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  • PARALLEL HISTORY BIBLE - Isaiah 28:20


    CHAPTERS: Isaiah 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS   |   VIDEO: BIB


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    LXX- Greek Septuagint - Isaiah 28:20

    στενοχωρουμενοι 4729 5746 ου 3739 3757 δυναμεθα 1410 5736 μαχεσθαι 3164 5738 αυτοι 846 δε 1161 ασθενουμεν 770 5719 του 3588 ημας 2248 συναχθηναι 4863 5683

    Douay Rheims Bible

    For the
    bed is straitened, so that one must fall out, and a short covering can- not cover both.

    King James Bible - Isaiah 28:20

    For the
    bed is shorter than that a man can stretch himself on it: and the covering narrower than that he can wrap himself in it.

    World English Bible

    For the
    bed is too short to stretch out on, and the blanket is too narrow to wrap oneself in.

    World Wide Bible Resources


    Isaiah 28:20

    Early Christian Commentary - (A.D. 100 - A.D. 325)

    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 11.

    And when He had repudiated holocausts, and sacrifices, and oblations, as likewise the new moons, and the sabbaths, and the festivals, and all the rest of the services accompanying these, He continues, exhorting them to what pertained to salvation: “Wash you, make you clean, take away wickedness from your hearts from before mine eyes: cease from your evil ways, learn to do well, seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, judge the fatherless, plead for the widow; and come, let us reason together, saith the Lord.”


    Anf-01 vi.ii.ii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 11–14, from the Sept., as is the case throughout. We have given the quotation as it stands in Cod. Sin.

    <index subject1="Law of Christ" title="138" id="vi.ii.ii-p4.2"/>He has therefore abolished these things, that the new law of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is without the yoke of necessity, might have a human oblation.1459

    1459 Thus in the Latin. The Greek reads, “might not have a man-made oblation.” The Latin text seems preferable, implying that, instead of the outward sacrifices of the law, there is now required a dedication of man himself. Hilgenfeld follows the Greek.

    And again He says to them, “Did I command your fathers, when they went out from the land of Egypt, to offer unto Me burnt-offerings and sacrifices? But this rather I commanded them, Let no one of you cherish any evil in his heart against his neighbour, and love not an oath of falsehood.”1460

    1460


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 116.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 27.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 14
    Comp. Isa. i. 11–14, especially in the LXX.

    for “from the rising sun unto the setting, my Name hath been made famous among all the nations, saith the Lord.”1209

    1209


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 12
    Isa. i. 11.

    —He meant nothing else than this to be understood, that He had never really required such homage for Himself. For He says, “I will not eat the flesh of bulls;”2973

    2973


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 12
    Isa. i. 11.

    —so spiritual sacrifices are predicted1207

    1207 Or, “foretold.”

    as accepted, as the prophets announce.  For, “even if ye shall have brought me,” He says, “the finest wheat flour, it is a vain supplicatory gift: a thing execrable to me;” and again He says, “Your holocausts and sacrifices, and the fat of goats, and blood of bulls, I will not, not even if ye come to be seen by me: for who hath required these things from your hands?”1208

    1208


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xxviii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 11. See the LXX.

    What, then, God has required the Gospel teaches.  “An hour will come,” saith He, “when the true adorers shall adore the Father in spirit and truth. For God is a Spirit, and accordingly requires His adorers to be such.”8938

    8938


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xviii Pg 11
    Isa. i. 11, 12.

    But he should see herein a careful provision2921

    2921 Industriam.

    on God’s part, which showed His wish to bind to His own religion a people who were prone to idolatry and transgression by that kind of services wherein consisted the superstition of that period; that He might call them away therefrom, while requesting it to be performed to Himself, as if He desired that no sin should be committed in making idols.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 18
    See Isa. i. 11–14.

    By calling them yours, as having been performed2979

    2979 Fecerat seems the better reading: q.d. “which he had performed,” etc. Oehler reads fecerant.

    after the giver’s own will, and not according to the religion of God (since he displayed them as his own, and not as God’s), the Almighty in this passage, demonstrated how suitable to the conditions of the case, and how reasonable, was His rejection of those very offerings which He had commanded to be made to Him.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 15.

    and again, “Woe! sinful nation; a people full of sins; wicked sons; ye have quite forsaken God, and have provoked unto indignation the Holy One of Israel.”1169

    1169


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xiv Pg 5
    Isa. i. 15.

    for fear Christ should utterly shudder.  We, however, not only raise, but even expand them; and, taking our model from the Lord’s passion8849

    8849 i.e. from the expansion of the hands on the cross.

    even in prayer we confess8850

    8850 Or, “give praise.”

    to Christ.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 11.

    And when He had repudiated holocausts, and sacrifices, and oblations, as likewise the new moons, and the sabbaths, and the festivals, and all the rest of the services accompanying these, He continues, exhorting them to what pertained to salvation: “Wash you, make you clean, take away wickedness from your hearts from before mine eyes: cease from your evil ways, learn to do well, seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, judge the fatherless, plead for the widow; and come, let us reason together, saith the Lord.”


