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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Matthew 8:2


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    King James Bible - Matthew 8:2

    And, behold, there came a leper and worshipped him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean.

    World English Bible

    Behold, a leper came to him and worshiped him, saying, "Lord, if you want to, you can make me clean."

    Douay-Rheims - Matthew 8:2

    And behold a leper came and adored him, saying: Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And behold, there came a leper and worshiped him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ ιδου 2400 5628 V-2AAM-2S λεπρος 3015 A-NSM ελθων 2064 5631 V-2AAP-NSM προσεκυνει 4352 5707 V-IAI-3S αυτω 846 P-DSM λεγων 3004 5723 V-PAP-NSM κυριε 2962 N-VSM εαν 1437 COND θελης 2309 5725 V-PAS-2S δυνασαι 1410 5736 V-PNI-2S με 3165 P-1AS καθαρισαι 2511 5658 V-AAN

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (2) -
    Mr 1:40 *etc:

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 8:2

    Y he aquí un leproso vino, y le adoraba, diciendo: Seor, si quisieres, puedes limpiarme.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Matthew 8:2

    Verse 2. And, behold, there came a
    leper] The leprosy lepra, from lepiv, a scale, was an inveterate cutaneous disease, appearing in dry, thin, white scurfy scales or scabs, either on the whole body, or on some part of it, usually attended with violent itching, and often with great pain. The eastern leprosy was a distemper of the most loathsome kind, highly contagious, so as to infect garments, (Lev. xiii. 47, &c.,) and houses, (Lev. xiv. 34, &c.,) and was deemed incurable by any human means.

    Among the Jews, GOD alone was applied to for its removal; and the cure was ever attributed to his sovereign power.

    The various symptoms of this dreadful disorder, which was a striking emblem of sin, may be seen in Lev. xiii. xiv. , where also may be read the legal ordinances concerning it; which, as on the one hand, they set forth how odious sin is to God, so, on the other, they represent the cleansing of our pollutions by the sacrifice and resurrection of Christ, by the sprinkling and application of his blood, and by the sanctifying and healing influences of the Holy Spirit.

    The Greek name lepra, seems to have been given to this distemper, on account of the thin, white SCALES (lepidev) with which the bodies of the leprous were sometimes so covered as to give them the appearance of snow, Exod. iv. 6; Num. xii. 10; 2 Kings v. 27.

    Herodotus, lib. 1, mentions this disorder as existing, in his time, among the Persians. He calls it leukhn, the white scab; and says, that those who were affected with it were prohibited from mingling with the other citizens; and so dreadful was this malady esteemed among them that they considered it a punishment on the person, from their great god, the sun, for some evil committed against him. Dr. Mead mentions a remarkable case of this kind which came under his own observation. "A countryman whose whole body was so miserably seized with it that his skin was shining as covered with flakes of snow, and as the furfuraceous or bran-like scales were daily rubbed off, the flesh appeared quick or raw underneath." See the doctor's Medica Sacra, chap. 2. It was probably on account of its tendency to produce this disorder, in that warm climate, that God forbade the use of swine's flesh to the Jews. Feeding on this crude aliment, in union with the intemperate use of ardent spirits, is, in all likelihood, the grand cause of the scurvy, which is so common in the British nations, and which would probably assume the form and virulence of a leprosy, were our climate as hot as that of Judea. See the notes on "Exod. iv. 6", and on Leviticus 13: and 14.

    Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean.] As this leper may be considered as a fit emblem of the corruption of man by sin; so may his cure, of the redemption of the soul by Christ. A sinner, truly penitent, seeks God with a respectful faith; approaches him in the spirit of adoration; humbles himself under his mighty hand, acknowledging the greatness of his fall, and the vileness of his sin; his prayer, like that of the leper, should be humble, plain, and full of confidence in that God who can do all things, and of dependence upon his will or mercy, from which all good must be derived. It is peculiar to God that he need only will what he intends to perform. His power is his will. The ability of God to do what is necessary to be done, and his willingness to make his creatures happy, should be deeply considered by all those who approach him in prayer. The leper had no doubt of the former, but he was far from being equally satisfied in respect of the latter.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 2. And behold there came a leper , etc.] As soon as he came down from the mountain, and whilst he was in the way; though Luke says, ( Luke 5:12) when he was in a certain city; in one of the cities of Galilee; one of their large towns, or unwalled cities, into which a leper might come: he might not come into walled towns, at least they might turn him out, though without punishment: for the canon runs thus f489 , a leper that enters into Jerusalem is to be beaten; but if he enters into any of the other walled towns, though he has no right, as it is said, he sitteth alone, he is not to be beaten.

    Besides, this leper, as Luke says, was full of leprosy, ( Luke 5:12) see the note there; and he might be pronounced clean by the priest, though not healed, and so might go into any city or synagogue: the law concerning such an one, in ( Leviticus 13:1-13:59) is a very surprising one; that if only there were some risings and appearances of the leprosy here and there, the man was unclean; but if the leprosy covered all his flesh, then he was pronounced clean; and such was this man: he was a very lively emblem of a poor vile sinner, full of sin and iniquity, who is brought to see himself all over covered with sin, when he comes to Christ for pardon and cleansing; and is so considered by Christ the high priest, when he applies his justifying righteousness and sin purging blood to his conscience. A leper, by the Jews f490 , is called [r , a wicked man; for they suppose leprosy comes upon him for evil speaking. This account is ushered in with a behold, as a note of admiration and attention, expressing the wonderfulness of the miracle wrought, and the seasonableness of it to confirm the doctrines Christ had been preaching to the multitude. This man came of his own accord, having heard of the fame of Christ; and worshipped him in a civil and respectful way, showing great reverence to him as a man; which he did by falling down on his knees, and on his face; prostrating himself before him, in a very humble and submissive manner, as the other evangelists relate: for that he worshipped him as God, is not so manifest; though it is certain he had an high opinion of him, and great faith in him; which he very modestly expresses, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean : he was fully assured of his power, that he could make him clean, entirely rid him of his leprosy, which the priest could not do; who could only, according to the law, pronounce him clean, so that he might be admitted to company, but could not heal him of his disease: this the poor man was persuaded Christ could do for him, and humbly submits it to his will; of which, as yet, he had no intimation from him. And thus it is with poor sensible sinners under first awakenings; they can believe in the ability of Christ to justify them by his righteousness, cleanse them by his blood; and save them by his grace to the uttermost: but they stick at, and hesitate about his willingness, by reason of their own vileness and unworthiness.


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 2-4 - In these verses we have an account of Christ's cleansing a leper, wh came and worshipped him, as one clothed with Divine power. Thi cleansing directs us, not only to apply to Christ, who has power ove bodily diseases, for the cure of them, but it also teaches us in what manner to apply to him. When we cannot be sure of God's will, we may be sure of his wisdom and mercy. No guilt is so great, but there is tha in Christ's blood which atones for it; no corruption so strong, but there is that in his grace which can subdue it. To be made clean we must commend ourselves to his pity; we cannot demand it as a debt, but we must humbly request it as a favour. Those who by faith apply to Christ for mercy and grace, may be sure that he is freely willing to give them the mercy and grace they thus seek. And those afflictions ar blessed that bring us to know Christ, and cause us to seek help an salvation from him. Let those who are cleansed from their spiritual leprosy, go to Christ's ministers and open their case, that they ma advise, comfort, and pray for them.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ ιδου 2400 5628 V-2AAM-2S λεπρος 3015 A-NSM ελθων 2064 5631 V-2AAP-NSM προσεκυνει 4352 5707 V-IAI-3S αυτω 846 P-DSM λεγων 3004 5723 V-PAP-NSM κυριε 2962 N-VSM εαν 1437 COND θελης 2309 5725 V-PAS-2S δυνασαι 1410 5736 V-PNI-2S με 3165 P-1AS καθαρισαι 2511 5658 V-AAN

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    8:2 {If thou wilt} (ean qeleis). The
    leper knew that Jesus had the power to heal him. His doubt was about his willingness. "Men more easily believe in miraculous power than in miraculous love" (Bruce). this is a condition of the third class (undetermined, but with prospect of being determined), a hopeful doubt at any rate. Jesus accepted his challenge by "I will." The command to "tell no one" was to suppress excitement and prevent hostility.


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