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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Luke 19:14


    CHAPTERS: Luke 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48

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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Luke 19:14

    οι 3588 δε 1161 πολιται 4177 αυτου 846 εμισουν 3404 5707 αυτον 846 και 2532 απεστειλαν 649 5656 πρεσβειαν 4242 οπισω 3694 αυτου 846 λεγοντες 3004 5723 ου 3756 θελομεν 2309 5719 τουτον 5126 βασιλευσαι 936 5658 εφ 1909 ημας 2248

    Douay Rheims Bible

    But his citizens hated him: and they sent an embassage after him, saying: We will not have this man to reign
    over us.

    King James Bible - Luke 19:14

    But his citizens hated him, and sent a message after him, saying, We will not have this man to reign
    over us.

    World English Bible

    But his citizens hated him, and sent an envoy after him, saying, 'We don't want this man to reign
    over us.'

    Early Church Father Links

    Anf-04 vi.v.iii.iv Pg 26, Anf-09 iv.iii.xxxi Pg 54, Anf-09 xvi.ii.vii.xii Pg 17, Npnf-213 iii.ix.iii Pg 21, Npnf-213 iii.ix.iii Pg 19

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Luke 19:14

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xliv Pg 8
    4. Epiphanius mentions sundry slight alterations in capp. v. 14, 24, vi. 5, 17. In chap. viii. 19 he expunged ἡ μήτηρ αὐτοῦ, καὶ ἀδελφοὶ αὐτοῦ. From Tertullian’s remarks (chap. xix.), it would seem at first as if Marcion had added to his Gospel that answer of our Saviour which we find related by St. Matthew, chap. xii. 48: “Who is my mother, and who are my brethren?” For he represents Marcion (as in De carne Christi, vii., he represents other heretics, who deny the nativity) as making use of these words for his favourite argument. But, after all, Marcion might use these words against those who allowed the authenticity of Matthew’s Gospel, without inserting them in his own Gospel; or else Tertullian might quote from memory, and think that to be in Luke which was only in Matthew—as he has done at least in three instances. (Lardner refers two of these instances to passages in chap. vii. of this Book iv., where Tertullian mentions, as erasures from Luke, what really are found in Matthew v. 17 and xv. 24. The third instance referred to by Lardner probably occurs at the end of chap. ix. of this same Book iv., where Tertullian again mistakes Matt. v. 17 for a passage of Luke, and charges Marcion with expunging it; curiously enough, the mistake recurs in chap. xii of the same Book.) In Luke x. 21 Marcion omitted the first πάτερ and the words καὶ τῆς γῆς, that he might not allow Christ to call His Father the Lord of earth, or of this world. The second πατήρ in this verse, not open to any inconvenience, he retained. In chap. xi. 29 he omitted the last words concerning the sign of the prophet Jonah; he also omitted all the 30th, 31st, and 32d; in ver. 42 he read κλῆσιν, ‘calling,’ instead of κρίσινjudgment.’ He rejected verses 49, 50, 51, because the passage related to the prophets. He entirely omitted chap. xii. 6; whilst in ver. 8 he read ἔμπροσθεν τοῦ Θεοῦ instead of ἔμπροσθεν τῶν ἀγγέλων τοῦ Θεοῦ. He seems to have left out all the 28th verse, and expunged ὑμῶν from verses 30 and 32, reading only ὁ πατήρ. In ver. 38, instead of the words ἐν τῇ δευτέρᾳ φυλακῇ, καὶ ἐν τῇ τρίτῃ φυλακῇ, he read ἐν τῇ ἑσπερινῇ φυλακῇ. In chap. xiii. he omitted the first five verses, whilst in the 28th verse of the same chapter, where we read, “When ye shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, and ye yourselves thrust out,” he read (by altering, adding, and transposing), “When ye shall see all the just in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves cast out, and bound without, there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” He likewise excluded all the remaining verses of this chapter. All chap. xv. after the 10th verse, in which is contained the parable of the prodigal son, he eliminated from his Gospel. In xvii. 10 he left out all the words after λέγετε. He made many alterations in the story of the ten lepers; he left out part of ver. 12, all of ver. 13, and altered ver. 14, reading thus: “There met Him ten lepers; and He sent them away, saying, Show yourselves to the priest;” after which he inserted a clause from chap. iv. 27: “There were many lepers in the days of Eliseus the prophet, but none of them were cleansed, but Naaman the Syrian.” In chap. xviii. 19 he added the words ὁ πατήρ, and in ver. 20 altered οἶδας, thou knowest, into the first person. He entirely omitted verses 31–33, in which our blessed Saviour declares that the things foretold by the prophets concerning His sufferings, and death, and resurrection, should all be fulfilled. He expunged nineteen verses out of chap. xix., from the end of ver. 27 to the beginning of ver. 47. In chap. xx. he omitted ten verses, from the end of ver. 8 to the end of ver. 18. He rejected also verses 37 and 38, in which there is a reference to Moses. Marcion also erased of chap. xxi. the first eighteen verses, as well as verses 21 and 22, on account of this clause, “that all things which are written may be fulfilled;” xx. 16 was left out by him, so also verses 35–; 37, 50, and 51 (and, adds Lardner, conjecturally, not herein following his authority Epiphanius, also vers. 38 and 49). In chap. xxiii. 2, after the words “perverting the nation,” Marcion added, “and destroying the law and the prophets;” and again, after “forbidding to give tribute unto Cæsar,” he added, “and perverting women and children.” He also erased ver. 43. In chap. xxiv. he omitted that part of the conference between our Saviour and the two disciples going to Emmaus, which related to the prediction of His sufferings, and which is contained in verses 26 and 27. These two verses he omitted, and changed the words at the end of ver. 25, ἐλάλησαν οἱ προφῆται, into ἐλάλησα ὑμῖν. Such are the alterations, according to Epiphanius, which Marcion made in his Gospel from St. Luke. Tertullian says (in the 4th chapter of the preceding Book) that Marcion erased the passage which gives an account of the parting of the raiment of our Saviour among the soldiers. But the reason he assigns for the erasure—‘respiciens Psalmi prophetiam’—shows that in this, as well as in the few other instances which we have already named, where Tertullian has charged Marcion with so altering passages, his memory deceived him into mistaking Matthew for Luke, for the reference to the passage in the Psalm is only given by St. Matthew xxvii. 35.