    Anf-01 vi.ii.ii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 11–14, from the Sept., as is the case throughout. We have given the quotation as it stands in Cod. Sin.

    <index subject1="Law of Christ" title="138" id="vi.ii.ii-p4.2"/>He has therefore abolished these things, that the new law of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is without the yoke of necessity, might have a human oblation.1459

    1459 Thus in the Latin. The Greek reads, “might not have a man-made oblation.” The Latin text seems preferable, implying that, instead of the outward sacrifices of the law, there is now required a dedication of man himself. Hilgenfeld follows the Greek.

    And again He says to them, “Did I command your fathers, when they went out from the land of Egypt, to offer unto Me burnt-offerings and sacrifices? But this rather I commanded them, Let no one of you cherish any evil in his heart against his neighbour, and love not an oath of falsehood.”1460

    1460


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 116.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 27.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 14
    Comp. Isa. i. 11–14, especially in the LXX.

    for “from the rising sun unto the setting, my Name hath been made famous among all the nations, saith the Lord.”1209

    1209


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 12
    Isa. i. 11.

    —He meant nothing else than this to be understood, that He had never really required such homage for Himself. For He says, “I will not eat the flesh of bulls;”2973

    2973


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 12
    Isa. i. 11.

    —so spiritual sacrifices are predicted1207

    1207 Or, “foretold.”

    as accepted, as the prophets announce.  For, “even if ye shall have brought me,” He says, “the finest wheat flour, it is a vain supplicatory gift: a thing execrable to me;” and again He says, “Your holocausts and sacrifices, and the fat of goats, and blood of bulls, I will not, not even if ye come to be seen by me: for who hath required these things from your hands?”1208

    1208


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xxviii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 11. See the LXX.

    What, then, God has required the Gospel teaches.  “An hour will come,” saith He, “when the true adorers shall adore the Father in spirit and truth. For God is a Spirit, and accordingly requires His adorers to be such.”8938

    8938


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xviii Pg 11
    Isa. i. 11, 12.

    But he should see herein a careful provision2921

    2921 Industriam.

    on God’s part, which showed His wish to bind to His own religion a people who were prone to idolatry and transgression by that kind of services wherein consisted the superstition of that period; that He might call them away therefrom, while requesting it to be performed to Himself, as if He desired that no sin should be committed in making idols.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 18
    See Isa. i. 11–14.

    By calling them yours, as having been performed2979

    2979 Fecerat seems the better reading: q.d. “which he had performed,” etc. Oehler reads fecerant.

    after the giver’s own will, and not according to the religion of God (since he displayed them as his own, and not as God’s), the Almighty in this passage, demonstrated how suitable to the conditions of the case, and how reasonable, was His rejection of those very offerings which He had commanded to be made to Him.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 15.

    and again, “Woe! sinful nation; a people full of sins; wicked sons; ye have quite forsaken God, and have provoked unto indignation the Holy One of Israel.”1169

    1169


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xiv Pg 5
    Isa. i. 15.

    for fear Christ should utterly shudder.  We, however, not only raise, but even expand them; and, taking our model from the Lord’s passion8849

    8849 i.e. from the expansion of the hands on the cross.

    even in prayer we confess8850

    8850 Or, “give praise.”

    to Christ.


    Anf-01 viii.iv.cxl Pg 3
    Isa. xxix. 13.

    <index subject1="Jews" subject2="they boast in vain that they are the true sons of Abraham" title="269" id="viii.iv.cxl-p3.2"/>And besides, they beguile themselves and you, supposing that the everlasting kingdom will be assuredly given to those of the dispersion who are of Abraham after the flesh, although they be sinners, and faithless, and disobedient towards God, which the Scriptures have proved is not the case. For if so, Isaiah would never have said this: ‘And unless the Lord of Sabaoth had left us a seed, we would have been like Sodom and Gomorrah.’2484

    2484


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xv Pg 2
    Isa. xxix. 13; Matt. xv. 8; Mark vii. 6.

    And again: “They bless with their mouth, but curse with their heart.”61

    61


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xlviii Pg 3
    Comp. Isa. xxix. 13.

    <index subject1="Christ Jesus" title="219" id="viii.iv.xlviii-p3.2"/><index subject1="Christ Jesus" subject2="the Son of God" title="219" id="viii.iv.xlviii-p3.3"/><index subject1="Christ Jesus" subject2="His humanity" title="219" id="viii.iv.xlviii-p3.4"/>Now assuredly, Trypho,” I continued,” [the proof] that this man2096

    2096 Or, “such a man.”

    is the Christ of God does not fail, though I be unable to prove that He existed formerly as Son of the Maker of all things, being God, and was born a man by the Virgin. But since I have certainly proved that this man is the Christ of God, whoever He be, even if I do not prove that He pre-existed, and submitted to be born a man of like passions with us, having a body, according to the Father’s will; in this last matter alone is it just to say that I have erred, and not to deny that He is the Christ, though it should appear that He was born man of men, and [nothing more] is proved [than this], that He has become Christ by election. <index subject1="Human doctrine" title="219" id="viii.iv.xlviii-p4.1"/>For there are some, my friends,” I said, “of our race,2097

    2097 Some read, “of your race,” referring to the Ebionites. Maranus believes the reference is to the Ebionites, and supports in a long note the reading “our,” inasmuch as Justin would be more likely to associate these Ebionites with Christians than with Jews, even though they were heretics.

    who admit that He is Christ, while holding Him to be man of men; with whom I do not agree, nor would I,2098

    2098 Langus translates: “Nor would, indeed, many who are of the same opinion as myself say so.”

    even though most of those who have [now] the same opinions as myself should say so; since we were enjoined by Christ Himself to put no faith in human doctrines,2099

    2099 [Note this emphatic testimony of primitive faith.]

    but in those proclaimed by the blessed prophets and taught by Himself.”


