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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - John 11:44


    CHAPTERS: John 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21     

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    King James Bible - John 11:44

    And he that was dead came forth, bound hand and foot with graveclothes: and his face was bound about with a napkin. Jesus saith unto them, Loose him, and let him go.

    World English Bible

    He who was dead came out, bound
    hand and foot with wrappings, and his face was wrapped around with a cloth. Jesus said to them, "Free him, and let him go."

    Douay-Rheims - John 11:44

    And presently he that had been dead came forth, bound
    feet and hands with winding bands; and his face was bound about with a napkin. Jesus said to them: Loose him, and let him go.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And he that was dead came forth, bound
    hand and foot with grave-clothes: and his face was bound about with a napkin. Jesus saith to them, Loose him, and let him go.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ εξηλθεν 1831 5627 V-2AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM τεθνηκως 2348 5761 V-RAP-NSM δεδεμενος 1210 5772 V-RPP-NSM τους 3588 T-APM ποδας 4228 N-APM και 2532 CONJ τας 3588 T-APF χειρας 5495 N-APF κειριαις 2750 N-DPF και 2532 CONJ η 3588 T-NSF οψις 3799 N-NSF αυτου 846 P-GSM σουδαριω 4676 N-DSN περιεδεδετο 4019 5718 V-LPI-3S λεγει 3004 5719 V-PAI-3S αυτοις 846 P-DPM ο 3588 T-NSM ιησους 2424 N-NSM λυσατε 3089 5657 V-AAM-2P αυτον 846 P-ASM και 2532 CONJ αφετε 863 5628 V-2AAM-2P υπαγειν 5217 5721 V-PAN

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (44) -
    :25,26; 5:21,25; 10:30 Ge 1:3 1Sa 2:6 Ps 33:9 Eze 37:3-10 Ho 13:14

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 11:44

    Entonces el que había estado muerto, sali, atadas las manos y los pies con vendas; y su rostro estaba envuelto en un sudario. Les dice Jess: Desatadle, y dejadle ir.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - John 11:44

    Verse 44. Bound
    hand and foot with grave-clothes] Swathed about with rollers-keiriaiv, from keirw, I cut. These were long slips of linen a few inches in breadth, with which the body and limbs of the dead were swathed, and especially those who were embalmed, that the aromatics might be kept in contact with the flesh. But as it is evident that Lazarus had not been embalmed, it is probable that his limbs were not swathed together, as is the constant case with those who are embalmed, but separately, so that he could come out of the tomb at the command of Christ, though he could not walk freely till the rollers were taken away.

    But some will have it that he was swathed exactly like a mummy, and that his coming out in that state was another miracle. But there is no need of multiplying miracles in this case: there was one wrought which was a most sovereign proof of the unlimited power and goodness of God. Several of the primitive fathers have adduced this resurrection of Lazarus as the model, type, proof, and pledge of the general resurrection of the dead.

    Loose him, and let him go.] He would have the disciples and those who were at hand take part in this business, that the fullest conviction might rest on every person's mind concerning the reality of what was wrought.

    He whom the grace of Christ converts and restores to life comes forth, at his call, from the dark, dismal grave of sin, in which his soul has long been buried: he walks, according to the command of Christ, in newness of life; and gives, by the holiness of his conduct, the fullest proof to all his acquaintance that he is alive from the dead.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 44. And he that was dead came forth , etc.] That is, he who had been dead, being now made alive, and raised up, and set on his feet, came out of the cave: bound hand and foot with grave clothes ; not that his hands were bound together, and much less his hands and feet together, with any bands or lists of cloth; but his whole body, as Nonnus expresses it, was bound with grave clothes from head to foot, according to the manner of the eastern countries, Jews, Egyptians, and others, who used to wrap up their dead in many folds of linen cloth, as infants are wrapped in swaddling bands: and their manner was to let down their arms and hands close by their sides, and wind up altogether from head to foot: so that there was another miracle besides that of raising him from the dead; that in such a situation, in which he could have no natural use of his hands and feet, he should rise up, stand on his feet, walk, and come forth thus bound, out of the cave: and his face was bound about with a napkin ; the use of which was not only to tie up the chin and jaws, but to hide the grim and ghastly looks of a dead corpse; and one of the same price and value was used by rich and poor: for it is said f519 , the wise men introduced a custom of using rdws , a napkin, (the very word here used, which Nonnus says is Syriac,) of the same value, not exceeding a penny, that he might not be ashamed who had not one so good as another; and they cover the faces of the dead, that they might not shame the poor, whose faces were black with famine.

