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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Luke 16:3


    CHAPTERS: Luke 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24     
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    King James Bible - Luke 16:3

    Then the steward said within himself, What shall I do? for my lord taketh away from me the stewardship: I cannot dig; to beg I am ashamed.

    World English Bible

    "The manager said within himself, 'What will I do, seeing that my lord is taking away the
    management position from me? I don't have strength to dig. I am ashamed to beg.

    Douay-Rheims - Luke 16:3

    And the steward said within himself: What shall I do, because my lord taketh away from me the stewardship? To dig I am not able; to beg I am ashamed.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Then the steward said within himself, What shall I do? for my lord taketh from me the stewardship: I cannot dig; I am ashamed to beg.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ειπεν
    2036 5627 V-2AAI-3S δε 1161 CONJ εν 1722 PREP εαυτω 1438 F-3DSM ο 3588 T-NSM οικονομος 3623 N-NSM τι 5101 I-ASN ποιησω 4160 5661 V-AAS-1S οτι 3754 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM κυριος 2962 N-NSM μου 3450 P-1GS αφαιρειται 851 5731 V-PMI-3S την 3588 T-ASF οικονομιαν 3622 N-ASF απ 575 PREP εμου 1700 P-1GS σκαπτειν 4626 5721 V-PAN ουκ 3756 PRT-N ισχυω 2480 5719 V-PAI-1S επαιτειν 1871 5721 V-PAN αισχυνομαι 153 5727 V-PEI-1S

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (3) -
    Lu 18:4 Es 6:6

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 16:3

    Entonces el mayordomo dijo dentro de sí: ¿Qu har? Que mi seor me quita la mayordomía. Cavar, no puedo; mendigar, tengo vergenza.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Luke 16:3

    Verse 3. I cannot
    dig] He could not submit to become a common day-labourer, which was both a severe and base employment: To beg I am ashamed. And as these were the only honest ways left him to procure a morsel of bread, and he would not submit to either, he found he must continue the system of knavery, in order to provide for his idleness and luxury, or else starve. Wo to the man who gets his bread in this way! The curse of the Lord must be on his head, and on his heart; in his basket, and is his store.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 3. Then the
    steward said within himself , etc.] As the Scribes and Pharisees were wont to do, ( Matthew 3:9 9:3 Luke 7:39,49) what shall I do ? he does not say, what will become of me? I am undone, and what shall I do to be saved? or what shall I do for my Lord and Master I have so much injured? or what shall I do to make up matters with him? or what account shall I give? but what shall I do for a maintenance? how shall I live? what shall I do to please men, and gain their opinion and good will, and so be provided for by them? of this cast were the Pharisees, men pleasers, and self-seekers: for my Lord taketh away from me the stewardship : the priesthood was changed, and there was a change also of the law; the ceremonial law was abrogated, and the ordinances of the former dispensation were shaken and removed; so that these men must of course turn out of their places and offices: I cannot dig ; or plough, as the Arabic version renders it; or do any part of husbandry, particularly that which lies in manuring and cultivating the earth; not but that he was able to do it; but he could not tell how to submit to such a mean, as well as laborious way of life; for nothing was meaner among the Jews than husbandry: they have a saying, that [qrqh m htwjp twnmwa l ya , you have no trade, or business, lesser, or meaner than husbandry f463 : and to beg I am ashamed ; for nothing could be more disagreeable, to one who had lived so well in his master's house, and in so much fulness and luxury, as the Scribes and Pharisees did. The Jews have a saying, that f464 want of necessaries, wtlam bwj , is better than begging: (and says one) I have tasted the bitterness of all things, and I have not found any thing more bitter than begging: and which was literally true of the Jews, after the destruction of Jerusalem; when multitudes of them were condemned to work in the mines; and vast numbers were scattered about every where as vagabonds, begging their bread; both which were very irksome to that people: though both these phrases may be mystically understood: and digging may intend a laborious searching into the Scriptures, and a diligent performance of good works: neither of which the Pharisees much cared for, though they made large pretensions to both; nor did they dig deep to lay a good foundation whereon to build eternal life and happiness: nor could they attain to the law of righteousness by all their toil and labour, they would be thought to have taken: and for begging, they were above that: read the Pharisee's prayer in ( Luke 18:11,12) and you will not find one petition in it. To ask any thing at the throne of grace, in a way of mere grace and favour, and not merit: or to beg any thing at the hands of Christ, as life, righteousness, pardon, cleansing, healing, food, etc. they were ashamed of, and cared not for.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-12 - Whatever we have, the
    property of it is God's; we have only the use of it, according to the direction of our great Lord, and for his honour This steward wasted his lord's goods. And we are all liable to the sam charge; we have not made due improvement of what God has trusted u with. The steward cannot deny it; he must make up his accounts, and by gone. This may teach us that death will come, and deprive us of the opportunities we now have. The steward will make friends of his lord' debtors or tenants, by striking off a considerable part of their deb to his lord. The lord referred to in this parable commended not the fraud, but the policy of the steward. In that respect alone is it s noticed. Worldly men, in the choice of their object, are foolish; but in their activity, and perseverance, they are often wiser tha believers. The unjust steward is not set before us as an example i cheating his master, or to justify any dishonesty, but to point out the careful ways of worldly men. It would be well if the children of ligh would learn wisdom from the men of the world, and would as earnestl pursue their better object. The true riches signify spiritual blessings; and if a man spends upon himself, or hoards up what God ha trusted to him, as to outward things, what evidence can he have, tha he is an heir of God through Christ? The riches of this world ar deceitful and uncertain. Let us be convinced that those are truly rich and very rich, who are rich in faith, and rich toward God, rich in Christ, in the promises; let us then lay up our treasure in heaven, an expect our portion from thence.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ειπεν
    2036 5627 V-2AAI-3S δε 1161 CONJ εν 1722 PREP εαυτω 1438 F-3DSM ο 3588 T-NSM οικονομος 3623 N-NSM τι 5101 I-ASN ποιησω 4160 5661 V-AAS-1S οτι 3754 CONJ ο 3588 T-NSM κυριος 2962 N-NSM μου 3450 P-1GS αφαιρειται 851 5731 V-PMI-3S την 3588 T-ASF οικονομιαν 3622 N-ASF απ 575 PREP εμου 1700 P-1GS σκαπτειν 4626 5721 V-PAN ουκ 3756 PRT-N ισχυω 2480 5719 V-PAI-1S επαιτειν 1871 5721 V-PAN αισχυνομαι 153 5727 V-PEI-1S

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    3. The
    deep blue of the Mediterranean. The dye was permanent.

    Alexander is said by Plutarch to have found in the royal palace at Susa garments which preserved their freshness of color though they had been laid up for nearly two hundred years; and Mr. St. John ("Manner and Customs of Ancient Greece") relates that a small pot of the dye was discovered at Pompeii which had preserved the tone and richness attributed to the Tyrian purple. This fixedness of color is alluded to in Isa. i. 18 - though your sins were as scarlet, the term being rendered in the Septuagint foinikoun, which, with its kindred words, denoted darker shades of red. A full and interesting description of the purple may be found in J. A. St. John's "Manners and Customs of Ancient Greece," iii., 224 sq.

    Fine linen (busson). Byssus. A yellowish flax, and the linen made from it. Herodotus says it was used for enveloping mummies (ii. 86), a statement confirmed by microscopic examinations. He also speaks of it as a bandage for a wound (vii. 181). It is the word used by the Septuagint for linen (Exod. xxv. 4; xxviii. 5; xxxv. 6, etc.). Some of the Egyptian linen was so fine that it was called woven air. Sir Gardner Wilkinson says that some in his possession was, to the touch, comparable to silk, and not inferior in texture to the finest cambric. It was often as transparent as lawn, a fact illustrated by the painted sculptures, where the entire form is often made distinctly visible through the outer garment. Later Greek writers used the word for cotton and silk. See Wilkinson's "Ancient Egyptians," first series, iii., 114 sq., and Rawlinson's "History of Ancient Egypt," i., 487, 512. A yellow byssus was used by the Greeks, the material for which grew around Elis, and which was enormously costly. See Aeschylus, "Persae," 127.

    Fared sumptuously (eufrainomenov lamprwv). Lit., making merry in splendor. Compare ch. xv. 23, 24, 29, 32. Wyc., he ate, each day, shiningly.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    16:3 {Within himself} (en heautwi). As soon as he had time to think the thing over carefully. He knew that he was guilty of embezzlement of the Master's funds. {Taketh away} (afaireitai). Present (linear) middle indicative of afairew, old verb to take away. Here the middle present means, He is taking away for himself. {To beg I am not ashamed} (epaitein aiscunomai). The infinitive with aiscunomai means ashamed to begin to beg. The participle, epait"n aiscunomai would mean, ashamed while begging, ashamed of begging while doing it.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31

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