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xiii Pg 11
    Isa. xxix. 13.

    He does not call the law given by Moses commandments of men, but the traditions of the elders themselves which they had invented, and in upholding which they made the law of God of none effect, and were on this account also not subject to His Word. <index subject1="Christ" subject2="is the end of the law" title="476" id="ix.vi.xiii-p11.2"/>For this is what Paul says concerning these men: “For they, being ignorant of God’s righteousness, and going about to establish their own righteousness, have not submitted themselves to the righteousness of God. For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth.”3943

    3943


    Anf-01 viii.iv.lxxviii Pg 8
    Isa. xxix. 13, 14.



    Anf-02 ii.iii.xii Pg 16.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.ix Pg 9.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.viii Pg 10.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xiv Pg 6.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.v Pg 26.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xii Pg 41
    Isa. xxix. 13.

    He has yet put His own Sabbaths (those, that is, which were kept according to His prescription) in a different position; for by the same prophet, in a later passage,3892

    3892


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xvii Pg 46
    Isa. xxix. 13.

    Otherwise, how absurd it were that a new god, a new Christ, the revealer of a new and so grand a religion should denounce as obstinate and disobedient those whom he had never had it in his power to make trial of!


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xli Pg 11
    Isa. xxix. 13.

    When led before the council, He is asked whether He is the Christ.5103

    5103


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xi Pg 33
    Isa. xxix. 13.

    in these angry words: “Ye shall hear with your ears, and not understand; and see with your eyes, but not perceive;”5710

    5710


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.xiv Pg 28
    Isa. xxix. 13 (Sept.)

    moreover, as “having gathered themselves together against the Lord and against His Christ5863

    5863


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 4.1


    Anf-01 v.xviii.v Pg 2
    2 Kings xxii.; xxiii.

    To such an extent did he display zeal in the cause of godliness, and prove himself a punisher of the ungodly, while he as yet faltered in speech like a child. <index subject1="Samuel" title="121" id="v.xviii.v-p2.2"/>David, too, who was at once a prophet and a king, and the root of our Saviour according to the flesh, while yet a youth is anointed by Samuel to be king.1371

    1371


    Anf-01 v.xviii.v Pg 2
    2 Kings xxii.; xxiii.

    To such an extent did he display zeal in the cause of godliness, and prove himself a punisher of the ungodly, while he as yet faltered in speech like a child. <index subject1="Samuel" title="121" id="v.xviii.v-p2.2"/>David, too, who was at once a prophet and a king, and the root of our Saviour according to the flesh, while yet a youth is anointed by Samuel to be king.1371

    1371


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 52.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 52.1


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xi Pg 22
    Lam. iv. 20, after LXX.

    But salvation, as being flesh: for “the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us.”3414

    3414


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxx Pg 2
    Ex. ix. 35.

    Those, then, who allege such difficulties, do not read in the Gospel that passage where the Lord replied to the disciples, when they asked Him, “Why speakest Thou unto them in parables?”—“Because it is given unto you to know the mystery of the kingdom of heaven; but to them I speak in parables, that seeing they may not see, and hearing they may not hear, understanding they may not understand; in order that the prophecy of Isaiah regarding them may be fulfilled, saying, Make the heart of this people gross and make their ears dull, and blind their eyes. But blessed are your eyes, which see the things that ye see; and your ears, which hear what ye do hear.”4209

    4209


    Anf-01 ii.ii.li Pg 5
    Ex. xiv.

    for no other reason than that their foolish hearts were hardened, after so many signs and wonders had been wrought in the land of Egypt by Moses the servant of God.


    Anf-01 ii.ii.li Pg 5
    Ex. xiv.

    for no other reason than that their foolish hearts were hardened, after so many signs and wonders had been wrought in the land of Egypt by Moses the servant of God.


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 11.

    And when He had repudiated holocausts, and sacrifices, and oblations, as likewise the new moons, and the sabbaths, and the festivals, and all the rest of the services accompanying these, He continues, exhorting them to what pertained to salvation: “Wash you, make you clean, take away wickedness from your hearts from before mine eyes: cease from your evil ways, learn to do well, seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, judge the fatherless, plead for the widow; and come, let us reason together, saith the Lord.”


    Anf-01 vi.ii.ii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 11–14, from the Sept., as is the case throughout. We have given the quotation as it stands in Cod. Sin.

