King James Bible Adam Clarke Bible Commentary Martin Luther's Writings Wesley's Sermons and Commentary Neurosemantics Audio / Video Bible Evolution Cruncher Creation Science Vincent New Testament Word Studies KJV Audio Bible Family videogames Christian author Godrules.NET Main Page Add to Favorites Godrules.NET Main Page




Bad Advertisement?

News & Reviews:
  • World News
  • Movie Reviews
  • Book Search

    Are you a Christian?

    Online Store:
  • Your Own eBook/eBay Business
  • Visit Our eBay Store

    Automated eBook Business



  • PARALLEL BIBLE - Acts 13:15


    CHAPTERS: Acts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28     

    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52

    TEXT: BIB   |   AUDIO: MISLR - MISC - DAVIS - FOCHT   |   VIDEO: BIB - COMM

    HELPS: KJS - KJV - ASV - DBY - DOU - WBS - YLT - HEB - BBE - WEB - NAS - SEV - TSK - CRK - WES - MHC - GILL - JFB


    ENGLISH - HISTORY - INTERNATIONAL - РУССКАЯ БИБЛИЯ - FACEBOOK - GR FORUMS - GODRULES ON YOUTUBE

    King James Bible - Acts 13:15

    And after the reading of the law and the prophets the rulers of the synagogue sent unto them, saying, Ye men and brethren, if ye have any word of exhortation for the people, say on.

    World English Bible

    After the
    reading of the law and the prophets, the rulers of the synagogue sent to them, saying, "Brothers, if you have any word of exhortation for the people, speak."

    Douay-Rheims - Acts 13:15

    And after the
    reading of the law and the prophets, the rulers of the synagogue sent to them, saying: Ye men, brethren, if you have any word of exhortation to make to the people, speak.

    Webster's Bible Translation

    And after the
    reading of the law and the prophets, the rulers of the synagogue sent to them, saying, Men, brethren, if ye have any word of exhortation for the people, speak.

    Greek Textus Receptus


    μετα
    3326 PREP δε 1161 CONJ την 3588 T-ASF αναγνωσιν 320 N-ASF του 3588 T-GSM νομου 3551 N-GSM και 2532 CONJ των 3588 T-GPM προφητων 4396 N-GPM απεστειλαν 649 5656 V-AAI-3P οι 3588 T-NPM αρχισυναγωγοι 752 N-NPM προς 4314 PREP αυτους 846 P-APM λεγοντες 3004 5723 V-PAP-NPM ανδρες 435 N-VPM αδελφοι 80 N-VPM ει 1487 COND εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S λογος 3056 N-NSM εν 1722 PREP υμιν 5213 P-2DP παρακλησεως 3874 N-GSF προς 4314 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM λαον 2992 N-ASM λεγετε 3004 5720 V-PAM-2P

    Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge

    VERSE (15) -
    :27; 15:21 Lu 4:16-18

    SEV Biblia, Chapter 13:15

    Y despus de la lectura de la ley y de los profetas, los príncipes de la sinagoga enviaron a ellos, diciendo: Varones hermanos, si hay en vosotros alguna palabra de exhortacin para el pueblo, hablad.

    Clarke's Bible Commentary - Acts 13:15

    Verse 15. After the
    reading of the law and the prophets] A certain portion of the law and another of the prophets, was read every Sabbath; and the law was so divided as to be read over once every year. In the notes at the conclusion of Deuteronomy, I have considered this subject at large, and given a complete table of the Parashoth, sections of the law, and Haphtaroth, sections of the prophets, which are read every Sabbath in the year in the Jewish synagogues. To have an exact view of every part of the Jewish ecclesiastical economy, the reader will do well to consult the above mentioned table, and those which follow it: they have been drawn up with great care, attention, and indescribable labour.

    It has been a question, in what language were the law and prophets read in a synagogue of Pisidia, for in that district Strabo informs us that four languages were spoken, viz. the Pisidian, the Solyman, the Greek, and the Lydian. Dr. Lightfoot conjectures, with great probability, that the Scriptures were read in the original Hebrew; and that an interpreter tendered the reading to the people in their mother tongue. There is no doubt that the Jews and proselytes understood the Greek tongue well; and they certainly had the Septuagint version among them.