    Anf-01 v.iii.iii Pg 15
    1 Sam. viii. 7.

    And Moses declares, “For their murmuring is not against us, but against the Lord God.”656

    656


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 38
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    in order that thenceforward man might be justified by the liberty of faith, not by servitude to the law,5303

    5303


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xlii Pg 10
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    The heathen were Pilate and the Romans; the people were the tribes of Israel; the kings were represented in Herod, and the rulers in the chief priests. When, indeed, He was sent to Herod gratuitously5129

    5129 Velut munus. This is a definition, in fact, of the xenium in the verse from Hosea. This ξένιον was the Roman lautia, “a state entertainment to distinguished foreigners in the city.”

    by Pilate,5130

    5130


    Anf-03 v.viii.xx Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 1, 2.

    He, again, was “led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a sheep before the shearer,” that is, Herod, “is dumb, so He opened not His mouth.”7399

    7399


    Npnf-201 iii.vi.iii Pg 13


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xl Pg 3
    Ps. i., Ps. ii.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xxii Pg 9
    Comp. Ps. ii. 2, 3, with Acts iv. 25–30.

    What did the apostles thereupon suffer? You answer:  Every sort of iniquitous persecutions, from men that belonged indeed to that Creator who was the adversary of Him whom they were preaching. Then why does the Creator, if an adversary of Christ, not only predict that the apostles should incur this suffering, but even express His displeasure3407

    3407 Exprobrat.

    thereat? For He ought neither to predict the course of the other god, whom, as you contend, He knew not, nor to have expressed displeasure at that which He had taken care to bring about. “See how the righteous perisheth, and no man layeth it to heart; and how merciful men are taken away, and no man considereth. For the righteous man has been removed from the evil person.”3408

    3408


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iii Pg 37
    Ps. ii. 3.

    since the time when “the nations became tumultuous, and the people imagined vain counsels;” when “the kings of the earth stood up, and the rulers were gathered together against the Lord, and against His Christ,”5302

    5302


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iv Pg 40
    Ps. ii. 3; 2.