    <index subject1="Law of Christ" title="138" id="vi.ii.ii-p4.2"/>He has therefore abolished these things, that the new law of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is without the yoke of necessity, might have a human oblation.1459

    1459 Thus in the Latin. The Greek reads, “might not have a man-made oblation.” The Latin text seems preferable, implying that, instead of the outward sacrifices of the law, there is now required a dedication of man himself. Hilgenfeld follows the Greek.

    And again He says to them, “Did I command your fathers, when they went out from the land of Egypt, to offer unto Me burnt-offerings and sacrifices? But this rather I commanded them, Let no one of you cherish any evil in his heart against his neighbour, and love not an oath of falsehood.”1460

    1460


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 116.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 27.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 14
    Comp. Isa. i. 11–14, especially in the LXX.

    for “from the rising sun unto the setting, my Name hath been made famous among all the nations, saith the Lord.”1209

    1209


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 12
    Isa. i. 11.

    —He meant nothing else than this to be understood, that He had never really required such homage for Himself. For He says, “I will not eat the flesh of bulls;”2973

    2973


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 12
    Isa. i. 11.

    —so spiritual sacrifices are predicted1207

    1207 Or, “foretold.”

    as accepted, as the prophets announce.  For, “even if ye shall have brought me,” He says, “the finest wheat flour, it is a vain supplicatory gift: a thing execrable to me;” and again He says, “Your holocausts and sacrifices, and the fat of goats, and blood of bulls, I will not, not even if ye come to be seen by me: for who hath required these things from your hands?”1208

    1208


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xxviii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 11. See the LXX.

    What, then, God has required the Gospel teaches.  “An hour will come,” saith He, “when the true adorers shall adore the Father in spirit and truth. For God is a Spirit, and accordingly requires His adorers to be such.”8938

    8938


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xviii Pg 11
    Isa. i. 11, 12.

    But he should see herein a careful provision2921

    2921 Industriam.

    on God’s part, which showed His wish to bind to His own religion a people who were prone to idolatry and transgression by that kind of services wherein consisted the superstition of that period; that He might call them away therefrom, while requesting it to be performed to Himself, as if He desired that no sin should be committed in making idols.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 18
    See Isa. i. 11–14.

    By calling them yours, as having been performed2979

    2979 Fecerat seems the better reading: q.d. “which he had performed,” etc. Oehler reads fecerant.

    after the giver’s own will, and not according to the religion of God (since he displayed them as his own, and not as God’s), the Almighty in this passage, demonstrated how suitable to the conditions of the case, and how reasonable, was His rejection of those very offerings which He had commanded to be made to Him.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 15.

    and again, “Woe! sinful nation; a people full of sins; wicked sons; ye have quite forsaken God, and have provoked unto indignation the Holy One of Israel.”1169

    1169


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xiv Pg 5
    Isa. i. 15.

    for fear Christ should utterly shudder.  We, however, not only raise, but even expand them; and, taking our model from the Lord’s passion8849

    8849 i.e. from the expansion of the hands on the cross.

    even in prayer we confess8850

    8850 Or, “give praise.”

    to Christ.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iv Pg 30
    Amos v. 21.

    and again by Hosea, “I will cause to cease all her mirth, and her feast-days, and her sabbaths, and her new moons, and all her solemn assemblies.”5349

    5349


    Anf-01 ii.ii.lvii Pg 4
    Prov. i. 23–31. [Often cited by this name in primitive writers.]

    “Behold, I will bring forth to you the words of My Spirit, and I will teach you My speech. Since I called, and ye did not hear; I held forth My words, and ye regarded not, but set at naught My counsels, and yielded not at My reproofs; therefore I too will laugh at your destruction; yea, I will rejoice when ruin cometh upon you, and when sudden confusion overtakes you, when overturning presents itself like a tempest, or when tribulation and oppression fall upon you. For it shall come to pass, that when ye call upon Me, I will not hear you; the wicked shall seek Me, and they shall not find Me. For they hated wisdom, and did not choose the fear of the Lord; nor would they listen to My counsels, but despised My reproofs. Wherefore they shall eat the fruits of their own way, and they shall be filled with their own ungodliness.” …258

    258 Junius (Pat. Young), who examined the ms. before it was bound into its present form, stated that a whole leaf was here lost. The next letters that occur are ιπον, which have been supposed to indicate εἶπον or ἔλιπον. Doubtless some passages quoted by the ancients from the Epistle of Clement, and not now found in it, occurred in the portion which has thus been lost.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 27
    Oehler refers to Isa. xix. 1. See, too, Isa. xxx. and xxxi.

    So, again, Babylon, in our own John, is a figure of the city Rome, as being equally great and proud of her sway, and triumphant over the saints.1273

    1273


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.x Pg 16.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxvii Pg 6
    Jer. xxiii. 20.

