανδρες 435 N-VPM αθηναιοι 117 A-VPM κατα 2596 PREP παντα 3956 A-APN ως 5613 ADV δεισιδαιμονεστερους 1174 A-APM-C υμας 5209 P-2AP θεωρω 2334 5719 V-PAI-1S

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    22. I perceive (qewrw). I regard you, in my careful observation of you. See on
    Luke x. 18.

    Too superstitious (deisidaimonesterouv). This rendering and that of the Rev., somewhat superstitious, are both unfortunate. The word is compounded of deidw, to fear, and daimwn, a deity. It signifies either a religious or a superstitious sentiment, according to the context. Paul would have been unlikely to begin his address with a charge which would have awakened the anger of his audience. What he means to say is, You are more divinity-fearing than the rest of the Greeks. This propensity to reverence the higher powers is a good thing in itself, only, as he shows them, it is misdirected, not rightly conscious of its object and aim. Paul proposes to guide the sentiment rightly by revealing him whom they ignorantly worship. The American revisers insist on very religious. The kindred word deisidaimonia occurs ch. xxv. 19, and in the sense of religion, though rendered in A.V. superstition. Festus would not call the Jewish religion a superstition before Agrippa, who was himself a Jew. There is the testimony of the Ephesian town-clerk, that Paul, during his three years' residence at Ephesus, did not rudely and coarsely attack the worship of the Ephesian Diana. "Nor yet blasphemers of your goddess" (Acts xix. 37).


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    17:22 {Stood in the midst of the Areopagus} (staqeis en meswi tou areiou pagou). First aorist passive of histemi used of Peter in #2:14. Majestic figure whether on Mars Hill or in the stoa Basilica before the Areopagus Court. There would be a crowd of spectators and philosophers in either case and Paul seized the opportunity to preach Christ to this strange audience as he did in Caesarea before Herod Agrippa and the crowd of prominent people gathered by Festus for the entertainment. Paul does not speak as a man on trial, but as one trying to get a hearing for the gospel of Christ. {Somewhat superstitious} (hws deisidaimonesterous). The Authorized Version has "too superstitious," the American Standard "very religious." deisidaimwn is a neutral word (from deidw, to fear, and daimwn, deity). The Greeks used it either in the good sense of pious or religious or the bad sense of superstitious. Thayer suggests that Paul uses it "with kindly ambiguity." Page thinks that Luke uses the word to represent the religious feeling of the Athenians (_religiosus_) which bordered on superstition. The Vulgate has _superstitiosiores_. In #25:19 Festus uses the term deisidaimonia for "religion." It seems unlikely that Paul should give this audience a slap in the face at the very start. The way one takes this adjective here colors Paul's whole speech before the Council of Areopagus. The comparative here as in verse #21 means more religions than usual (Robertson, _Grammar_, pp. 664f.), the object of the comparison not being expressed. The Athenians had a tremendous reputation for their devotion to religion, "full of idols" (verse #16).


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