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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 17:21


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    King James Bible - Acts 17:21

    (For all the Athenians and strangers which were there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell, or to hear some new thing.)

    World English Bible

    Now all the Athenians and the strangers
    living there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 17:21

    (Now all the Athenians, and strangers that were there, employed themselves in nothing else, but either in telling or in
    hearing some new thing.)

    Webster's Bible Translation

    (For all the Athenians and strangers who were there, spent their
    time in nothing else, but either to tell, or to hear some new thing.)

    Greek Textus Receptus


    αθηναιοι
    117 A-NPM δε 1161 CONJ παντες 3956 A-NPM και 2532 CONJ οι 3588 T-NPM επιδημουντες 1927 5723 V-PAP-NPM ξενοι 3581 A-NPM εις 1519 PREP ουδεν 3762 A-ASN ετερον 2087 A-ASN ευκαιρουν 2119 5707 V-IAI-3P η 2228 PRT λεγειν 3004 5721 V-PAN τι 5100 X-ASN και 2532 CONJ ακουειν 191 5721 V-PAN καινοτερον 2537 A-ASN

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (21) -
    Eph 5:16 Col 4:5 2Th 3:11,12 1Ti 5:13 2Ti 2:16,17

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 17:21

    (Entonces todos los atenienses y los huspedes extranjeros, ninguna otra cosa entendían, sino en decir o en oír alguna cosa nueva.)

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 17:21

    Verse 21. All the Athenians and
    strangers which were there] As Athens was renovated for its wisdom and learning, it became a place of public resort for philosophers and students from different parts of the then civilized world. The flux of students was in consequence great; and these, having much leisure time, would necessarily be curious to know what was passing in the world, and would frequently assemble together, in places of public resort, to meet with strangers just come to the city; and either, as St. Luke says, to tell or hear some new thing.

    "The Athenian writers give the same account of their fellow citizens.

    DEMOSTHENES, in his reply to Epist. Philippi, represents the Athenians as punqanomenoi kata thn agoran, ei ti legetai newteron; inquiring, in the place of public resort, if there are any NEWS. We find, likewise, that when Thucydides, iii. 38, had said, meta kainothtov men logou apatasqai aristoi, Ye are excellent in suffering yourselves to be deceived by NOVELTY of speech, the old scholiast makes this remark upon it, (almost in the words of St. Luke,) tauta prov touv. aqhnoiouv ainittetai, ouden ti meletwntav, plhn legein ti kai akouein kainon; He here blames the Athenians, who made it their only business to tell and hear something that was NEW."-Bp. Pearce. This is a striking feature of the city of London in the present day. The itch for news, which generally argues a worldly, shallow, or unsettled mind, is wonderfully prevalent: even ministers of the Gospel, negligent of their sacred function, are become in this sense Athenians; so that the book of God is neither read nor studied with half the avidity and spirit as a newspaper. These persons, forgetful not only of their calling, but of the very spirit of the Gospel, read the account of a battle with the most violent emotions; and, provided the victory falls to their favourite side, they exult and triumph in proportion to the number of thousands that have been slain! It is no wonder if such become political preachers, and their sermons be no better than husks for swine. To such the hungry sheep look up, and are not fed. God pity such miserable Athenians, and direct them to a more suitable employment!


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 21. For all the Athenians , etc.] The natives of Athens, who were born and lived there, and were inhabitants of the city, and free of it: and strangers which were there ; who came there from several parts of the world, to get wisdom and knowledge, to learn the several arts and sciences, and to attend the several sects of philosophers they made choice of: spent their time in nothing else but either to tell or to hear some new thing ; that is, they did so for the most part; and this was the complexion and taste of the generality of them; and with this agrees what Demosthenes himself says of them f877 , we, says he (for the truth shall be said), sit here, ouden poiountev , doing nothing inquiring in the court, ei ti legetai newteron , whether any new thing is said. The character of such persons is given, and they are described in a very lively manner by Theophrastus f878 . The Jewish doctors, at this time, were much of the same cast in their divinity schools; the usual question asked, when they met one another, was, wdj hm , what new thing have you in the divinity school today f879 ?

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 16-21 - Athens was then
    famed for polite learning, philosophy, and the fin arts; but none are more childish and superstitious, more impious, or more credulous, than some persons, deemed eminent for learning an ability. It was wholly given to idolatry. The zealous advocate for the cause of Christ will be ready to plead for it in all companies, a occasion offers. Most of these learned men took no notice of Paul; but some, whose principles were the most directly contrary to Christianity made remarks upon him. The apostle ever dwelt upon two points, whic are indeed the principal doctrines of Christianity, Christ and a futur state; Christ our way, and heaven our end. They looked on this as very different from the knowledge for many ages taught and professed a Athens; they desire to know more of it, but only because it was new an strange. They led him to the place where judges sat who inquired int such matters. They asked about Paul's doctrine, not because it wa good, but because it was new. Great talkers are always busy-bodies They spend their time in nothing else, and a very uncomfortable accoun they have to give of their time who thus spend it. Time is precious and we are concerned to employ it well, because eternity depends upo it, but much is wasted in unprofitable conversation.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    αθηναιοι
    117 A-NPM δε 1161 CONJ παντες 3956 A-NPM και 2532 CONJ οι 3588 T-NPM επιδημουντες 1927 5723 V-PAP-NPM ξενοι 3581 A-NPM εις 1519 PREP ουδεν 3762 A-ASN ετερον 2087 A-ASN ευκαιρουν 2119 5707 V-IAI-3P η 2228 PRT λεγειν 3004 5721 V-PAN τι 5100 X-ASN και 2532 CONJ ακουειν 191 5721 V-PAN καινοτερον 2537 A-ASN

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    21. All the Athenians. No article. Lit., "Athenians, all of them." The Athenian people collectively.

    Strangers which were there (oi epidhmountev xenoi). Rev., more correctly, the strangers sojourning there. See on 1 Pet. i. 1.

    Spent their time (eukairoun). The word means to have good opportunity; to have leisure: also, to devote one's leisure to something; to spend the time. Compare Mark vi. 31; 1 Cor. xvi. 12.

    Something new (ti kainoteron). Lit., newer: newer than that which was then passing current as new. The comparative was regularly used by the Greeks in the question what news? They contrasted what was new with what had been new up to the time of asking. The idiom vividly characterizes the state of the Athenian mind. Bengel aptly says, "New things at once became of no account; newer things were being sought for." Their own orators and poets lashed them for this peculiarity.

    Aristophanes styles Athens the city of the gapers ("Knights," 1262). Demades said that the crest of Athens ought to be a great tongue.

    Demosthenes asks them, "Is it all your care to go about up and down the market, asking each other, 'Is there any news?'" In the speech of Cleon to the Athenians, given by Thucydides (iii., 38), he says: "No men are better dupes, sooner deceived by novel notions, or slower to follow approved advice. You despise what is familiar, while you are worshippers of every new extravagance. You are always hankering after an ideal state, but you do not give your minds even to what is straight before you. In a word, you are at the mercy of your own ears."


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    17:21 {Spent their time} (eukairoun). Imperfect active of eukairew. A late word to have opportunity (eu, kairos) from Polybius on. In the N.T. only here and #Mr 6:31. They had time for,.etc. this verse is an explanatory parenthesis by Luke. {Some new thing} (ti kainoteron). Literally "something newer" or "fresher" than the new, the very latest, the comparative of kainos. Demosthenes (_Philipp_. 1. 43) pictures the Athenians "in the agora inquiring if anything newer is said" (punqanomenoi kata ten agoran ei ti legetai newteron). The new soon became stale with these itching and frivolous Athenians.


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