    For every prophecy, before its fulfilment, is to men [full of] enigmas and ambiguities. But when the time has arrived, and the prediction has come to pass, then the prophecies have a clear and certain exposition. And for this reason, indeed, when at this present time the law is read to the Jews, it is like a fable; for they do not possess the explanation of all things pertaining to the advent of the Son of God, which took place in human nature; but when it is read by the Christians, it is a treasure, hid indeed in a field, but brought to light by the cross of Christ, and explained, both enriching the understanding of men, and showing forth the wisdom of God and declaring His dispensations with regard to man, and forming the kingdom of Christ beforehand, and preaching by anticipation the inheritance of the holy Jerusalem, and proclaiming beforehand that the man who loves God shall arrive at such excellency as even to see God, and hear His word, and from the hearing of His discourse be glorified to such an extent, that others cannot behold the glory of his countenance, as was said by Daniel: “Those who do understand, shall shine as the brightness of the firmament, and many of the righteous4154

    4154 The Latin is “a multis justis,” corresponding to the Greek version of the Hebrew text. If the translation be supposed as corresponding to the Hebrew comparative, the English equivalent will be, “and above (more than) many righteous.”

    as the stars for ever and ever.”4155

    4155


    Anf-01 viii.iv.xxv Pg 5
    Isa. lxiii. 15 to end, and Isa. lxiv.


    Anf-03 vi.vii.x Pg 9
    Isa. lxiv. 6.

    —earthen vessels.9118

    9118 *marg:


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxi Pg 31
    Isa. vi. 5.

    pointing out that man should behold God with his eyes, and hear His voice. In this manner, therefore, did they also see the Son of God as a man conversant with men, while they prophesied what was to happen, saying that He who was not come as yet was present proclaiming also the impassible as subject to suffering, and declaring that He who was then in heaven had descended into the dust of death.4086

    4086


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xvi Pg 6
    Isa. liii. The reader will observe how often the text of the Septuagint, here quoted, differs from the Hebrew as represented by our authorized English version.

    And again He saith, “I am a worm, and no man; a reproach of men, and despised of the people. All that see Me have derided Me; they have spoken with their lips; they have wagged their head, [saying] He hoped in God, let Him deliver Him, let Him save Him, since He delighteth in Him.”71

    71


    Anf-02 vi.iii.i.viii Pg 20.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xiv Pg 48
    Famulis et magistratibus. It is uncertain what passage this quotation represents. It sounds like some of the clauses of Isa. liii.

    Now, since hatred was predicted against that Son of man who has His mission from the Creator, whilst the Gospel testifies that the name of Christians, as derived from Christ, was to be hated for the Son of man’s sake, because He is Christ, it determines the point that that was the Son of man in the matter of hatred who came according to the Creator’s purpose, and against whom the hatred was predicted. And even if He had not yet come, the hatred of His name which exists at the present day could not in any case have possibly preceded Him who was to bear the name.3980

    3980 Personam nominis.

    But He has both suffered the penalty3981

    3981 Sancitur.

    in our presence, and surrendered His life, laying it down for our sakes, and is held in contempt by the Gentiles. And He who was born (into the world) will be that very Son of man on whose account our name also is rejected.


    Anf-03 v.ix.xxx Pg 5
    This is the sense rather than the words of Isa. liii. 5, 6.

    In this manner He “forsook” Him, in not sparing Him; “forsook” Him, in delivering Him up. In all other respects the Father did not forsake the Son, for it was into His Father’s hands that the Son commended His spirit.8189

    8189


    Npnf-201 iv.viii.xvi Pg 16


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xvii Pg 5
    Job xiv. 4, 5. [Septuagint.]

    <index subject1="Moses" title="10" id="ii.ii.xvii-p5.2"/>Moses was called faithful in all God’s house;76

    76


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xi Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iii Pg 229.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 51.1


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xviii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 11.

    And when He had repudiated holocausts, and sacrifices, and oblations, as likewise the new moons, and the sabbaths, and the festivals, and all the rest of the services accompanying these, He continues, exhorting them to what pertained to salvation: “Wash you, make you clean, take away wickedness from your hearts from before mine eyes: cease from your evil ways, learn to do well, seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, judge the fatherless, plead for the widow; and come, let us reason together, saith the Lord.”


    Anf-01 vi.ii.ii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 11–14, from the Sept., as is the case throughout. We have given the quotation as it stands in Cod. Sin.

    <index subject1="Law of Christ" title="138" id="vi.ii.ii-p4.2"/>He has therefore abolished these things, that the new law of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is without the yoke of necessity, might have a human oblation.1459

    1459 Thus in the Latin. The Greek reads, “might not have a man-made oblation.” The Latin text seems preferable, implying that, instead of the outward sacrifices of the law, there is now required a dedication of man himself. Hilgenfeld follows the Greek.

    And again He says to them, “Did I command your fathers, when they went out from the land of Egypt, to offer unto Me burnt-offerings and sacrifices? But this rather I commanded them, Let no one of you cherish any evil in his heart against his neighbour, and love not an oath of falsehood.”1460

    1460


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 5.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.xiv Pg 116.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.iii.xii Pg 27.1


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 14
    Comp. Isa. i. 11–14, especially in the LXX.

    for “from the rising sun unto the setting, my Name hath been made famous among all the nations, saith the Lord.”1209

    1209


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 12
    Isa. i. 11.