    The rulers of the synagogue] These were the persons whose business it was to read the appointed sections, and to take care of the synagogue and its concerns; and to see that all was done decently and in order.

    Sent unto them] Seeing them to be Jews, they wished them to give some suitable address to the people, i.e. to the Jews who were then engaged in Divine worship; for the whole of the following discourse, which greatly resembles that of St. Stephen, chap. vii. 1-53, is directed to the Jews alone; and this was probably spoken either in Hebrew or Greek.

    Ye men and brethren] andrev adelfoi, Men brethren, a Hebraism for, "Ye men who are our brethren," i.e. Jews, as we ourselves are; but andrev is often an expletive, as we have already seen. See the note on chap. vii. 2.

    If ye have any word of exhortation] ei esti logov en umin paraklhsewv? If ye have any subject of consolation, any word of comfort to us, who are sojourners in this strange land, speak it. The Consolation of Israel was an epithet of the Messiah among the Jews; and it is probable that it was in reference to him that the rulers of the synagogue spoke. That paraklhsiv is to be understood here as meaning consolation, and this in reference to the Messiah, the whole of the following discourse will prove to the attentive reader; in which Paul shows the care and protection of God towards his people Israel, and the abundant provision he had made for their salvation by Jesus Christ. They wished for consolation, and he declared unto them glad tidings, and many felt the power and comfort of the doctrine of the cross.


    John Gill's Bible Commentary

    Ver. 15. And after the reading of the law and the prophets , etc.] Which was done every sabbath day, ( Acts 15:21) The five books of Moses, which are meant by the law, were divided into sections: Genesis was divided into twelve, Exodus into eleven, Leviticus into ten, Numbers into ten, and Deuteronomy into ten, which in all make fifty three sections: and so by reading one on each sabbath, and two on one day, they read through the whole law in the course of a year, and which they finished at the close of the feast of tabernacles; and that day was called hrwt tjm the rejoicing of the law; it was a day of rejoicing, that the law was read through. Some make fifty four sections, and then two of them must be read together, on two sabbath days, to finish the whole in the year. In some synagogues the section was divided into three parts, and so they finished the law in three years; but this custom was less common f663 . The custom of reading the law, the Jews say, was one hundred and seventy years before the time of Jesus Christ; though some say the division of the law, into sections, was made by Ezra; and others refer it to Moses himself: it is certain it obtained in the times of Christ and his apostles, as did also the reading of the prophets, and which was introduced in this way, and upon this account. When Antiochus Epiphanes burnt the book of the law, and forbad the reading of it, the Jews in the room of it selected some passages out of the prophets, which they thought came nearest in words and sense to the sections of the law, and read them in their stead; and when the law was restored again, they still continued the reading of the prophetic sections; and the section for the day was called hrjph , the dismission, because usually the people were dismissed upon it, unless anyone stood up, and preached or expounded the word of God unto the people: hence the following message and address to the apostles, the rulers of the synagogue sent unto them ; that is, those who were the principal men in the synagogue, the ruler of it, together with the elders; for there was but one ruler in a synagogue; (See Gill on Matthew 9:18) though there were more elders; and so the Syriac version here renders it, the elders of the synagogue; but it may be asked, why should they send to the apostles? how did they know that they were teachers, being strangers? this they might conclude from their outward appearance, their gravity and solidity; for as for habit or dress there was no distinction; or from their sitting down when they came into the synagogue, which was the custom of teachers; or they might have had some knowledge of them, and conversation with them, before they came into the synagogue; for it cannot be reasonably thought that they admitted anyone, whether they knew him or not, to teach in their synagogues: saying, ye men and brethren : which was the common style of the Jews, they used in addresses, and especially to their own countrymen, as they might perceive Paul and Barnabas were; (see Acts 2:29, 7:2). if ye have any word of exhortation for the people, say on ; the sense is, if they were prepared to preach, or had anything upon their minds to say to the people; or if they had, as it is in the original text, any word of exhortation or comfort in them, as they had indeed a rich treasure in their earthen vessels, they had leave and liberty to speak it to the people. A word of exhortation designs any doctrine that might be for instruction and comfort, and this was agreeably to the practice of the Jews. For it is said f664 on the sabbath day, hrd yrwd , they preach a sermon, or expound to housekeepers (or masters of families), who are employed in business all the days of the week; and in the midst of the sermon they teach them the traditions, concerning what is forbidden, and what is lawful; and it is better for them to hear than to read in the Hagiographa; which books they did not read publicly, as is said in the same place, only the law and the prophets; with the latter of which they dismissed the people, unless a sermon was preached; and which, when done, was chiefly for the sake of the common people, men and women: and it is said f665 , that the women, and the people of the earth (or the common people), come to hear the sermon, and the preachers ought to draw out their hearts; speak out their whole mind, and deliver all they know that may be instructive and profitable.

