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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - John 4:6


    CHAPTERS: John 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21     

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    King James Bible - John 4:6

    Now Jacob's well was there. Jesus therefore, being wearied with his journey, sat thus on the well: and it was about the sixth hour.

    World English Bible

    Jacob's well was there. Jesus therefore, being tired from his journey, sat down by the well. It was about the sixth
    hour.

    Douay-Rheims - John 4:6

    Now Jacob's well was there. Jesus therefore being wearied with his journey, sat thus on the well. It was about the sixth
    hour.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Now Jacob's well was there. Jesus therefore being wearied with his journey, sat thus on the well: and it was about the sixth
    hour.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ην
    2258 5713 V-IXI-3S δε 1161 CONJ εκει 1563 ADV πηγη 4077 N-NSF του 3588 T-GSM ιακωβ 2384 N-PRI ο 3588 T-NSM ουν 3767 CONJ ιησους 2424 N-NSM κεκοπιακως 2872 5761 V-RAP-NSM εκ 1537 PREP της 3588 T-GSF οδοιποριας 3597 N-GSF εκαθεζετο 2516 5711 V-INI-3S ουτως 3779 ADV επι 1909 PREP τη 3588 T-DSF πηγη 4077 N-DSF ωρα 5610 N-NSF ην 2258 5713 V-IXI-3S ωσει 5616 ADV εκτη 1623 A-NSF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (6) -
    Mt 4:2; 8:24 Heb 2:17; 4:15

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 4:6

    Y estaba allí la fuente de Jacob. Pues Jess, cansado del camino, así se sent a la fuente. Era como la hora sexta.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - John 4:6

    Verse 6.
    Jacob's well was there.] Of this well Mr. Maundrell gives the following account. "About one-third of an hour from Naplosa, the ancient Sychar and Sychem, stood Jacob's well. If it be inquired, whether this be the very place, seeing it may be suspected to stand too remote from Sychar for the women to come and draw water, we may answer-that, in all probability, the city extended farther in former times than it does now, as may be conjectured from some pieces of a very thick wall, the remains perhaps of the ancient Sychem, still to be seen not far from hence. Over it stood formerly a large church, erected by the Empress Irene; but of this the voracity of time, assisted by the hands of the Turks, has left nothing but a few foundations remaining. The well is covered at present with an old stone vault, into which you are let down by a very strait hole; and then, removing a broad flat stone, you discover the well itself. It is dug in a firm rock, is about three yards in diameter, and thirty- five in depth, five of which we found full of water. This confutes a story frequently told to travelers, 'That it is dry all the year round, except on the anniversary of that day on which our blessed saviour sat upon it; but then bubbles up with abundance of water.' At this well the narrow valley of Sychem ends, opening itself into a wide field, which probably is part of the ground given by Jacob to his son Joseph. It is watered by a fresh stream, running between it and Sychem, which makes it exceedingly verdant and fruitful." See Maundrell's Travels, 5th edit. p. 62.

    Cutting pools, or making wells for public use, renders a man famous among the Hindoos. So this well had the name of Jacob, because he had digged it, and it was for public use.

    Sat thus] Chrysostom inquires what the particle thus, outwv, means here? and answers, that it simply signifies, he sat not upon a throne, seat, or cushion; but (as the circumstances of the case required) upon the ground. This is a sense which is given to the word in the ancient Greek writers. See Raphelius, Wetstein, and Pearce. It is probably a mere expletive, and is often so used by Josephus. See several examples in Rosenmuller.