    —He meant nothing else than this to be understood, that He had never really required such homage for Himself. For He says, “I will not eat the flesh of bulls;”2973

    2973


    Anf-03 iv.ix.v Pg 12
    Isa. i. 11.

    —so spiritual sacrifices are predicted1207

    1207 Or, “foretold.”

    as accepted, as the prophets announce.  For, “even if ye shall have brought me,” He says, “the finest wheat flour, it is a vain supplicatory gift: a thing execrable to me;” and again He says, “Your holocausts and sacrifices, and the fat of goats, and blood of bulls, I will not, not even if ye come to be seen by me: for who hath required these things from your hands?”1208

    1208


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xxviii Pg 4
    Isa. i. 11. See the LXX.

    What, then, God has required the Gospel teaches.  “An hour will come,” saith He, “when the true adorers shall adore the Father in spirit and truth. For God is a Spirit, and accordingly requires His adorers to be such.”8938

    8938


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xviii Pg 11
    Isa. i. 11, 12.

    But he should see herein a careful provision2921

    2921 Industriam.

    on God’s part, which showed His wish to bind to His own religion a people who were prone to idolatry and transgression by that kind of services wherein consisted the superstition of that period; that He might call them away therefrom, while requesting it to be performed to Himself, as if He desired that no sin should be committed in making idols.


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 18
    See Isa. i. 11–14.

    By calling them yours, as having been performed2979

    2979 Fecerat seems the better reading: q.d. “which he had performed,” etc. Oehler reads fecerant.

    after the giver’s own will, and not according to the religion of God (since he displayed them as his own, and not as God’s), the Almighty in this passage, demonstrated how suitable to the conditions of the case, and how reasonable, was His rejection of those very offerings which He had commanded to be made to Him.


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 15.

    and again, “Woe! sinful nation; a people full of sins; wicked sons; ye have quite forsaken God, and have provoked unto indignation the Holy One of Israel.”1169

    1169


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xiv Pg 5
    Isa. i. 15.

    for fear Christ should utterly shudder.  We, however, not only raise, but even expand them; and, taking our model from the Lord’s passion8849

    8849 i.e. from the expansion of the hands on the cross.

    even in prayer we confess8850

    8850 Or, “give praise.”

    to Christ.


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 4.1


    Anf-03 v.iv.vi.iv Pg 30
    Amos v. 21.

    and again by Hosea, “I will cause to cease all her mirth, and her feast-days, and her sabbaths, and her new moons, and all her solemn assemblies.”5349

    5349


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 39
    This passage it is not easy to identify. [See Is. lxiii. 3.] The books point to Isa. lxv. 5, but there is there no trace of it.

    Therefore He reckoned them “as the drop of a bucket,”4502

    4502


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxi Pg 26
    Joel iii. 16; Amos i. 2.

    And that it is from that region which is towards the south of the inheritance of Judah that the Son of God shall come, who is God, and who was from Bethlehem, where the Lord was born [and] will send out His praise through all the earth, thus3705

    3705 As Massuet observes, we must either expunge “sciut” altogether, or read “sic” as above.

    says the prophet Habakkuk: “God shall come from the south, and the Holy One from Mount Effrem. His power covered the heavens over, and the earth is full of His praise. Before His face shall go forth the Word, and His feet shall advance in the plains.”3706

    3706


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xxxiv Pg 65
    Joel iii. 16.

    and, “In Judah is God known;”4306

    4306


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxi Pg 26
    Joel iii. 16; Amos i. 2.

    And that it is from that region which is towards the south of the inheritance of Judah that the Son of God shall come, who is God, and who was from Bethlehem, where the Lord was born [and] will send out His praise through all the earth, thus3705

    3705 As Massuet observes, we must either expunge “sciut” altogether, or read “sic” as above.

    says the prophet Habakkuk: “God shall come from the south, and the Holy One from Mount Effrem. His power covered the heavens over, and the earth is full of His praise. Before His face shall go forth the Word, and His feet shall advance in the plains.”3706

    3706


    Anf-01 ix.iv.xxi Pg 26
    Joel iii. 16; Amos i. 2.

    And that it is from that region which is towards the south of the inheritance of Judah that the Son of God shall come, who is God, and who was from Bethlehem, where the Lord was born [and] will send out His praise through all the earth, thus3705

    3705 As Massuet observes, we must either expunge “sciut” altogether, or read “sic” as above.

    says the prophet Habakkuk: “God shall come from the south, and the Holy One from Mount Effrem. His power covered the heavens over, and the earth is full of His praise. Before His face shall go forth the Word, and His feet shall advance in the plains.”3706

    3706 :16)


    Anf-02 vi.iv.v.v Pg 2.1


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-01 ii.ii.vii Pg 3
    Gen. vii.; 1 Pet. iii. 20; 2 Pet. ii. 5.

    <index subject1="Jonah" title="7" id="ii.ii.vii-p3.4"/>Jonah proclaimed destruction to the Ninevites;37

    37


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-02 vi.iv.iv.xxi Pg 42.1


    Anf-02 vi.ii.viii Pg 28.1


    Anf-02 vi.iii.ii.xi Pg 41.1


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 v.iv.iii.xxii Pg 14
    An inexact quotation of Isa. xl .28.