    All those, therefore, who had been delivered from the yoke of slavery he would earnestly have to obliterate the very mark of slavery—even circumcision, on the authority of the prophet’s prediction. He remembered how that Jeremiah had said, “Circumcise the foreskins of your heart;”5359

    5359


    Anf-03 v.iv.ii.xxi Pg 6
    Ps. ii. 3, 1, 2.

    And, indeed, if another god were preached by Paul, there could be no doubt about the law, whether it were to be kept or not, because of course it would not belong to the new lord, the enemy2568

    2568 Æmulum.

    of the law. The very newness and difference of the god would take away not only all question about the old and alien law, but even all mention of it.  But the whole question, as it then stood, was this, that although the God of the law was the same as was preached in Christ, yet there was a disparagement2569

    2569 Derogaretur.

    of His law. Permanent still, therefore, stood faith in the Creator and in His Christ; manner of life and discipline alone fluctuated.2570

    2570 Nutabat.

    Some disputed about eating idol sacrifices, others about the veiled dress of women, others again about marriage and divorce, and some even about the hope of the resurrection; but about God no one disputed. Now, if this question also had entered into dispute, surely it would be found in the apostle, and that too as a great and vital point. No doubt, after the time of the apostles, the truth respecting the belief of God suffered corruption, but it is equally certain that during the life of the apostles their teaching on this great article did not suffer at all; so that no other teaching will have the right of being received as apostolic than that which is at the present day proclaimed in the churches of apostolic foundation. You will, however, find no church of apostolic origin2571

    2571 Census.

    but such as reposes its Christian faith in the Creator.2572

    2572 In Creatore christianizet.

    But if the churches shall prove to have been corrupt from the beginning, where shall the pure ones be found? Will it be amongst the adversaries of the Creator? Show us, then, one of your churches, tracing its descent from an apostle, and you will have gained the day.2573

    2573 Obduxeris. For this sense of the word, see Apol. 1. sub init. “sed obducimur,” etc.

    Forasmuch then as it is on all accounts evident that there was from Christ down to Marcion’s time no other God in the rule of sacred truth2574

    2574 Sacramenti.

    than the Creator, the proof of our argument is sufficiently established, in which we have shown that the god of our heretic first became known by his separation of the gospel and the law.  Our previous position2575

    2575 Definito.

    is accordingly made good, that no god is to be believed whom any man has devised out of his own conceits; except indeed the man be a prophet,2576

    2576 That is, “inspired.”

    and then his own conceits would not be concerned in the matter. If Marcion, however, shall be able to lay claim to this inspired character, it will be necessary for it to be shown. There must be no doubt or paltering.2577

    2577 Nihil retractare oportebat.

    For all heresy is thrust out by this wedge of the truth, that Christ is proved to be the revealer of no God else but the Creator.2578

    2578 [Kaye, p. 274.]



    Anf-03 iv.ix.iv Pg 9
    I am not acquainted with any such passage. Oehler refers to Isa. xlix. in his margin, but gives no verse, and omits to notice this passage of the present treatise in his index.

    Thus, therefore, before this temporal sabbath, there was withal an eternal sabbath foreshown and foretold; just as before the carnal circumcision there was withal a spiritual circumcision foreshown. In short, let them teach us, as we have already premised, that Adam observed the sabbath; or that Abel, when offering to God a holy victim, pleased Him by a religious reverence for the sabbath; or that Enoch, when translated, had been a keeper of the sabbath; or that Noah the ark-builder observed, on account of the deluge, an immense sabbath; or that Abraham, in observance of the sabbath, offered Isaac his son; or that Melchizedek in his priesthood received the law of the sabbath.


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 19

    VERSE 	(14) - 

    :27 1Sa 8:7 Ps 2:1-3 Isa 49:7 Zec 11:8 Joh 1:11; 15:18,23,24


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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