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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Matthew 8:7


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    King James Bible - Matthew 8:7

    And Jesus saith unto him, I will come and heal him.

    World English Bible

    Jesus said to him, "I will come and heal him."

    Douay-Rheims - Matthew 8:7

    And Jesus saith to him: I will come and heal him.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And Jesus saith to him, I will come and heal him.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ λεγει 3004 5719 V-PAI-3S αυτω 846 P-DSM ο 3588 T-NSM ιησους 2424 N-NSM εγω 1473 P-1NS ελθων 2064 5631 V-2AAP-NSM θεραπευσω 2323 5692 V-FAI-1S αυτον 846 P-ASM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (7) -
    Mt 9:18,19 Mr 5:23,24 Lu 7:6

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 8:7

    Y Jess le dijo: Yo ir y le sanar.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Matthew 8:7

    Verse 7. I will come and
    heal him.] egw eloqwn qerapeusw auton, I am coming, and will heal him. This saying is worthy of observation. Jesus did not positively say, I will came and heal him; this could not have been strictly true, because our Lord healed him without going to the house: and the issue shows that the words ought to be taken in the most literal sense: thus understood, they contained a promise which it seems none of them distinctly comprehended. Foreseeing the exercise of the centurion's faith, he promises that while he is coming, ere he arrives at the house, he will heal him, and this was literally done, ver. 13. There is much beauty in this passage.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 7. And
    Jesus saith unto him, I will come and heal him .] This answer of Christs, which is short and full, not only shows the readiness of Christ to do good, how soon and easily he complied with the centurions request, it being a prayer of faith, and so effectual, and was heard as soon as delivered; but also contains an absolute promise that he would heal him. He does not say that he would come and see him, and what his case was, and do what he could for him, as ordinary physicians do; but he would come and heal him at once: and indeed it is a proposal of more than what was asked of him; his presence was not asked, and yet he offered it; though Luke says, that he besought him by the messengers to come and heal his servant; and so this is an answer to both parts of the request; the whole is granted. Christ cannot deny anything to faith, his presence or assistance.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 5-13 - This
    centurion was a heathen, a Roman soldier. Though he was a soldier yet he was a godly man. No man's calling or place will be an excuse for unbelief and sin. See how he states his servant's case. We shoul concern ourselves for the souls of our children and servants, who ar spiritually sick, who feel not spiritual evils, who know not that whic is spiritually good; and we should bring them to Christ by faith an prayers. Observe his self-abasement. Humble souls are made more humbl by Christ's gracious dealings with them. Observe his great faith. The more diffident we are of ourselves, the stronger will be our confidenc in Christ. Herein the centurion owns him to have Divine power, and full command of all the creatures and powers of nature, as a maste over his servants. Such servants we all should be to God; we must go and come, according to the directions of his word and the disposals of his providence. But when the Son of man comes he finds little faith therefore he finds little fruit. An outward profession may cause us to be called children of the kingdom; but if we rest in that, and have nothing else to show, we shall be cast out. The servant got a cure of his disease, and the master got the approval of his faith. What wa said to him, is said to all, Believe, and ye shall receive; onl believe. See the power of Christ, and the power of faith. The healin of our souls is at once the effect and evidence of our interest in the blood of Christ.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    και
    2532 CONJ λεγει 3004 5719 V-PAI-3S αυτω 846 P-DSM ο 3588 T-NSM ιησους 2424 N-NSM εγω 1473 P-1NS ελθων 2064 5631 V-2AAP-NSM θεραπευσω 2323 5692 V-FAI-1S αυτον 846 P-ASM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    7.
    Heal (qerapeusw). So A.V. and Rev. The word, however, originally means to attend, and to treat medically. The centurion uses another and stronger word, shall be healed (iaqhsetai). Luke, who as a physician is precise in the use of medical terms, uses both words in one verse (ix. 11). Jesus healed (iato) all who had need of treatment (qerapeiav). Still, Luke himself does not always observe the distinction. See on Luke v. 15.

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    8:7 {I will come and
    heal him} (egw elqwn qerapeusw auton). Future indicative, not deliberative subjunctive in question (McNeile). The word here for heal (therapeus") means first to serve, give medical attention, qen cure, restore to health. The centurion uses the more definite word for healing (iathsetai #8:8) as Matthew does in #8:13 (iath). Luke (#Lu 9:11), like a physician, says that Jesus healed (iato) those in need of treatment (qerapeias), but the distinction is not always observed. In #Ac 28:8 Luke uses iasato of the miraculous healings in Malta by Paul while he employs etherapeuonto (#Ac 28:9) apparently of the practice of Luke the physician (so W. M. Ramsay). Matthew represents the centurion himself as speaking to Jesus while Luke has it that two committees from the centurion brought the messages, apparently a more detailed narrative. What one does through others he does himself as Pilate "scourged Jesus" (had him scourged).


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