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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Mark 6:9


    CHAPTERS: Mark 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16     
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: BIB

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - РУССКАЯ БИБЛИЯ

    King James Bible - Mark 6:9

    But be shod with sandals; and not put on two coats.

    World English Bible

    but to wear
    sandals, and not put on two tunics.

    Douay-Rheims - Mark 6:9

    But to be shod with
    sandals, and that they should not put on two coats.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    But be shod with
    sandals; and not put on two coats.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    αλλ
    235 CONJ υποδεδεμενους 5265 5772 V-RPP-APM σανδαλια 4547 N-APN και 2532 CONJ μη 3361 PRT-N {VAR1: ενδυσησθε 1746 5672 V-AMS-2P } {VAR2: ενδυσασθαι 1746 5670 V-AMN } δυο 1417 A-NUI χιτωνας 5509 N-APM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (9) -
    Eph 6:15

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 6:9

    mas que calzasen sandalias, y no vistiesen dos tnicas.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Mark 6:9

    Verse 9. Shod with
    sandals] The sandal seems to have been similar to the Roman solea, which covered only the sole of the foot, and was fastened about the foot and ankle with straps. The sandal was originally a part of the woman's dress; ancient authors represent them as worn only by women. In Matt. x. 10, the disciples are commanded to take no shoes, upodhmata, which word is nearly of the same import with sandalia, sandals; but, as our Lord intimates to them that they should be free from all useless incumbrances, that they might fulfill his orders with the utmost diligence and despatch, so we may suppose that the sandal was a lighter kind of wear than the shoe: and indeed the word sandal, which is mere Chaldee, ldno might be properly translated a light shoe; as it is compounded of yo sin, a shoe, (see Targum, Deut. xxv. 9, 10,) and ld dal, thin, slender, or mean, as being made, not only lighter than the hypodema or shoe, but (probably) also of meaner materials. See many excellent observations on this subject in Martinius's Etymolog. Lexicon, under the word Sandalium.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 9. But be shod with
    sandals , etc..] Which were different from shoes, and more fit to travel with, and therefore allowed when shoes were forbidden; (see Gill on Matthew 10:10), though some think there was no difference between shoes and sandals, and that Christ, in ( Matthew 10:10), does not forbid the taking of shoes, but two pair of shoes; as not two coats, nor two staves, but one of a sort only. And not put on two coats ; that is, at a time; an inner and an outward one, or one at one time, and another at another: they were forbid change of raiment; the reasons for it (see Gill on Matthew 10:10). From all which it appears, that as a minister of the Gospel ought not to be a worldly minded man, that minds earth and earthly things, and seeks to amass wealth and riches to himself, and preaches for filthy lucre's sake; nor to be a sensual and voluptuous man, serving his own belly, and not the Lord Jesus Christ, feeding himself, and not the flock; so neither should he be filled with worldly cares, overwhelmed in worldly business, and entangled with the affairs of this life: he ought to have his mind free from all solicitude and anxious concern, about a subsistence for himself and his, that so he may with greater and more close application attend to his ministry, to preparations for it, and the performance of it; and give up himself entirely to the word and prayer, and not have his mind distracted with other things: upon which account it is highly necessary, that the people to whom he ministers should take care, that a sufficient provision be made for him; that he may live without any anxious care and thought about such things, and his mind be more intent about the work he is called unto: and which is what our Lord chiefly designs by all this, who has ordained that they that preach the Gospel, should be comfortably provided for, and live of it; and which, as it makes for the peace of their minds that minister, it issues in the advantage of those who are ministered to.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 7-13 - Though the
    apostles were conscious to themselves of great weakness, an expected no wordly advantage, yet, in obedience to their Master, and i dependence upon his strength, they went out. They did not amuse people with curious matters, but told them they must repent of their sins, an turn to God. The servants of Christ may hope to turn many from darknes unto God, and to heal souls by the power of the Holy Ghost.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    αλλ
    235 CONJ υποδεδεμενους 5265 5772 V-RPP-APM σανδαλια 4547 N-APN και 2532 CONJ μη 3361 PRT-N {VAR1: ενδυσησθε 1746 5672 V-AMS-2P } {VAR2: ενδυσασθαι 1746 5670 V-AMN } δυο 1417 A-NUI χιτωνας 5509 N-APM

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    6:9 {Shod with
    sandals} (hupodedemenous sandalia). Perfect passive participle in the accusative case as if with the infinitive poreuesqai or poreuthnai, (to go). Note the aorist infinitive middle, endusasqai (text of Westcott and Hort), but endusesqe (aorist middle subjunctive) in the margin. Change from indirect to direct discourse common enough, not necessarily due to "disjointed notes on which the Evangelist depended" (Swete). #Mt 10:10 has "nor shoes" (mede hupodemata), possibly preserving the distinction between "shoes" and "sandals" (worn by women in Greece and by men in the east, especially in travelling). But here again extra shoes may be the prohibition. See on Mt 10:10 for this . {Two coats} (duo citwnas). Two was a sign of comparative wealth (Swete). The mention of "two" here in all three Gospels probably helps us to understand that the same thing applies to shoes and staff. "In general, these directions are against luxury in equipment, and also against their providing themselves with what they could procure from the hospitality of others" (Gould).


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56

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