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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 20:20


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: BIB - COMM

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    King James Bible - Acts 20:20

    And how I kept back nothing that was profitable unto you, but have shewed you, and have taught you publickly, and from house to house,

    World English Bible

    how I didn't shrink from declaring to you anything that was profitable,
    teaching you publicly and from house to house,

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 20:20

    How I have kept back nothing that was profitable to you, but have preached it to you, and taught you publicly, and from house to house,

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And how I kept back nothing that was profitable to you, but have shown you, and have taught you publicly, and from house to house,

    Greek Textus Receptus


    ως
    5613 ADV ουδεν 3762 A-ASN υπεστειλαμην 5288 5668 V-AMI-1S των 3588 T-GPN συμφεροντων 4851 5723 V-PAP-GPN του 3588 T-GSM μη 3361 PRT-N αναγγειλαι 312 5658 V-AAN υμιν 5213 P-2DP και 2532 CONJ διδαξαι 1321 5658 V-AAN υμας 5209 P-2AP δημοσια 1219 A-DSF 1219 ADV και 2532 CONJ κατ 2596 PREP οικους 3624 N-APM

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (20) -
    :27,31; 5:2 De 4:5 Ps 40:9,10 Eze 33:7-9 1Co 15:3 Col 1:28

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 20:20

    como nada que fuese til he rehuido de anunciaros y ensearos, pblicamente y por las casas,

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 20:20

    Verse 20. I kept back nothing] Notwithstanding the
    dangers to which he was exposed, and the temptations he must have had to suppress those truths that were less acceptable to the unrenewed nature of man, or to the particular prejudices of the Jews and the Gentiles, he fully and faithfully, at all hazards, declared what he terms, ver. 27, the whole counsel of God. "Behold here," says the judicious and pious Calmet, "the model of a good shepherd-full of doctrine and zeal: he communicates with profusion, and yet with discretion, without jealousy and without fear, what God had put in his heart, and what charity inspires. A good shepherd, says St. Bernard, should always have abundance of bread in his scrip, and his dog under command. His dog is his zeal, which he must lead, order, and moderate; his scrip full of bread is his mind full of useful knowledge; and he should ever be in readiness to give nourishment to his flock." He who will quarrel with this sentiment, because of the uncouthness of the simile, needs pity, and deserves censure.

    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 20. And how I kept back nothing that was profitable unto you , etc.] The Syriac version supplies, to your souls; to lead them into a true
    knowledge of the doctrines of the Gospel, and to confirm them in the same, and to preserve them from errors in principle, and immoralities in practice, and to encourage the exercise of every grace, and to instruct them in every branch of duty; nothing of this kind, or which had this tendency, did the apostle dissemble, conceal, or drop, either through sloth and indolence, or through fear of men, or for the sake of reputation, wealth, and friends. The things the apostle may have chiefly in view are the truths of the Gospel, which are very profitable to the souls of men; such as relate to the knowledge of God, his being, perfections, and persons; as that there are three persons in the Godhead, Father, Son, and Spirit, which is profitable to be known, in order to understand the economy of salvation, in which each person has his distinct concern; and that both the Son and Spirit are equally God with the Father, which accounts for the virtue and efficacy of the blood, righteousness, and sacrifice of Christ, and how safely he may be depended upon for salvation, and how equal the Holy Spirit is to his work and office; likewise such doctrines as relate to the sin of Adam and his posterity in him, to the imputation of the guilt of that sin unto them, and the derivation of a corrupt nature from him, and which respect the impurity and impotence of human nature; all which is profitable, since it accounts for the origin of moral evil, and many of the dispensations of providence in involving those that do not know the right hand from their left in public calamities; and since it shows the necessity of regenerating grace, tends to the humiliation of men, and makes for the magnifying the riches of Gods grace: also such doctrines as express the grace of God in mans salvation as the doctrines of Gods everlasting love, of election, redemption, justification, pardon, reconciliation, union to Christ, and final perseverance; all which are exceeding profitable, for the peace, comfort, and refreshment of the souls of Gods people. Moreover, the ordinances of the Gospel, baptism, and the Lords supper, which are the privileges of believers, and the means of their spiritual profit, may be included, together with all the duties of religion; which though not profitable by way of merit, yet contribute to the peace and pleasure of the mind; and none of these things did the apostle withhold from the elders and church at Ephesus, as his epistle to that church does abundantly show, in which, doctrines, ordinances, and duties are taken notice of: now to keep back these, is either to keep them back wholly, to say nothing of any of them, but in the room of them to deliver out morality and legal righteousness; or in part, to mix the truths of the Gospel with the doctrines of men, and not give out the sincere milk of the word; or to draw and fetch back what has been delivered through the fear of men, and in order to gain reputation and applause: but so did not the apostle, nor should any minister of the Gospel; and that for the reason in the words, because they are profitable; as also because they are the counsel of God; and because it is the will of Christ that nothing should be hid, but everything should be published, which he has signified to his servants; and this is enforced by his own example, who whatever he heard of his Father, he made known to his disciples; and for the ministers of Christ to do otherwise, would argue unfaithfulness in them both to Christ and to the souls of men: but have showed you ; all the doctrines of the Gospel, and pointed to every path of duty, and declared, as he says hereafter, the whole counsel of God: and have taught you publicly ; first in the Jewish synagogue, then in the school of Tyrannus, ( Acts 19:8-10) and in whatsoever place the church, when formed, might meet together for public worship; there the apostle taught them the truths of the Gospel openly, and without any reserve, before all the people, as Christ ordered his apostles to do, and as he himself did, ( Matthew 10:27, John 18:20) and from house to house : as he visited the saints at their own houses, to know their personal cases, and the state of their souls, he instructed them privately and personally one by one; he taught the same publicly as privately, and privately as publicly: and took every opportunity of instilling Gospel truths into them, and of enriching them with a larger knowledge of them; which shows his affection and zeal, his laboriousness, industry, and indefatigableness in the ministry.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 17-27 - The
    elders knew that Paul was no designing, self-seeking man. Those wh would in any office serve the Lord acceptably, and profitably to others, must do it with humility. He was a plain preacher, one tha spoke his message so as to be understood. He was a powerful preacher he preached the gospel as a testimony to them if they received it; but as a testimony against them if they rejected it. He was a profitabl preacher; one that aimed to inform their judgments, and reform their hearts and lives. He was a painful preacher, very industrious in his work. He was a faithful preacher; he did not keep back reproofs when necessary, nor keep back the preaching of the cross. He was a trul Christian, evangelical preacher; he did not preach notions or doubtfu matters; nor affairs of state or the civil government; but he preache faith and repentance. A better summary of these things, without whic there is no salvation, cannot be given: even repentance towards God and faith towards our Lord Jesus Christ, with their fruits and effects Without these no sinner can escape, and with these none will come shor of eternal life. Let them not think that Paul left Asia for fear of persecution; he was in full expectation of trouble, yet resolved to go on, well assured that it was by Divine direction. Thanks be to God tha we know not the things which shall befall us during the year, the week the day which has begun. It is enough for the child of God to know tha his strength shall be equal to his day. He knows not, he would no know, what the day before him shall bring forth. The powerfu influences of the Holy Spirit bind the true Christian to his duty. Eve when he expects persecution and affliction, the love of Chris constrains him to proceed. None of these things moved Paul from his work; they did not deprive him of his comfort. It is the business of our life to provide for a joyful death. Believing that this was the last time they should see him, he appeals concerning his integrity. He had preached to them the whole counsel of God. As he had preached to them the gospel purely, so he had preached it to them entire; he faithfully did his work, whether men would bear or forbear.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    ως
    5613 ADV ουδεν 3762 A-ASN υπεστειλαμην 5288 5668 V-AMI-1S των 3588 T-GPN συμφεροντων 4851 5723 V-PAP-GPN του 3588 T-GSM μη 3361 PRT-N αναγγειλαι 312 5658 V-AAN υμιν 5213 P-2DP και 2532 CONJ διδαξαι 1321 5658 V-AAN υμας 5209 P-2AP δημοσια 1219 A-DSF 1219 ADV και 2532 CONJ κατ 2596 PREP οικους 3624 N-APM

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    20. Kept back (upesteilamhn). A picturesque word. Originally, to draw in or contract. Used of furling
    sails, and of closing the fingers; of drawing back for shelter; of keeping back one's real thoughts; by physicians, of withholding food from patients. It is rather straining a point to say, as Canon Farrar, that Paul is using a nautical metaphor suggested by his constantly hearing the word for furling sail used during his voyage. Paul's metaphors lie mainly on the lines of military life, architecture, agriculture, and the Grecian games. The statement of Canon Farrar, that he "constantly draws his metaphors from the sights and circumstances immediately around him," is rather at variance with his remark that, with one exception, he "cannot find a single word which shows that Paul had even the smallest susceptibility for the works of nature" ("Paul," i., 19). Nautical metaphors are, to say the least, not common in Paul's writings. I believe there are but three instances: Eph. iv. 14; 1 Tim. i. 19; vi. 9. Paul means here that he suppressed nothing of the truth through fear of giving offense. Compare Gal. ii. 12; Heb. x. 38.

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    20:20 {How that I shrank not} (hws ouden hupesteilamen). Still indirect
    discourse (question) after epistasqe (ye know) with hws like pws in verse #18. First aorist middle of hupostellw, old verb to draw under or back. It was so used of drawing back or down sails on a ship and, as Paul had so recently been on the sea, that may be the metaphor here. But it is not necessarily so as the direct middle here makes good sense and is frequent, to withdraw oneself, to cower, to shrink, to conceal, to dissemble as in #Hab 2:4 (#Heb 10:38). Demosthenes so used it to shrink from declaring out of fear for others. this open candor of Paul is supported by his Epistles (#1Th 2:4,11; 2Co 4:2; Ga 1:10). {From declaring unto you} (tou me anaggeilai humin). Ablative case of the articular first aorist active infinitive of anaggellw with the redundant negative after verbs of hindering, etc. (Robertson, _Grammar_, p. 1094). {Anything that was profitable} (twn sumferontwn). Partitive genitive after ouden of the articular present active participle of sumferw, to bear together, be profitable. {Publicly} (demosiai, adverb) {and from house to house} (kai kat' oikous). By (according to) houses. It is worth noting that this greatest of preachers preached from house to house and did not make his visits merely social calls. He was doing kingdom business all the while as in the house of Aquila and Priscilla (#1Co 16:19).


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38

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