    The sixth hour.] About twelve o'clock: see the notes on chap. i. 31. The time is noted here: 1. To account for Christ's fatigue-he had already traveled several hours. 2. To account for his thirst-the sun had at this time waxed hot. 3. To account for the disciples going to buy food, ver. 8, because this was the ordinary time of dinner among the Jews. See the note referred to above. Dr. Macknight thinks the sixth hour to be the Roman six o'clock in the afternoon. See note on chap. i. 29.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 6. Now Jacobs well was there , etc.] So called, either because it was dug by him; or because he and his family made use of it, when in those parts, as in ( John 4:12), though no mention is made of it elsewhere, unless any reference is had to it in the blessing of Joseph, to whom this place belonged, ( Genesis 49:22), as Dr. Lightfoot thinks, or in ( Deuteronomy 33:28), as Grotius suggests: in the Talmud there is mention made, of rkws y[ , the fountain of Sochar; and may not improperly be rendered, the well of Sychar: but whether the same with this, is not certain; that appears to be a great way from Jerusalem, as this also was, even forty miles: Jesus therefore being wearied with his journey ; having travelled on foot, from Judea thither; and he having a body like to ours, subject to weariness, and which proves the truth and reality of it, was greatly fatigued; having very probably travelled all that morning, if not a day, or days before: sat thus on the well ; or by it; by the side of it, upon the brink of it, as Nonnus paraphrases it, upon the bare ground. The Syriac, Arabic, and Persic versions, leave out thus; and the Ethiopic version reads it, there; but it is rightly retained, and is emphatical; and signifies, that he sat like a weary person, glad to set himself down any where; and not caring how, or where, he sat to rest his weary limbs: and it was about the sixth hour ; about twelve oclock at noon. The Ethiopic version adds by way of explanation, and it was then noon; and all the Oriental versions omit wsei , about; rendering it, it was the sixth hour: and now Christ had been travelling all the morning, and it was a time of day to take some refreshment, which as yet he had not, the disciples being gone to buy food; and a time of day also, when the sun if out, and has any strength, beats with its greatest vehemence; and all which considered, it is no wonder that he should be weary, faint, and thirsty.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 4-26 - There was great
    hatred between the Samaritans and the Jews. Christ' road from Judea to Galilee lay through Samaria. We should not go int places of temptation but when we needs must; and then must not dwell in them, but hasten through them. We have here our Lord Jesus under the common fatigue of travellers. Thus we see that he was truly a man. Toi came in with sin; therefore Christ, having made himself a curse for us submitted to it. Also, he was a poor man, and went all his journeys of foot. Being wearied, he sat thus on the well; he had no couch to res upon. He sat thus, as people wearied with travelling sit. Surely, we ought readily to submit to be like the Son of God in such things a these. Christ asked a woman for water. She was surprised because he di not show the anger of his own nation against the Samaritans. Moderat men of all sides are men wondered at. Christ took the occasion to teac her Divine things: he converted this woman, by showing her ignoranc and sinfulness, and her need of a Saviour. By this living water i meant the Spirit. Under this comparison the blessing of the Messiah ha been promised in the Old Testament. The graces of the Spirit, and his comforts, satisfy the thirsting soul, that knows its own nature an necessity. What Jesus spake figuratively, she took literally. Chris shows that the water of Jacob's well yielded a very short satisfaction Of whatever waters of comfort we drink, we shall thirst again. But whoever partakes of the Spirit of grace, and the comforts of the gospel, shall never want that which will abundantly satisfy his soul Carnal hearts look no higher than carnal ends. Give it me, saith she not that I may have everlasting life, which Christ proposed, but that come not hither to draw. The carnal mind is very ingenious in shiftin off convictions, and keeping them from fastening. But how closely ou Lord Jesus brings home the conviction to her conscience! He severel reproved her present state of life. The woman acknowledged Christ to be a prophet. The power of his word in searching the heart, and convincin the conscience of secret things, is a proof of Divine authority. I should cool our contests, to think that the things we are strivin about are passing away. The object of worship will continue still the same, God, as a Father; but an end shall be put to all difference about the place of worship. Reason teaches us to consult decency an convenience in the places of our worship; but religion gives n preference to one place above another, in respect of holiness an approval with God. The Jews were certainly in the right. Those who by the Scriptures have obtained some knowledge of God, know whom the worship. The word of salvation was of the Jews. It came to othe nations through them. Christ justly preferred the Jewish worship befor the Samaritan, yet here he speaks of the former as soon to be don away. God was about to be revealed as the Father of all believers in every nation. The spirit or the soul of man, as influenced by the Holy Spirit, must worship God, and have communion with him. Spiritual affections, as shown in fervent prayers, supplications, an thanksgivings, form the worship of an upright heart, in which God delights and is glorified. The woman was disposed to leave the matte undecided, till the coming of the Messiah. But Christ told her, I tha speak to thee, am He. She was an alien and a hostile Samaritan, merel speaking to her was thought to disgrace our Lord Jesus. Yet to thi woman did our Lord reveal himself more fully than as yet he had done to any of his disciples. No past sins can bar our acceptance with him, i we humble ourselves before him, believing in him as the Christ, the Saviour of the world.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ην
    2258 5713 V-IXI-3S δε 1161 CONJ εκει 1563 ADV πηγη 4077 N-NSF του 3588 T-GSM ιακωβ 2384 N-PRI ο 3588 T-NSM ουν 3767 CONJ ιησους 2424 N-NSM κεκοπιακως 2872 5761 V-RAP-NSM εκ 1537 PREP της 3588 T-GSF οδοιποριας 3597 N-GSF εκαθεζετο 2516 5711 V-INI-3S ουτως 3779 ADV επι 1909 PREP τη 3588 T-DSF πηγη 4077 N-DSF ωρα 5610 N-NSF ην 2258 5713 V-IXI-3S ωσει 5616 ADV εκτη 1623 A-NSF

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    6. Well (phgh). Strictly,
    spring. The word for cistern or well is frear, which John uses at vv. 11, 12. Elsewhere in the New Testament always of a pit. See Luke xiv. 5; Apoc. ix. 1, 2. There is no mention of Jacob's Well in the Old Testament. The traditional well still remains. "At the mouth of the valley of Schechem two slight breaks are visible in the midst of the vast plain of corn - one a white Mussulman chapel; the other a few fragments of stone. The first of these covers the alleged tomb of Joseph,... the second marks the undisputed site of the well, now neglected and choked up by the ruins which have fallen into it; but still with every claim to be considered the original well" (Stanley, "Sinai and Palestine"). Dr. Thomson says: "I could see nothing like a well - nothing but a low, modern wall, much broken down, and never, apparently, more than ten feet high. The area enclosed by it is fifty-six paces from east to west, and sixty-five from north to south. The surface is covered by a confused mass of shapeless rubbish, overgrown with weeds and nettles.... The well is near the southeastern corner of the area, and, to reach the mouth of it, one must let himself down, with some risk, about ten feet into a low vault" ("Land and Book"). Dr. Thosson also remarks upon the great discrepancy in the measurements of the well by different tourists, owing to the accumulations of stones and debris from the ruins of the buildings which formerly covered it. "All confirm the saying of the Samaritan woman that 'the well is deep.'" Maundrell, in 1697, makes the depth one hundred and five feet, with fifteen feet of water. Mr. Calhoun, in 1838, found nearly the same depth of water. Dr. Wilson, in 1841, found the depth only seventy-five feet, which is confirmed by the later measurements of Captain Anderson in 1866, and of Lieutenant Conder in 1875.

    Wearied (kekopiakwv). See on Luke v. 5.

    Thus. Just as He was; or, as some explain, being thus wearied.

    Sat. The imperfect tense; was sitting, when the woman came.

    Sixth Hour. According to the Jewish reckoning, mid-day. According to the Roman mode, between 5 and 6 P.M. See on i. 39. Evening was the usual time for drawing water.



    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54

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