    Although He had respect to the offerings of Abel, and smelled a sweet savour from the holocaust of Noah, yet what pleasure could He receive from the flesh of sheep, or the odour of burning victims? And yet the simple and God-fearing mind of those who offered what they were receiving from God, both in the way of food and of a sweet smell, was favourably accepted before God, in the sense of respectful homage2975

    2975 Honorem.

    to God, who did not so much want what was offered, as that which prompted the offering. Suppose now, that some dependant were to offer to a rich man or a king, who was in want of nothing, some very insignificant gift, will the amount and quality of the gift bring dishonour2976

    2976 Infuscabit.

    to the rich man and the king; or will the consideration2977

    2977 Titulus.

    of the homage give them pleasure? Were, however, the dependant, either of his own accord or even in compliance with a command, to present to him gifts suitably to his rank, and were he to observe the solemnities due to a king, only without faith and purity of heart, and without any readiness for other acts of obedience, will not that king or rich man consequently exclaim: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? I am full of your solemnities, your feast-days, and your Sabbaths.”2978

    2978


    Anf-01 ix.ii.xxv Pg 9
    This sentence is wholly unintelligible as it stands in the Latin version. Critics differ greatly as to its meaning; Harvey tries to bring out of it something like the translation given above. [This name is manufactured from a curious abuse of (קו לקו) Isa. xxviii. 10–13, which is variously understood. See (Epiphanius ed. Oehler, vol. i.) Philastr., p. 38.]


    Anf-03 iv.ix.viii Pg 10
    See Dan. ix . 24–; 27. It seemed best to render with the strictest literality, without regard to anything else; as an idea will thus then be given of the condition of the text, which, as it stands, differs widely, as will be seen, from the Hebrew and also from the LXX., as it stands in the ed. Tisch. Lips. 1860, to which I always adapt my references.


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxv Pg 20
    Isa. xliv. 25, Sept.

    Now, if He has designated His Christ as an enlightener of the Gentiles, saying, “I have set thee for a light of the Gentiles;”4483

    4483


    Anf-03 v.ix.xix Pg 10
    Isa. xliv. 25.

    of His Son?”7997

    7997 On this reading, see our Anti-Marcion, p. 207, note 9. Edin.

    —as, for instance, when He said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him.”7998

    7998


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxii Pg 42
    Tertullian, by introducing this statement with an “inquit,” seems to make a quotation of it; but it is only a comment on the actual quotations. Tertullian’s invariable object in this argument is to match some event or word pertaining to the Christ of the New Testament with some declaration of the Old Testament. In this instance the approving words of God upon the mount are in Heb. i. 5 applied to the Son, while in Ps. ii. 7 the Son applies them to Himself. Compare the Adversus Praxean, chap. xix. (Fr. Junius and Oehler). It is, however, more likely that Tertullian really means to quote Isa. xliv. 26, “that confirmeth the word of His servant,” which Tertullian reads, “Sistens verba filii sui,” the Septuagint being, Καὶ ἰστῶν ῥῆμα παιδὸς αὐτοῦ.

    He establishes the words of His Son, when He says, “This is my beloved Son, hear ye Him.” Therefore, even if there be made a transfer of the obedienthearing” from Moses and Elias to4359

    4359 In Christo. In with an ablative is often used by our author for in with an accusative.

    Christ, it is still not from another God, or to another Christ; but from4360

    4360 Or perhaps “by the Creator.”

    the Creator to His Christ, in consequence of the departure of the old covenant and the supervening of the new. “Not an ambassador, nor an angel, but He Himself,” says Isaiah, “shall save them;”4361

    4361


    Anf-01 ii.ii.xxxv Pg 9
    Ps. l. 16–23. The reader will observe how the Septuagint followed by Clement differs from the Hebrew.


    knowledge,155

    155 Or, “knowledge of immortality.”

    “who, being the brightness of His majesty, is by so much greater than the angels, as He hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”156

    156


    Anf-03 v.x.ii Pg 12
    Deut. xiii. 1.

    But also in another section,8238

    8238 Of course our division of the Scripture by chapter and verse did not exist in the days of Tertullian.—Tr.

    “If, however, thy brother, the son of thy father or of thy mother, or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend who is as thine own soul, solicit thee, saying secretly, Let us go and serve other gods, which thou knowest not, nor did thy fathers, of the gods of the nations which are round about thee, very nigh unto thee or far off from thee, do not consent to go with him, and do not hearken to him. Thine eye shall not spare him, neither shalt thou pity, neither shalt thou preserve him; thou shalt certainly inform upon him.  Thine hand shall be first upon him to kill him, and afterwards the hand of thy people; and ye shall stone him, and he shall die, seeing he has sought to turn thee away from the Lord thy God.”8239

    8239


    Anf-01 v.vi.iii Pg 8
    Deut. xiii. 6; 18.

    You ought therefore to “hate those that hate God, and to waste away [with grief] on account of His enemies.”899

    899


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xv Pg 51
    Isa. iii. 12.

