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  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 13:13


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     

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    King James Bible - Acts 13:13

    Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem.

    World English Bible

    Now Paul and his
    company set sail from Paphos, and came to Perga in Pamphylia. John departed from them and returned to Jerusalem.

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 13:13

    Now when Paul and they that were with him had sailed from Paphos, they came to Perge in Pamphylia. And John departing from them, returned to Jerusalem.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    Now when Paul and his
    company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia. And John departing from them, returned to Jerusalem.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    αναχθεντες
    321 5685 V-APP-NPM δε 1161 CONJ απο 575 PREP της 3588 T-GSF παφου 3974 N-GSF οι 3588 T-NPM περι 4012 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM παυλον 3972 N-ASM ηλθον 2064 5627 V-2AAI-3P εις 1519 PREP περγην 4011 N-ASF της 3588 T-GSF παμφυλιας 3828 N-GSF ιωαννης 2491 N-NSM δε 1161 CONJ αποχωρησας 672 5660 V-AAP-NSM απ 575 PREP αυτων 846 P-GPM υπεστρεψεν 5290 5656 V-AAI-3S εις 1519 PREP ιεροσολυμα 2414 N-ASF

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (13) -
    :6; 27:13

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 13:13

    Y zarpados de Pafos, Pablo y sus compaeros arribaron a Perge de Panfilia; entonces Juan, apartndose de ellos, se volvi a Jerusaln.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 13:13

    Verse 13.
    Paul and his company loosed from Paphos] They sailed away from this island, leaving, it may be presumed, Elymas a sincere and deeply humbled penitent; and Sergius Paul, a thorough and happy believer in the doctrine of Christ.

    Previously to this time, St. Luke always mentions Barnabas before Paul; but after this he mentions Paul always first; probably after seeing how God had distinguished him in the late proceedings at Cyprus; as much of the Holy Spirit now rested upon him.

    They came to Perga in Pamphylia] As Perga was not a maritime town, it is conjectured that the apostles sailed up the river Cestrus, in order to come to this place, which, according to Strabo, was situated about sixty leagues up this river, and near to which was a famous temple dedicated to Diana. For Pamphylia, see chap. ii. 10.

    And John departing from them] Why John Mark left his brethren at this place we are not informed; probably he went to visit his pious mother Mary at Jerusalem, and to see Peter, to whom he is supposed to have been much attached. It certainly was not with the approbation of Paul that he left them at this place, as we learn from chap. xv. 38; yet his departure does not seem to have merited the displeasure of Barnabas; for John Mark having met these apostles at Antioch, when Paul purposed to revisit the various places where they had planted the word of God, Barnabas was willing to take him with them; but Paul would not consent, because he had departed from them from Pamphylia, and went not with them to the work, chap. xv. 35-39, and this occasioned a separation between Barnabas and Paul. It does not appear that John Mark was under any obligation to accompany them any longer or any farther than he pleased. He seems to have been little else than their servant, and certainly was not divinely appointed to this work, as they were; and consequently might leave them innocently, though not kindly, if they could not readily supply his place.