    For it seems f520 , formerly they used to uncover the faces of the rich, and cover the faces of the poor, because their faces were black through want, and the poor were ashamed; wherefore they ordered, that they should cover the faces of all, for the honour of the poor. Jesus saith unto them ; to the servants that stood by: loose him, and let him go ; unwind the linen rolls about him, and set his hands and feet at liberty, and let him go to his own house.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 33-46 - Christ's tender sympathy with these afflicted friends, appeared by the troubles of his spirit. In all the afflictions of believers he is afflicted. His concern for them was shown by his kind inquiry after the remains of his deceased friend. Being found in fashion as a man, he acts in the way and manner of the sons of men. It was shown by his tears. He was a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief. Tears of compassion resemble those of Christ. But Christ never approved tha sensibility of which many are proud, while they weep at mere tales of distress, but are hardened to real woe. He sets us an example to withdraw from scenes of giddy mirth, that we may comfort the afflicted And we have not a High Priest who cannot be touched with a feeling of our infirmities. It is a good step toward raising a soul to spiritual life, when the stone is taken away, when prejudices are removed, an got over, and way is made for the word to enter the heart. If we tak Christ's word, and rely on his power and faithfulness, we shall see the glory of God, and be happy in the sight. Our Lord Jesus has taught us by his own example, to call God Father, in prayer, and to draw nigh to him as children to a father, with humble reverence, yet with holy boldness. He openly made this address to God, with uplifted eyes an loud voice, that they might be convinced the Father had sent him as his beloved Son into the world. He could have raised Lazarus by the silen exertion of his power and will, and the unseen working of the Spirit of life; but he did it by a loud call. This was a figure of the gospe call, by which dead souls are brought out of the grave of sin: and of the sound of the archangel's trumpet at the last day, with which all that sleep in the dust shall be awakened, and summoned before the grea tribunal. The grave of sin and this world, is no place for those who Christ has quickened; they must come forth. Lazarus was thoroughl revived, and returned not only to life, but to health. The sinne cannot quicken his own soul, but he is to use the means of grace; the believer cannot sanctify himself, but he is to lay aside every weigh and hinderance. We cannot convert our relatives and friends, but we should instruct, warn, and invite them.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ εξηλθεν 1831 5627 V-2AAI-3S ο 3588 T-NSM τεθνηκως 2348 5761 V-RAP-NSM δεδεμενος 1210 5772 V-RPP-NSM τους 3588 T-APM ποδας 4228 N-APM και 2532 CONJ τας 3588 T-APF χειρας 5495 N-APF κειριαις 2750 N-DPF και 2532 CONJ η 3588 T-NSF οψις 3799 N-NSF αυτου 846 P-GSM σουδαριω 4676 N-DSN περιεδεδετο 4019 5718 V-LPI-3S λεγει 3004 5719 V-PAI-3S αυτοις 846 P-DPM ο 3588 T-NSM ιησους 2424 N-NSM λυσατε 3089 5657 V-AAM-2P αυτον 846 P-ASM και 2532 CONJ αφετε 863 5628 V-2AAM-2P υπαγειν 5217 5721 V-PAN

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    44. Grave-clothes (keiriaiv). Literally, swathing-bands. Only here in the New Testament. In xix. 40; xx. 5, 7, ojqonia, linen
    bands, is used. A napkin (soudari.w). See on Luke xix. 20.