    Matthew Henry Commentary

    Verses 14-31 - When we come together to
    worship God, we must do it, not only by praye and praise, but by the reading and hearing of the word of God. The bar reading of the Scriptures in public assemblies is not enough; the should be expounded, and the people exhorted out of them. This i helping people in doing that which is necessary to make the wor profitable, to apply it to themselves. Every thing is touched upon in this sermon, which might best prevail with Jews to receive and embrac Christ as the promised Messiah. And every view, however short or faint of the Lord's dealings with his church, reminds us of his mercy an long-suffering, and of man's ingratitude and perverseness. Paul passe from David to the Son of David, and shows that this Jesus is his promised Seed; a Saviour to do that for them, which the judges of ol could not do, to save them from their sins, their worst enemies. When the apostles preached Christ as the Saviour, they were so far from concealing his death, that they always preached Christ crucified. Ou complete separation from sin, is represented by our being buried with Christ. But he rose again from the dead, and saw no corruption: thi was the great truth to be preached.


    Greek Textus Receptus


    μετα
    3326 PREP δε 1161 CONJ την 3588 T-ASF αναγνωσιν 320 N-ASF του 3588 T-GSM νομου 3551 N-GSM και 2532 CONJ των 3588 T-GPM προφητων 4396 N-GPM απεστειλαν 649 5656 V-AAI-3P οι 3588 T-NPM αρχισυναγωγοι 752 N-NPM προς 4314 PREP αυτους 846 P-APM λεγοντες 3004 5723 V-PAP-NPM ανδρες 435 N-VPM αδελφοι 80 N-VPM ει 1487 COND εστιν 2076 5748 V-PXI-3S λογος 3056 N-NSM εν 1722 PREP υμιν 5213 P-2DP παρακλησεως 3874 N-GSF προς 4314 PREP τον 3588 T-ASM λαον 2992 N-ASM λεγετε 3004 5720 V-PAM-2P

    Vincent's NT Word Studies

    15. Exhortation. See on ch. ix. 31.

    Robertson's NT Word Studies

    13:15 {After the
    reading of the law and the prophets} (meta ten anagnwsin tou nomou kai twn profetwn). The law was first read in the synagogues till B.C. 163 when Antiochus Epiphones prohibited it. qen the reading of the prophets was substituted for it. The Maccabees restored both. There was a reading from the law and one from the prophets in Hebrew which was interpreted into the Aramaic or the Greek _Koin_ for the people. The reading was followed by the sermon as when Jesus was invited to read and to preach in Nazareth (#Lu 4:16f.). For the service in the synagogue see Schuerer, _History of the Jewish People_, Div. II, Vol. II, pp. 79ff. It was the duty of the rulers of the synagogue (arcisunagwgoi) to select the readers and the speakers for the service (#Mr 5:22,35-38; Lu 8:49; 13:14; Ac 13:15; 18:8,17). Any rabbi or distinguished stranger could be called on to speak. {If ye have any word of exhortation for the people} (ei tis estin en humin logos paraklesews pros ton laon). Literally, if there is among you any word of exhortation for the people. It is a condition of the first class and assumed to be true, a polite invitation. On "exhortation" (paraklesis) see #9:31. It may be a technical phrase used in the synagogue (#Heb 13:22; 1Ti 4:13).


    CHAPTERS: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
    VERSES: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52

    PARALLEL VERSE BIBLE

    God Rules.NET