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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Luke 1:1


    CHAPTERS: Luke 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: BIB

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB


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    King James Bible - Luke 1:1

    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us,

    World English Bible

    Since many have undertaken to set in order a narrative concerning those matters which have been fulfilled among us,

    Douay-Rheims - Luke 1:1

    FORASMUCH as many have taken in
    hand to set forth in order a narration of the things that have been accomplished among us;

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Forasmuch as many have taken in
    hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us,

    Greek Textus Receptus


    επειδηπερ
    1895 CONJ πολλοι 4183 A-NPM επεχειρησαν 2021 5656 V-AAI-3P αναταξασθαι 392 5664 V-ADN διηγησιν 1335 N-ASF περι 4012 PREP των 3588 T-GPN πεπληροφορημενων 4135 5772 V-RPP-GPN εν 1722 PREP ημιν 2254 P-1DP πραγματων 4229 N-GPN

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (1) -
    Joh 20:31 Ac 1:1-3 1Ti 3:16 2Pe 1:16-19

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 1:1

    ¶ Habiendo muchos tratado de poner en orden la historia de las cosas que entre nosotros han sido ciertísimas,

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Luke 1:1

    Verse 1. Many have taken in
    hand] Great and remarkable characters have always many biographers. So it appears it was with our Lord: but as most of these accounts were inaccurate, recording as facts things which had not happened; and through ignorance or design mistaking others, especially in the place where St. Luke wrote; it seemed good to the Holy Spirit to inspire this holy man with the most correct knowledge of the whole history of our Lord's birth, preaching, miracles, sufferings, death, resurrection, and ascension, that the sincere, upright followers of God might have a sure foundation, on which they might safely build their faith. See the note on chap. ix. 10.

    Most surely believed among us] Facts confirmed by the fullest evidence-twn peplhroforhmenwn pragmatwn. Every thing that had been done or said by Jesus Christ was so public, so plain, and so accredited by thousands of witnesses, who could have had no interest in supporting an imposture, as to carry the fullest conviction, to the hearts of those who heard and saw him, of the divinity of his doctrine, and the truth of his miracles.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 1. Forasmuch as many have taken in hand , etc.] From hence, to the end of ( Luke 1:4) is a preface of the evangelist to his Gospel, setting forth the reasons of his writing it; and which he wrote and sent to the excellent Theophilus, for the further confirmation of him in the faith of Christ. It seems that many had took in hand, or attempted to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us ; that is, they undertook to write and publish a very particular and exact narrative of the birth, life, actions, doctrines, miracles, sufferings, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ; things which Luke, and other Christians, had the fullest and strongest evidence, and were confidently assured of, and most firmly believed, even with a full assurance of faith. By these many, he cannot mean the authentic historians of evangelical facts, as Matthew and Mark; for they two cannot, with any propriety, be called many; and besides, it is not so very clear and certain a point, that they had, as yet, wrote their Gospels; nor would this evangelist suggest any deficiency, weakness, and inaccuracy in them, as he seems to do: nor does he intend such spurious writers as the authors of the Gospels according to the Nazarenes, Hebrews, and Egyptians; of Nicodemus, Thomas, Matthias, and of the twelve apostles; and still less, the Gospels of Cerinthus, Basilides, and other heretics; since these would not have passed without a censure from him, for the falsehood, fabulous, and trifling stuff in them, as well as for the wicked and heretical opinions propagated by them; and besides, these pieces were not extant when this Gospel was written: but he seems to design some honest and well meaning Christians, who undertook to write, and did write an account of the above things, which were firmly believed by all; and which they took from the apostles, and first ministers of the Gospel, from their sermons and discourses, and from conversation with them; and which they committed to writing, partly to help their own memories, and partly for the benefit of others; in which, no doubt, they acted an upright part, though attended with weakness: wherefore, the evangelist does not censure them as false, wicked, and heretical, nor approve of them as divine and perfect for though they honestly meant, and designed well, yet there might be many things collected by them, which were impertinent, and not proper to be transmitted to posterity; and what might be wrote with great inaccuracy and deficiency, and in a style the Holy Ghost thought improper things of this kind should be delivered in: and therefore the evangelist, moved and inspired by the Spirit of God, set about the following work, and under the same influence completed it. The phrase, anataxasyai dihghsin , to set forth in order a declaration, is as Dr. Lightfoot observes, out of the Talmud f8 , agreeably to the Jewish way of speaking. R. Chasdai said to one of the Rabbins, who was atdga rdsm , setting in order a declaration before him. etc. or relating in order a story before him.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-4 - Luke will not
    write of things about which Christians may safely diffe from one another, and hesitate within themselves; but the things whic are, and ought to be surely believed. The doctrine of Christ is what the wisest and best of men have ventured their souls upon with confidence and satisfaction. And the great events whereon our hope depend, have been recorded by those who were from the beginnin eye-witnesses and ministers of the word, and who were perfected in their understanding of them through Divine inspiration.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    επειδηπερ
    1895 CONJ πολλοι 4183 A-NPM επεχειρησαν 2021 5656 V-AAI-3P αναταξασθαι 392 5664 V-ADN διηγησιν 1335 N-ASF περι 4012 PREP των 3588 T-GPN πεπληροφορημενων 4135 5772 V-RPP-GPN εν 1722 PREP ημιν 2254 P-1DP πραγματων 4229 N-GPN

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    1. Forasmuch as (epeidhper). Only ere in New Testament. A
    compound conjuction: ejpei , since, dh, as is well known, and per, giving the sense of certainty.

