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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Matthew 20:2


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    King James Bible - Matthew 20:2

    And when he had agreed with the labourers for a penny a day, he sent them into his vineyard.

    World English Bible

    When he had agreed with the laborers for a denarius a
    day, he sent them into his vineyard.

    Douay-Rheims - Matthew 20:2

    And having agreed with the labourers for a penny a
    day, he sent them into his vineyard.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And when he had agreed with the laborers for a penny a
    day, he sent them into his vineyard.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    συμφωνησας
    4856 5660 V-AAP-NSM δε 1161 CONJ μετα 3326 PREP των 3588 T-GPM εργατων 2040 N-GPM εκ 1537 PREP δηναριου 1220 N-GSN την 3588 T-ASF ημεραν 2250 N-ASF απεστειλεν 649 5656 V-AAI-3S αυτους 846 P-APM εις 1519 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM αμπελωνα 290 N-ASM αυτου 846 P-GSM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (2) -
    :13 Ex 19:5,6 De 5:27-30

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 20:2

    Y habindose concertado con los obreros en un denario al día, los envi a su via.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Matthew 20:2

    Verse 2. A
    penny] A Roman coin, as noted before, Matthew xviii. 28, worth about seven-pence halfpenny or seven-pence three farthings of our money, and equal to the Greek drachma. This appears to have been the ordinary price of a day's labour at that time. See Tobit v. 14. In 1351 the price of labour was regulated in this country by parliament; and it is remarkable that "corn-weeders and hay-makers, without meat, drink, or other courtesy demanded," were to have one penny per day! In 1314 the pay of a chaplain to the Scotch bishops, who were then prisoners in England, was three halfpence per day. See Fleetwood's Chronicon Precios, p. 123, 129. This was miserable wages, though things at that time were so cheap that twenty-four eggs were sold for a penny, p. 72; a pair of shoes for four-pence, p. 71; a fat goose for two-pence halfpenny, p. 72; a hen for a penny, p. 72; eight bushels of wheat for two shillings, and a fat ox for six shillings and eight-pence! Ibid. In 1336, wheat per quarter, 2s.; a fat sheep 6d.; fat goose, 2d. and a pig, 1d.,p. 75.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 2. And when he had agreed with the labourers for a
    penny a day, etc.] These labourers were of that sort that were called wy ryk , hired for a day; concerning whom is the following rule f1051 : he that is hired for a day, may demand it all the night; and he that is hired for a night may demand it all the day: he that is hired for hours, may demand it all the night, and all the day; he that is hired for a week, he that is hired for a month, he that is hired for a year, he that is hired for seven, if he goes out in the day, may demand all the day; and if he goes out in the night, he may demand it all the night, and all the day.

    And the wages of a day were usually rnyd a penny; which, if understood of a Roman penny, was seven pence halfpenny of our money. One of their canons runs thus f1052 : he that hires a labourer in the winter, to work with him in the summer, wy lkb , for a penny every day, and he gives him his hire; and, lo! his hire is alike to that in the winter, a sela every day, this is forbidden; because it looks as if he chose that time to lessen his wages; but if he says to him, work with me from this day, to such a time, for a penny every day, though his hire is the same, a sela every day, this is lawful.

    By the penny a day agreed for with the labourers, may be meant external privileges; or the free promise made, whether to ministers, or private believers, of a sufficient supply of grace daily, that as their day is, their strength shall be; together with that of eternal life and happiness at last. He sent them into his vineyard; to labour there: for none have any business there, but such who are called and sent by the owner of it; and where sons are sent, and work, as well as servants; (see Matthew 21:28,29).


    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 1-16 - The direct object of this parable seems to be, to show that though the Jews were first called into the vineyard, at length the gospel shoul be preached to the Gentiles, and they should be admitted to equa privileges and advantages with the Jews. The parable may also be applied more generally, and shows, 1. That God is debtor to no man. 2 That many who begin last, and promise little in religion, sometimes, by the blessing of God, arrive at a great deal of knowledge, grace, an usefulness. 3. That the recompense of reward will be given to the saints, but not according to the time of their conversion. It describe the state of the visible church, and explains the declaration that the last shall be first, and the first last, in its various references Till we are hired into the service of God, we are standing all the da idle: a sinful state, though a state of drudgery to Satan, may be called a state of idleness. The market-place is the world, and from that we are called by the gospel. Come, come from this market-place Work for God will not admit of trifling. A man may go idle to hell, but he that will go to heaven, must be diligent. The Roman penny wa sevenpence halfpenny in our money, wages then enough for the day' support. This does not prove that the reward of our obedience to God is of works, or of debt; when we have done all, we are unprofitabl servants; but it signifies that there is a reward set before us, ye let none, upon this presumption, put off repentance till they are old Some were sent into the vineyard at the eleventh hour; but nobody ha hired them before. The Gentiles came in at the eleventh hour; the gospel had not been before preached to them. Those that have had gospe offers made them at the third or sixth hour, and have refused them will not have to say at the eleventh hour, as these had, No man ha hired us. Therefore, not to discourage any, but to awaken all, be it remembered, that now is the accepted time. The riches of Divine grac are loudly murmured at, among proud Pharisees and nominal Christians There is great proneness in us to think that we have too little, an others too much of the tokens of God's favour; and that we do too much and others too little in the work of God. But if God gives grace to others, it is kindness to them, and no injustice to us. Carna worldlings agree with God for their penny in this world; and choos their portion in this life. Obedient believers agree with God for their penny in the other world, and must remember they have so agreed. Dids not thou agree to take up with heaven as thy portion, thy all; wil thou seek for happiness in the creature? God punishes none more tha they deserve, and recompenses every service done for him; he therefor does no wrong to any, by showing extraordinary grace to some. See her the nature of envy. It is an evil eye, which is displeased at the goo of others, and desires their hurt. It is a grief to ourselves displeasing to God, and hurtful to our neighbours: it is a sin that ha neither pleasure, profit, nor honour. Let us forego every proud claim and seek for salvation as a free gift. Let us never envy or grudge, but rejoice and praise God for his mercy to others as well as to ourselves.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    συμφωνησας
    4856 5660 V-AAP-NSM δε 1161 CONJ μετα 3326 PREP των 3588 T-GPM εργατων 2040 N-GPM εκ 1537 PREP δηναριου 1220 N-GSN την 3588 T-ASF ημεραν 2250 N-ASF απεστειλεν 649 5656 V-AAI-3S αυτους 846 P-APM εις 1519 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM αμπελωνα 290 N-ASM αυτου 846 P-GSM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    2. For a
    penny (ek dhnariou). A denarius, the chief silver coin of the Romans at this time, and of the value of about seventeen cents. We must remember to reckon according to the rate of wages in that day. A denarius was regarded as good pay for a day's work. It was the pay of a Roman soldier in Christ's time. In almost every case where the word occurs in the New Testament it is connected with the idea of a liberal or large amount. Compare Matt. xviii. 28; Mark vi. 37; Luke vii. 41; John xii. 5.

    For a penny is, literally, out of or on the strength of a penny; the payment being that on the strength of which the agreement was made. The agreement arose out of the demand on the one hand and the promise on the other.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    20:2 {For a penny a day} (ek denariou ten hemeran). See on 18:28. "Penny" is not adequate, "shilling" Moffatt has it. The ek with the ablative represents the agreement (sunph"nsas) with the workmen (ergatwn). "The day" the Greek has it, an accusative of extent of time.


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