    In another passage He forbids all implicit trust in man, and likewise in the applause of man; as by the prophet Jeremiah: “Cursed be the man that trusteth in man.”4031

    4031


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 27
    Oehler refers to Isa. xix. 1. See, too, Isa. xxx. and xxxi.

    So, again, Babylon, in our own John, is a figure of the city Rome, as being equally great and proud of her sway, and triumphant over the saints.1273

    1273


    Anf-02 vi.iv.ii.xviii Pg 4.1


    Anf-01 vi.ii.ix Pg 10
    Isa. i. 10.

    And again He saith, “Hear, ye children, the voice of one crying in the wilderness.”1557

    1557 Cod. Sin. reads, “it is the voice,” corrected, however, as above.

    Therefore He hath circumcised our ears, that we might hear His word and believe, for the circumcision in which they trusted is abolished.1558


    Anf-01 ix.vi.xlii Pg 14
    Isa. i. 10.

    intimating that they were like the Sodomites in wickedness, and that the same description of sins was rife among them, calling them by the same name, because of the similarity of their conduct. And inasmuch as they were not by nature so created by God, but had power also to act rightly, the same person said to them, giving them good counsel, “Wash ye, make you clean; take away iniquity from your souls before mine eyes; cease from your iniquities.”4447

    4447


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 22
    Isa. i. 10.

    when those cities had already long been extinct.1268

    1268


    Anf-03 v.iv.iv.xiii Pg 28
    Isa. i. 10.

    And in another passage He also says: “Thy father was an Amorite, and thy mother an Hittite,”3281

    3281


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxvii Pg 25
    Isa. i. 10.

    who forbids us “to put confidence even in princes,”4598

    4598


    Anf-03 v.iv.v.xxi Pg 36
    Isa. lvii. i.

    When does this more frequently happen than in the persecution of His saints? This, indeed, is no ordinary matter,4291

    4291 We have, by understanding res, treated these adjectives as nouns. Rigalt. applies them to the doctrina of the sentence just previous. Perhaps, however, “persecutione” is the noun.

    no common casualty of the law of nature; but it is that illustrious devotion, that fighting for the faith, wherein whosoever loses his life for God saves it, so that you may here again recognize the Judge who recompenses the evil gain of life with its destruction, and the good loss thereof with its salvation. It is, however, a jealous God whom He here presents to me; one who returns evil for evil.  “For whosoever,” says He, “shall be ashamed of me, of him will I also be ashamed.”4292

    4292


    Anf-03 iv.ix.iii Pg 9
    Isa. i. 15.

    and again, “Woe! sinful nation; a people full of sins; wicked sons; ye have quite forsaken God, and have provoked unto indignation the Holy One of Israel.”1169

    1169


    Anf-03 vi.iv.xiv Pg 5
    Isa. i. 15.

    for fear Christ should utterly shudder.  We, however, not only raise, but even expand them; and, taking our model from the Lord’s passion8849

    8849 i.e. from the expansion of the hands on the cross.

    even in prayer we confess8850

    8850 Or, “give praise.”

    to Christ.


    Anf-01 viii.ii.xxxv Pg 4
    Isa. lxv. 2, Isa. lviii. 2.

    And again in other words, through another prophet, He says, “They pierced My hands and My feet, and for My vesture they cast lots.”1837

    1837


    Anf-03 iv.ix.ix Pg 69
    See Isa. lviii. 1, 2, especially in LXX.

    that, moreover, He was to do acts of power from the Father: “Behold, our God will deal retributive judgment; Himself will come and save us:  then shall the infirm be healed, and the eyes of the blind shall see, and the ears of the deaf shall hear, and the mutes’ tongues shall be loosed, and the lame shall leap as an hart,”1311

    1311


    Anf-01 vi.ii.iii Pg 2
    Isa. lviii. 4, 5.

    To us He saith, “Behold, this is the fast that I have chosen, saith the Lord, not that a man should humble his soul, but that he should loose every band of iniquity, untie the fastenings of harsh agreements, restore to liberty them that are bruised, tear in pieces every unjust engagement, feed the hungry with thy bread, clothe the naked when thou seest him, bring the homeless into thy house, not despise the humble if thou behold him, and not [turn away] from the members of thine own family. Then shall thy dawn break forth, and thy healing shall quickly spring up, and righteousness shall go forth before thee, and the glory of God shall encompass thee; and then thou shalt call, and God shall hear thee; whilst thou art yet speaking, He shall say, Behold, I am with thee; if thou take away from thee the chain [binding others], and the stretching forth of the hands1465

    1465 The original here is χειροτονίαν, from the LXX. Hefele remarks, that it may refer to the stretching forth of the hands, either to swear falsely, or to mock and insult one’s neighbour.

    [to swear falsely], and words of murmuring, and give cheerfully thy bread to the hungry, and show compassion to the soul that has been humbled.”1466

    1466


    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Chapter 28

    VERSE 	(20) - 

    Isa 57:12,13; 59:5,6; 64:6; 66:3-6 Jer 7:8-10 Ro 9:30-32 1Co 1:18-31


    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET