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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - John 11:35


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    King James Bible - John 11:35

    Jesus wept.

    World English Bible

    Jesus wept.

    Douay-Rheims - John 11:35

    And Jesus wept.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Jesus wept.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    εδακρυσεν
    1145 5656 V-AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM ιησους 2424 N-NSM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (35) -
    :33 Ge 43:30 Job 30:25 Ps 35:13-15; 119:136 Isa 53:3; 63:9

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 11:35

    Y llor Jess.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - John 11:35

    Verse 35.
    Jesus wept.] The least verse in the Bible, yet inferior to none.

    Some of the ruthless ancients, improperly styled fathers of the Church, thought that weeping was a degradation of the character of Christ; and therefore, according to the testimony of Epiphanius, Anchorat. c. 13, razed out of the Gospel of St. Luke the place (Luke xix. 41) where Christ is said to have wept over Jerusalem.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 35. Jesus wept .] As he was going along to the grave, (see John 11:28); as he was meditating upon the state of his friend Lazarus, the distress his two sisters were in, and the greater damnation that would befall the Jews then present, who, notwithstanding the miracle, would not believe in him. This shows him to be truly and really man, subject to like passions, only without sin.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 33-46 -
    Christ's tender sympathy with these afflicted friends, appeared by the troubles of his spirit. In all the afflictions of believers he is afflicted. His concern for them was shown by his kind inquiry after the remains of his deceased friend. Being found in fashion as a man, he acts in the way and manner of the sons of men. It was shown by his tears. He was a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief. Tears of compassion resemble those of Christ. But Christ never approved tha sensibility of which many are proud, while they weep at mere tales of distress, but are hardened to real woe. He sets us an example to withdraw from scenes of giddy mirth, that we may comfort the afflicted And we have not a High Priest who cannot be touched with a feeling of our infirmities. It is a good step toward raising a soul to spiritual life, when the stone is taken away, when prejudices are removed, an got over, and way is made for the word to enter the heart. If we tak Christ's word, and rely on his power and faithfulness, we shall see the glory of God, and be happy in the sight. Our Lord Jesus has taught us by his own example, to call God Father, in prayer, and to draw nigh to him as children to a father, with humble reverence, yet with holy boldness. He openly made this address to God, with uplifted eyes an loud voice, that they might be convinced the Father had sent him as his beloved Son into the world. He could have raised Lazarus by the silen exertion of his power and will, and the unseen working of the Spirit of life; but he did it by a loud call. This was a figure of the gospe call, by which dead souls are brought out of the grave of sin: and of the sound of the archangel's trumpet at the last day, with which all that sleep in the dust shall be awakened, and summoned before the grea tribunal. The grave of sin and this world, is no place for those who Christ has quickened; they must come forth. Lazarus was thoroughl revived, and returned not only to life, but to health. The sinne cannot quicken his own soul, but he is to use the means of grace; the believer cannot sanctify himself, but he is to lay aside every weigh and hinderance. We cannot convert our relatives and friends, but we should instruct, warn, and invite them.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    εδακρυσεν
    1145 5656 V-AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM ιησους 2424 N-NSM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    35. Wept (edakrusen). A different verb from that in ver. 31. From dakru, tear, and meaning to shed
    tears, to weep silently. Only here in the New Testament. Klaiw, to weep audibly, is once used of our Lord in Luke xix. 41. "The very Gospel in which the deity of Jesus is most clearly asserted, is also that which makes us best acquainted with the profoundly human side of His life" (Godet). How far such a conception of deity is removed from the pagan ideal, may be seen by even a superficial study of the classics. Homer's gods and goddesses weep and bellow when wounded, but are not touched with the feeling of human infirmity 37 (see on iii. 16). "The gods," says Gladstone, "while they dispense afflictions upon earth, which are neither sweetened by love, nor elevated by a distinct disciplinary purpose, take care to keep themselves beyond all touch of grief or care."

    "The gods ordain The lot of man to suffer, while themselves Are free from care." "Iliad," xxiv., 525.

    So Diana, when appealed to by the wretched Hippolytus for sympathy, replies:

    "I see thy love, but must not shed a tear." Euripides, "Hippolytes," 1396.

    The Roman satirist unconsciously bears witness to the profound truthfulness and beauty of this picture of the weeping Savior, in the words: "Nature confesses that she gives the tenderest of hearts to the human race by giving them tears: this is the best part of our sensations" (Juvenal, "Satire" xv. 131-133).



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