    In this respect John Mark might be to blame; but Barnabas, whose nephew he was, could look over this fault more easily than Paul, who could not find those motives to pass by what was reprehensible in his conduct which natural affection might furnish to his brother apostle.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 13. Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos , etc.] Which was upon the sea coast: so Jerom says, that Paphos was urbs maritima, a city on the sea coast of the island of Cyprus; it was on the western part of the island, to the west of which lay the sea of Pamphylia, over which the apostle, and his company, sailed to the place next mentioned, which was in Pamphylia; and so Apollonius Tyaneus f648 , having got a ship at Seleucia, is said to sail to Paphos in Cyprus; and from hence the apostle, and those that were with him, set sail; and as the Syriac version renders it, went by sea, or through the sea; that is, of Pamphylia; of which mention is made in ( Acts 27:5). They came to Perga in Pamphylia which country was before called Mopsopia; (See Gill on Acts 2:10) which now, with Cilicia, is called Caramania; and among the cities and towns in it, both Pliny and Ptolomy make mention of Perga; where was a famous temple of Diana, whence she was sometimes called Pergea f651 ; and every year a great feast was kept here in honour of her: it was the birth place of Apollonius, a very famous geometrician, who wrote eight books of conic sections, four of which are now extant f652 ; and who, from his native place, is called Apollonius Pergaeus f653 . It was situated between two great rivers, Oestros and Catarctes f654 ; and since grp , Parag, in the eastern languages, signifies to delight, perhaps it might be so called from its delightful situation. Hilleras observes, Pargi (or rather Perage), as is the word in the Syriac version of ( Matthew 23:37, Luke 2:24) with the Syrians signifies the young of birds, as of hens and doves; and so do Pargiia, Pargiot, and Perigin, with the Jewish Rabbins f656 ; which writer seems to suggest, that this place was so called from the multitude of fowls that were about it. And John departing from them returned to Jerusalem ; that is, John Mark, whom Paul and Barnabas took with them, and who was a minister to them: but what was the reason of his departure, whether for the sake of seeing his mother at Jerusalem; or because he did not like, but grew weary of the travels, labours, and fatigues of the apostle, and his company; or did not choose to go among the Gentiles, is not certain: however, his departure was resented by Paul; and it laid a foundation for a sharp contention between him and Barnabas, who was uncle to this John Mark, ( Acts 15:38,39) from whence it appears that it was not at Paphos in Cyprus, but at Perga in Pamphilia, that he left them, by which the mistake of some interpreters on this text must be corrected.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 4-13 -
    Satan is in a special manner busy with great men and men in power, to keep them from being religious, for their example will influence many Saul is here for the first time called Paul, and never after Saul. Sau was his name as he was a Hebrew; Paul was his name as he was a citize of Rome. Under the direct influence of the Holy Ghost, he gave Elyma his true character, but not in passion. A fulness of deceit an mischief together, make a man indeed a child of the devil. And thos who are enemies to the doctrine of Jesus, are enemies to all righteousness; for in it all righteousness is fulfilled. The ways of the Lord Jesus are the only right ways to heaven and happiness. Ther are many who not only wander from these ways themselves, but set other against these ways. They commonly are so hardened, that they will no cease to do evil. The proconsul was astonished at the force of the doctrine upon his own heart and conscience, and at the power of God by which it was confirmed. The doctrine of Christ astonishes; and the mor we know of it, the more reason we shall see to wonder at it. Those wh put their hand to the plough and look back, are not fit for the kingdo of God. Those who are not prepared to face opposition, and to endur hardship, are not fitted for the work of the ministry.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    αναχθεντες
    321 5685 V-APP-NPM δε 1161 CONJ απο 575 PREP της 3588 T-GSF παφου 3974 N-GSF οι 3588 T-NPM περι 4012 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM παυλον 3972 N-ASM ηλθον 2064 5627 V-2AAI-3P εις 1519 PREP περγην 4011 N-ASF της 3588 T-GSF παμφυλιας 3828 N-GSF ιωαννης 2491 N-NSM δε 1161 CONJ αποχωρησας 672 5660 V-AAP-NSM απ 575 PREP αυτων 846 P-GPM υπεστρεψεν 5290 5656 V-AAI-3S εις 1519 PREP ιεροσολυμα 2414 N-ASF

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    13. Loosed (anacqentev). See on
    Luke viii. 22.

    Paul and his company (oi peri ton Paulon). Lit., those around Paul. In later writers, used to denote the principal person alone, as John xi. 19, came to Mary and Martha; where the Greek literally reads, came to the women around Mary and Martha. Paul, and not Barnabas, now appears as the principal person.


    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    13:13 {Paul and his company} (hoi peri paulon). Neat Greek idiom as in Plato, Cratylus 440 C hoi peri herakleiton. On this idiom see Gildersleeve, _Syntax_, p. 264. It means a man and his followers, "those around Paul." Now Paul ranks first always in Acts save in #14:2; 15:12,25 for special reasons. Heretofore Saul (Paul) held a secondary position (#9:27; 11:30; 13:1f.). "In nothing is the greatness of Barnabas more manifest than in his recognition of the superiority of Paul and acceptance of a secondary position for himself" (Furneaux). {Set sail} (anacqentes). First aorist passive participle of anagw. Thirteen times in the Acts and #Lu 8:22 which see. They sailed up to sea and came down (katagw, katabainw) to land. So it looks. {Departed from them} (apocwresas ap' autwn). First aorist active participle of apocwrew, old verb to withdraw, go away from. In the N.T. only here and #Mt 7:23; Lu 9:39. He is called John there as in verse #5 and Mark in #15:39, though John Mark in #12:12,25. this may be accidental or on purpose (Deissmann, _Bible Studies_, p. 317). Luke is silent on John's reasons for leaving Paul and Barnabas. He was the cousin of Barnabas and may not have relished the change in leadership. There may have been change in plans also now that Paul is in command. Barnabas had chosen Cyprus and Paul has led them to Perga in Pamphylia and means to go on into the highlands to Antioch in Pisidia. There were perils of many sorts around them and ahead (#2Co 11:26), perils to which John Mark was unwilling to be exposed. Paul will specifically charge him at Antioch with desertion of his post (#Ac 15:39). It is possible, as Ramsay suggests, that the mosquitoes at Perga gave John malaria. If so, they bit Paul and Barnabas also. He may not have liked Paul's aggressive attitude towards the heathen. At any rate he went home to Jerusalem instead of to Antioch, _zu seiner Mutter_ (Holtzmann). It was a serious breach in the work, but Paul and Barnabas stuck to the work.


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