    It is interesting to compare this Gospel picture of sisterly affection under the shadow of death, with the same sentiment as exhibited in Greek tragedy, especially in Sophocles, by whom it is developed with wonderful power, both in the "Antigone" and in the "Electra."

    In the former, Antigone, the consummate female figure of the Greek drama, falls a victim to her love for her dead brother. Both here, and in the "Electra," sisterly love is complicated with another and sterner sentiment: in the "Antigone" with indignant defiance of the edict which refuses burial to her brother; in the "Electra" with the long-cherished craving for vengeance. Electra longs for her absent brother Orestes, as the minister of retribution rather than as the solace of loneliness and sorrow. His supposed death is to her, therefore, chiefly the defeat of the passionate, deadly purpose of her whole life. Antigone lives for her kindred, and is sustained under her own sad fate by the hope of rejoining them in the next world. She believes in the permanence of personal existence.

    "And yet I go and feed myself with hopes That I shall meet them, by my father loved, Dear to my mother, well-beloved of thee, Thou darling brother" (897-900).

    And again, "Loved, I shall be with him whom I have loved Guilty of holiest crime. More time is mine In which to share the favor of the dead, Than that of those who live; for I shall rest Forever there" (73-76).

    No such hope illuminates the grief of Electra.

    "Ah, Orestes! Dear brother, in thy death thou slayest me; For thou art gone, bereaving my poor heart Of all the little hope that yet remained That thou wouldst come, a living minister Of vengeance for thy father and for me" (807-812).

    And again, "If thou suggestest any hope from those So clearly gone to Hades, then on me, Wasting with sorrow, thou wilt trample more" (832-834).

    When she is asked, "What! shall I ever bring the dead to life?" she replies, "I meant not that: I am not quite so mad."

    In the household of Bethany, the grief of the two sisters, unlike that of the Greek maidens, is unmixed with any other sentiment, save perhaps a tinge of a feeling bordering on reproach that Jesus had not been there to avert their calamity. Comfort from the hope of reunion with the dead is not expressed by them, and is hardly implied in their assertion of the doctrine of a future resurrection, which to them, is a general matter having little or no bearing on their personal grief. In this particular, so far as expression indicates, the advantage is on the side of the Theban maiden. Though her hope is the outgrowth of her affection rather than of her religious training - a thought which is the child of a wish - she never loses her grasp upon the expectation of rejoining her beloved dead.

    But the gospel story is thrown into strongest contrast with the classical by the truth of resurrection which dominates it in the person and energy of the Lord of life. Jesus enters at once as the consolation of bereaved love, and the eternal solution of the problem of life and death. The idea which Electra sneered at as madness, is here a realized fact. Beautiful, wonderful as is the action which the drama evolves out of the conflict of sisterly love with death, the curtain falls on death as victor. Into the gospel story Jesus brings a benefaction, a lesson, and a triumph. His warm sympathy, His comforting words, His tears at His friend's tomb, are in significant contrast with the politic, timid, at times reproachful attitude of the chorus of Theban elders towards Antigone. The consummation of both dramas is unmitigated horror. Suicide solves the problem for Antigone, and Electra receives back her brother as from the dead, only to incite him to murder, and to gloat with him over the victims. It is a beautiful feature of the Gospel narrative that it seems, if we may so speak, to retire with an instinctive delicacy from the joy of that reunited household. It breaks off abruptly with the words, "Loose him, and let him go." The imagination alone follows the sisters with their brother, perchance with Christ, behind the closed door, and hears the sacred interchanges of that wonderful communing. Tennyson, with a deep and truly Christian perception, has struck its key-note.

    "Her eyes are homes of silent prayer, Nor other thought her mind admits But, he was dead, and there he sits! And He that brought him back is there. Then one deep love doth supersede All other, when her ardent gaze Roves from the living brother's face And rests upon the Life indeed." "In Memoriam."



    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57

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