    Have taken in hand (epeceirhsan). Used by Luke only. A literal translation. The word carries the sense of a difficult undertaking (see Acts xix. 13), and implies that previous attempts have not been successful. It occurs frequently in medical language. Hippocrates begins one of his medical treatises very much as Luke begins his gospel. "As many as have taken in hand (epeceirhsan) to speak or to write concerning the healing art."

    To set forth in order (anataxasqai). Only here in New Testament. The A.V. is true to the core of the word, which is tassw, to put in order, or arrange. Rev. happily gives the force of the preposition ajna, up, by the rendering draw up.

    A declaration (dihghsin). Only here in New Testament. From dia, through, and hJgeomai, to lead the way. Hence something which leads the reader through the mass of facts: a narrative, as A.V., with the accompanying idea of thoroughness. Note the singular number. Many took in hand to draw up, not narratives, but a narrative, embracing the whole of the evangelic matter. The word was particularly applied to a medical treatise. Galen applies it at least seventy three times to the writings of Hippocrates.

    Which are most surely believed (twn peplhroforhmenwn). From plhrhv, full, and forew, the frequentative form of ferw, to bring, meaning to bring frequently or habitually. Hence, to bring full measure; to fulfil. Compare 2 Tim. iv. 5, 17. Also of full assurance. Applied to persons. Rom. iv. 21; Heb. v. 22. As applied to things, therefore, the sense of the A.V. is inadmissible. Render as Rev., have been fulfilled. The word is chosen to indicate that these events happened in accordance with a preconceived design. Wyc., been filled in us.

    Among us. Explained by the words in the next sentence, who were eye witnesses and ministers.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    1:1 {Forasmuch as} (epeideper). Here alone in the N.T., though common in literary Attic. Appears in the papyri. A triple compound (epei = since, de = admittedly true, per = intensive particle to emphasize importance). {Many} (polloi). How many no one knows, but certainly more than two or three. We know that Luke used the logia of Jesus written by Matthew in Aramaic (Papias) and Mark's Gospel. Undoubtedly he had other written sources. {Have taken in hand} (epeceiresan). A literal translation of epiceirew (from ceir, hand and epi, upon). Both Hippocrates and Galen use this word in their introduction to their medical works. Here only in the N.T., though a common literary word. Common in the papyri for undertaking with no idea of failure or blame. Luke does not mean to cast reflection on those who preceded him. The apocryphal gospels were all much later and are not in his mind. Luke had secured fuller information and planned a book on a larger scale and did surpass them with the result that they all perished save Mark's Gospel and what Matthew and Luke possess of the logia of Jesus. There was still room for Luke's book. That motive influences every author and thus progress is made. {To draw up, a narrative} (anataxasqai diegesin). Ingressive aorist middle infinitive. this verb anataxasqai has been found only in Plutarch's _Moral_. 968 CD about an elephant "rehearsing" by moonlight certain tricks it had been taught (Moulton and Milligan, _Vocabulary_). That was from memory going regularly through the thing again. But the idea in the word is plain enough. The word is composed of tassw, a common verb for arranging things in proper order and ana, again. Luke means to say that those before him had made attempts to rehearse in orderly fashion various matters about Christ. "The expression points to a connected series of narratives in some order (taxis), topical or chronological rather than to isolated narratives" (Bruce). "They had produced something more than mere notes or anecdotes" (Plummer). diegesis means leading or carrying a thing through, not a mere incident. Galen applies this word some seventy-five times to the writing of Hippocrates. {Which have been fulfilled} (twn peplerwforemenwn). Perfect passive participle from pleroforew and that from pleres (full) and ferw (to bring). Hence to bring or make full. The verb is rare outside of the LXX and the N.T. Papyri examples occur for finishing off a legal matter or a financial matter in full. Deissmann (_Light from the Ancient East_, pp. 86f.) gives examples from the papyri and inscriptions for completing a task or being convinced or satisfied in mind. The same ambiguity occurs here. When used of persons in the N.T. the meaning is to be convinced, or fully persuaded (#Ro 4:21; 14:5; Heb 6:11; 10:22). When used of things it has the notion of completing or finishing (#2Ti 4:5,17). Luke is here speaking of "matters" (pragmatwn). Luke may refer to the matters connected with Christ's life which have been brought to a close among us or accomplished. Bruce argues plausibly that he means fulness of knowledge "concerning the things which have become widely known among us Christians." In #Col 2:2 we have "fulness of understanding" (tes pleroforias tes sunesews). In modern Greek the verb means to inform. The careful language of Luke here really pays a tribute to those who had preceded him in their narratives concerning Christ.


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

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